Astronomy and Space

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Estiveo
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#101

Post by Estiveo » Tue Oct 09, 2018 2:26 pm

A time lapse of the SpaceX launch above the L.A. skyline.

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#102

Post by TollandRCR » Tue Oct 09, 2018 8:23 pm

Are the little lights reusable modules? Fighter planes?
“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#103

Post by Estiveo » Tue Oct 09, 2018 8:41 pm

TollandRCR wrote:
Tue Oct 09, 2018 8:23 pm
Are the little lights reusable modules? Fighter planes?
The lights going up on the left are commercial air traffic. The one going down on the right, that fades out and comes back as it descends, is the first stage booster coming back to land. That booster is what we up north in Morgan Hill saw in the photo I posted above the video.
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#104

Post by TollandRCR » Tue Oct 09, 2018 8:44 pm

I think I would love to be on the right side of a commercial airliner when SpaceX launches.
“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#105

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Oct 11, 2018 1:41 pm

Soyuz Rocket Launch Failure Forces Emergency Landing for US-Russian Space Station Crew
By Meghan Bartels, Space.com Senior Writer | October 11, 2018 05:11am ET

A Russian Soyuz rocket carrying a new U.S.-Russian crew to the International Space Station failed during its ascent Thursday (Oct. 11), sending its crew capsule falling back toward Earth in a ballistic re-entry, NASA officials said.

A search-and-rescue team has reached the landing site, both crewmembers are in good condition and have left the Soyuz capsule as of 6:10 a.m. EDT, NASA spokesperson Brandi Dean said during live television commentary. Russian space agency Roscosmos has released photographs of both astronauts being checked over after their abrupt landing.

The Soyuz rocket and its Soyuz MS-10 space capsule lifted off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at about 4:47 a.m. EDT (0847 GMT) with NASA astronaut Nick Hague and cosmonaut Aleksey Ovchinin aboard. The pair were due to join the three-person Expedition 57 crew already aboard the International Space Station. But something went wrong minutes after liftoff, sending the Soyuz capsule into a ballistic re-entry, NASA officials said.

"Confirming again that the today's Soyuz MS10 launch did go into a ballistic re-entry mode a little bit after its launch," Dean said during live television commentary. "That means the crew will not be going to the International Space Station today. Instead they'll be taking a sharp landing, coming back to Earth."


https://www.space.com/42097-soyuz-rocke ... -crew.html

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#106

Post by AndyinPA » Tue Oct 30, 2018 7:25 pm

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/nasas-kepl ... 018-10-30/

NASA's Kepler spacecraft, which discovered more than 2,680 exoplanets orbiting distant stars and allowed scientists to statistically show billions more must exist across the Milky Way, has finally run out of fuel, bringing one of NASA's most scientifically productive projects to an end after an extended nine-and-a-half year mission, mission managers said Tuesday.

"The Kepler mission has been an enormous success," said Bill Borucki, the original Kepler principal investigator and leader of the team that convinced NASA to build and launch the $692 million mission in 2009.

"We have shown there are more planets than stars in our galaxy, that many of these planets are roughly the size of the Earth and some, like the Earth, are at the right distance from their star that there could be liquid water on the surface, a situation conducive to the existence of life," Borucki said.

Kepler also found planets "completely unlike those in our solar system," he told reporters. "Some of those, in fact, might be actual water worlds. We've also found planets that were formed at the beginning of the formation of our galaxy six-and-a-half billion years before the formation of our own star and before the formation of the Earth. Imagine what life might be like on such planets."

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#107

Post by RTH10260 » Sat Nov 03, 2018 6:42 pm

just a snippet, remainder behind paywall
Galactic crash gave Milky Way its cream
Rhys Blakely, Science Correspondent
November 1 2018, 12:01am, The Times

Scientists have shed light on how the Milky Way came to be so milky: it crashed into another galaxy ten billion years ago and stole its stars.

The collision reordered the heavens more than five billion years before the Earth was formed. The dwarf galaxy that careered into ours, which has been named Gaia-Enceladus, is believed to have been about a fifth of the mass of the Milky Way and carried with it an estimated 600 million stars.

The impact is thought to have “puffed up” the so-called thick-disk portion of our galaxy, which is part of the milky band of light visible in the night sky.

The thickness of the thick disk increased by as much as a factor of ten after the collision,…


https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/news ... -jhdzhgbsj

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#108

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Tue Nov 13, 2018 9:29 am

https://www.cnet.com/news/scientists-pr ... the-earth/
Scientists predict a 'dark matter hurricane' will collide with the Earth

Throughout the Milky Way there are a number of stellar streams, gatherings of stars that were once dwarf galaxies or clusters. In ancient history they collided with the Milky Way and were torn apart -- leaving a stream of orbiting stars that circle the galactic centre. One such stellar stream, dubbed S1 and discovered last year by scientists examining data from the European Space Agency's Gaia satellite, passes directly through the path of our sun.

As our solar system speeds through the outer reaches of the Milky Way, it flies through dark matter at around 230 kilometres per second ( around 143 miles per second). A study, published Nov. 7 and led by researchers at the University of Zaragoza, suggests that the dark matter present in the stream may be travelling at double that speed -- roughly 500km/s (around 310 miles per second) -- giving us a much better chance at detecting dark matter.

Of course, we're not quite sure what makes up dark matter, but there are a number of candidates including weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs), gravitationally-interacting massive particles (GIMPs) and axions -- hypothetical elementary particles posited by physicists.

Because the S1 steller stream travels directly through the solar system, the dark matter hurricane is likely to cross the path of various detectors spread across the globe set up to detect these hypothetical particles. The study concedes that current iterations of WIMP detectors will likely not see dark matter from the S1 stream. However, those are geared to detect "axionic dark matter", based on a hypothetical particle known as an axion.
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#109

Post by Sluffy1 » Tue Nov 13, 2018 4:30 pm

Speaking of our Milky Way..
I recently learned it is one the oldest galaxies at 13.5 billion years (Andromeda is only 10 billion)
Big Bang happened at 13.8 billion (a mere 300 million before our Milky Ways oldest star.)
Our Sun is 4.6 billion, Earth is 4.5 billion.
I think it takes that long for a word like Earth to develop, perfect for life like us to have a chance to evolve.
Earths are rare, it takes an entire universe to produce a few over all of time.
I believe at this point in time... we are alone.

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#110

Post by RoadScholar » Tue Nov 13, 2018 9:22 pm

Very, very unlikely. There are probably millions of planets or moons with life in our galaxy alone. Intelligent, technological beings? Probably some, but apparently none that have mastered faster than light travel. So there is an excellent chance we will encounter life soon, but in terms of meaningful contact... yeah, we’ll probably be alone for quite some time.
The bitterest truth is healthier than the sweetest lie.
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#111

Post by tencats » Mon Nov 26, 2018 2:29 pm

Monday, Nov. 26: InSight Mars Landing Coverage Begins 2 p.m. ET (11 a.m. PT)

https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html#

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#112

Post by neeneko » Mon Nov 26, 2018 2:46 pm

Sluffy1 wrote:
Tue Nov 13, 2018 4:30 pm
Speaking of our Milky Way..
I recently learned it is one the oldest galaxies at 13.5 billion years (Andromeda is only 10 billion)
Big Bang happened at 13.8 billion (a mere 300 million before our Milky Ways oldest star.)
Our Sun is 4.6 billion, Earth is 4.5 billion.
I think it takes that long for a word like Earth to develop, perfect for life like us to have a chance to evolve.
Earths are rare, it takes an entire universe to produce a few over all of time.
I believe at this point in time... we are alone.
Well, 'rare earth' is one of the commonly proposed solutions to the fermi paradox, and has some merit, but at the end of the day we just don't know enough about what is common and what is not. Earth alone has gone through numerous mass extinctions, any number of which ended an era that seemingly could have produced life like us but did not.

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#113

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Nov 26, 2018 2:55 pm

Congrats to NASA for the touchdown on Mars!!!

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#114

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Nov 26, 2018 3:00 pm

Just received first image of the green man on Mars ;)

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#115

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Nov 27, 2018 12:17 pm

InSight Is Catching Rays on Mars

NASA's InSight has sent signals to Earth indicating that its solar panels are open and collecting sunlight on the Martian surface. NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter relayed the signals, which were received on Earth at about 5:30 p.m. PST (8:30 p.m. EST). Solar array deployment ensures the spacecraft can recharge its batteries each day. Odyssey also relayed a pair of images showing InSight's landing site.

"The InSight team can rest a little easier tonight now that we know the spacecraft solar arrays are deployed and recharging the batteries," said Tom Hoffman, InSight's project manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, which leads the mission. "It's been a long day for the team. But tomorrow begins an exciting new chapter for InSight: surface operations and the beginning of the instrument deployment phase."


https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/insigh ... ys-on-mars

The Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC), located on the robotic arm of NASA's InSight lander, took this picture off the Martian surface on Nov. 26, 2018, the same day the spacecraft touched down on the Red Planet. The camera's transparent dust cover is still on in this image, to prevent particulates kicked up during landing from settling on the camera's lens. This image was relayed from InSight to Earth via NASA's Odyssey spacecraft, currently orbiting Mars.

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#116

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Nov 27, 2018 12:19 pm

NASA page for this project

InSight Mars Lander

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#117

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Nov 27, 2018 12:24 pm

InSIghts small companions for the duration of the landing on Mars
Mars Cube One (MarCO)
Mission Overview

On May 5, 2018, NASA launched a stationary lander called InSight to Mars. Riding along with InSight were two CubeSats -- the first of this kind of spacecraft to fly to deep space. If this flyby demonstration is successful, the technology onboard each CubeSat will provide NASA the ability to quickly transmit status information about InSight as it lands on Mars.

The twin communications-relay CubeSats, built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, constitute a technology demonstration called Mars Cube One (MarCO). CubeSats are a class of spacecraft based on a standardized small size and modular use of off-the-shelf technologies. Many have been made by university students, and dozens have been launched into Earth orbit using extra payload mass available on launches of larger spacecraft.

The basic CubeSat unit is a box roughly 4 inches (10 centimeters) square. Larger CubeSats are multiples of that unit. MarCO's design is a six-unit CubeSat - about the size of a briefcase -- with a stowed size of about 14.4 inches (36.6 centimeters) by 9.5 inches (24.3 centimeters) by 4.6 inches (11.8 centimeters).

"MarCO-A and B are our first and second interplanetary CubeSats designed to monitor InSight for a short period around landing, if the MarCO pair makes it to Mars,” said Jim Green, director of NASA's planetary science division at the agency's headquarters in Washington. “However, these CubeSat missions are not needed for InSight’s mission success. They are a demonstration of potential future capability. The MarCO pair will carry their own communications and navigation experiments as they fly independently to the Red Planet."



https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/cubesat/missions/marco.php

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#118

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Dec 03, 2018 11:33 pm

SpaceX launches biggest U.S. 'rideshare' mission with 64 satellites
Joey Roulette

(Reuters) - Elon Musk’s SpaceX launched a Falcon 9 rocket from California on Monday carrying 64 small satellites into low orbit around the Earth, which the company called the largest-ever “rideshare” mission by a U.S.-based rocket.

The mission, dubbed SSO-A, also marked the third voyage to space for the same Falcon 9 rocket - another milestone for SpaceX’s cost-cutting reusable rocket technology.

The Falcon 9 blasted off from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California at 10:34 a.m. local time (18:34 GMT) carrying satellites from 34 different companies, government agencies, and universities, including the University of Illinois.

SpaceX said the mission was “one of the most complex and intricate endeavors” for Seattle-based startup Spaceflight, the ride-share company that arranged passage for each satellite maker.

The mission comes days after India fired a rocket carrying 31 satellites into space.



https://www.reuters.com/article/us-spac ... SKBN1O22JQ

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#119

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Fri Dec 07, 2018 9:00 am

https://www.express.co.uk/news/science/ ... -discovery
Dark matter mystery SOLVED: Dark fluid could permeate the universe and keep it together
“A black woman can invent something for the benefit of humankind.” -Bessie Blount-Griffin, physical therapist, inventor of devices for disabled WWII veterans, and forensic scientist.

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#120

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Dec 07, 2018 7:07 pm

Chang’e 4 launches China’s bid to be first on dark side of the moon
Lunar lander and rover spacecraft blasts off on Saturday in challenging mission to explore moon’s lesser-known far side
Success would significantly boost the standing of the Chinese space programme


PUBLISHED : Friday, 07 December, 2018, 5:31pm
UPDATED : Saturday, 08 December, 2018, 5:07am
Zhenhua Lu, US correspondent
Alice Shen

A rocket carrying China’s latest lunar lander and rover spacecraft, Chang’e 4, blasted off at about 2.23am local time on Saturday from Xichang Satellite Launch Centre in southern China, in humankind’s first attempt to land on the far side of the moon.

An unofficial live stream recording the launch and viewable on Chinese social media, showed the Long March 3B rocket lifting off from the launch pad with a stunning trail of flame lighting up the early morning sky. Chinese state television did not broadcast the launch.

The craft is expected to land sometime between January 1 and 3 after a five-day cruise to the Moon and insertion into lunar orbit, the US’ Smithsonian Institution, a group of museums and research centres, reported on its websites. The spacecraft would make a few course corrections in preparation for landing at Von Kármán crater, the Smithsonian said.


https://www.scmp.com/news/china/science ... -side-moon

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#121

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Dec 12, 2018 5:34 pm

somewhat technical but interesting reading
Galileo 5 and 6 Eccentric Satellites: Mission Recovery and Exploitation Part I
August 15, 2018 By Inside GNSS

With plenty of promise, the third launch of Europe’s Galileo constellation took place four years ago. What followed was not at all what was expected, as problems turned much of the promise into gloom.

Unusually low power and instability in the radio signals received from the two satellites at the telemetry stations operated by the European Space Agency (ESA), the French National Space Agency (CNES) and the Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) showed that the satellites were not in their expected orbit. What followed, however, was a variety of procedures that led to the mission recovery and returned promise to the program.

Here, the authors explain how Galileo satellites 5 and 6, which were almost considered lost, put under test the ingenuity of the many engineers involved in the recovery of this mission demonstrating the technical excellence and collaborations with experts from various institutions, space agencies and industrial partners.

:snippity:

Everything is Relative

Iterating with several European scientific institutions, it became apparent from the very beginning that the recovery orbits of Galileo satellites 5 and 6, still eccentric, were, in turn, offering a unique opportunity to conduct a test of Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity by measuring more accurately than ever before the way that gravity affects the passing of time. Indeed, Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity (GR) predicts that time flows differently for two clocks that have a relative speed and are placed in different gravitational potentials. It should therefore be possible to test General Relativity by comparing the frequencies of two atomic clocks, in a so-called gravitational redshift test. A gravitational redshift experiment tests the Local Position Invariance (LPI), which is one of the aspects of the Einstein Equivalence Principle which may be tested. As several alternative theories of gravitation predict violations of this effect – e.g. in attempts to unify GR and quantum theory – experimental constraints are of paramount importance. The recovery orbits of Galileo 5 and 6 and the specificities of the Galileo satellites made these especially suitable for a Gravitational redshift tests



http://insidegnss.com/galileo-5-and-6-e ... on-part-i/

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#122

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Dec 12, 2018 5:43 pm

How the Green Men arrived on earth ;)
Two Scottish islands have soil similar to Mars: geologists
NASA's Curiosity Mars rover

Ben Cousins, CTVNews.ca Staff
Published Wednesday, December 12, 2018 12:19PM EST

Geologists in Scotland say two rural, mountainous islands have soil matching that of Mars.

Using open-source data from NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity, the geologists were able to compare soil samples from the red planet to a database of more than 1,500 Scottish soil samples. They found the Martian soil matches closely to two Scottish islands: Skye and Mull.

Skye and Mull are fairly mountainous islands on the west coast of Scotland. Skye is a popular tourist destination and has been featured in several films, including "Prometheus," "The BFG" and "Transformers: The Last Knight."

Benjamin Butler, a digital mineralogist with the James Hutton Institute in Aberdeen, Scotland, said the results make sense due to the similarities between the islands and Mars.



https://www.ctvnews.ca/sci-tech/two-sco ... -1.4214918

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#123

Post by Sam the Centipede » Wed Dec 12, 2018 7:54 pm

:think: So that explains the Scots' love of Mars bars, especially battered and deep-fried?


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Re: Astronomy and Space

#124

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Fri Dec 14, 2018 2:43 pm

https://www.forbes.com/sites/startswith ... r-you/amp/
Love Science, Space and Physics? This Holiday Gift Guide Is For You

Best murder-science story: Anxiety And The Equation by Eric Johnson. You can’t really call it a murder-mystery when the first chapter is entitled “Boltzmann kills himself,” but the story really gets interesting in its exploration of why. Boltzmann’s ideas about the macroscopic Universe and how it worked at a microscopic level were simultaneously brilliant, correct, and so counterintuitive that he was ridiculed constantly both publicly and privately.

Many of you reading this will immediately feel empathy for someone you know who took their own lives due to internal and external pressures like this, and some of you (like me) know people who did this within the field of physics, where this aspect of the culture remains problematic today. Nevertheless, the physics is brilliant and clearly explained, and the story is well-told with a lot of sympathy for its protagonist. If you like science biographies and ever had an interest in thermodynamics, entropy, or the connection between the world we see and the particle-based world beneath it, you might truly enjoy this book.
“A black woman can invent something for the benefit of humankind.” -Bessie Blount-Griffin, physical therapist, inventor of devices for disabled WWII veterans, and forensic scientist.

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#125

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Dec 19, 2018 6:32 pm

Virgin Galactic hero VIRGIN GALACTIC MAKES IT TO SPACE! DEPENDING ON WHAT YOU MEAN BY 'SPACE'!

Phil Plait Dec 19, 2018

On December 13, 2018, the Virgin Galactic rocketplane VSS Unity was carried into the sky literally under the wing of its mothership VMS Eve. When they reached a height of over 13 kilometers, Unity was dropped. After a few seconds its rocket motors kicked in, accelerating the spaceplane to nearly three times the speed of sound, putting it on a parabolic path that took it soaring to a height above Earth of over 82 kilometers. As it fell back to Earth and the air got thick enough, Unity lived up to its adjectival suffix, becoming an airplane that glided safely back to the ground.

This is a pretty big deal. It was the fourth powered test flight of Unity and, depending on how you look at it, the first time it reached space. I'll get back to that particular issue in a sec, but I want to make some things clear first.

This is the highest flight of a SpaceShipTwo type spaceplane so far. The first model, VSS Enterprise, flew several test flights but in 2014 suffered a catastrophic failure, killing the co-pilot and injuring the pilot. Unity is the second SS2 spaceplane built, and has modifications to prevent the same sort of issue that Enterprise suffered.

This flight was suborbital, meaning that it essentially went up and back down again. This is very different than orbital flight, which takes a lot more energy to achieve. Still, a lot can be done on a short flight like this. The vehicle, payloads, and passengers all experience several minutes of microgravity (also called freefall, though weightlessness is a common if misleading term) once the rockets turn off and the vehicle undergoes ballistic flight up, over, and down its parabolic path. It's enough time to do all sorts of interesting experiments, and in fact four experiments flew on this flight; Virgin Galactic notes it's their first revenue-generating flight. That's a great milestone.



https://www.syfy.com/syfywire/virgin-ga ... n-by-space

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