Science, General Stuff

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tencats
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1151

Post by tencats » Wed Jan 10, 2018 1:33 pm

What Went Wrong With the Launch of the Secretive Zuma Satellite?
Not all is well for the classified Zuma satellite launched from Florida on Sunday
A secretive Zuma satellite launch on behalf of an unknown U.S. government agency recently went awry. Amidst speculation, one thing is certain: the satellite isn’t fully functional in its intended orbit.

Late on Sunday night, SpaceX launched a satellite manufactured by Northrop Grumman out of Florida. Few details about the satellite are officially known besides its codename “Zuma,” not even which government agency intended to use the satellite nor for what purpose. The satellite was destined for low-Earth orbit, Robin Seemangal wrote for Wired late last year, and unlike most launches, the satellite manufacturer Northrop Grumman, not SpaceX, supplied the payload adapter used to secure the satellite during launch and release it into orbit.

As it usually does for classified launches, Loren Grush reports for The Verge, SpaceX censored coverage of the launch, cutting its livestream prior to nose cone separation that would reveal the payload. It did stream the successful landing of the Falcon 9 first stage rocket booster after it completed its primary mission.

Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-ne ... e31Z80B.99
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For more detailed report on this, read more about here.
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2018/01 ... satellite/



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1152

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Jan 11, 2018 4:38 pm

A gravitational wave passed thru Colberts Late Night Show a year ago
Gravitational Waves Hit The Late Show

The Late Show with Stephen Colbert
Published on 25 Feb 2016

Brian Greene stops by to demonstrate an exciting new scientific discovery



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1153

Post by AndyinPA » Mon Jan 22, 2018 9:08 pm

http://www.newsweek.com/end-men-y-chrom ... ing-785043
The Y chromosome may be a symbol of masculinity, but it is becoming increasingly clear that it is anything but strong and enduring. Although it carries the “master switch” gene, SRY, that determines whether an embryo will develop as male (XY) or female (XX), it contains very few other genes and is the only chromosome not necessary for life. Women, after all, manage just fine without one.

What’s more, the Y chromosome has degenerated rapidly, leaving females with two perfectly normal X chromosomes, but males with an X and a shriveled Y. If the same rate of degeneration continues, the Y chromosome has just 4.6 million years left before it disappears completely. This may sound like a long time, but it isn’t when you consider that life has existed on Earth for 3.5 billion years.



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1154

Post by WriteItDown » Mon Jan 22, 2018 10:18 pm

UFOs exist, by definition
Aliens also exist but do not come from UFOs


Bloom where you're planted 🌷

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1155

Post by WriteItDown » Mon Jan 22, 2018 10:23 pm

UFOs exist, by definition
Aliens also exist but do not come from UFOs
Edit:
8-) :shock:


Changing the subject, has anyone had CAR-T therapy? It is an amazing new approach to cancer therapy. I will be in a clinical trial for it very soon.


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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1156

Post by Patagoniagirl » Mon Jan 22, 2018 10:41 pm

I love this thread! I don't know what CAR-T therapy is, but will look it up and hope it is a wonderful breakthrough for you. I recently listened to a couple of podcasts about CRISPR. similar?



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1157

Post by Slartibartfast » Tue Jan 23, 2018 1:59 am

Patagoniagirl wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 10:41 pm
I love this thread! I don't know what CAR-T therapy is, but will look it up and hope it is a wonderful breakthrough for you. I recently listened to a couple of podcasts about CRISPR. similar?
I didn't know anything about CAR-T cell therapy, but I looked it up and it's a different take on the same theory I'm using to fight cancer -- empowering your body's natural defenses to help. Basically it sounds like they remove a bunch of your T Cells (part of your immune system) and give them upgraded cancer detectors and then put them back in your body to wreak havoc on the cancer.

The website I looked at (link for rikker: https://www.explorecarttherapy.com/about-CAR-T-therapy ) says that they add a receptor to your T cells after they remove them from your body, so they tinker with them somehow in vitro to do this. The cool thing about CRISPR is that it allows you to do essentially any genetic engineering you want (and can design) in vivo. Now, CRISPR could have been used outside of the body to avoid all of your cells growing these new receptors (CRISPR just makes the desired changes in your DNA, it doesn't choose what kind of cells it effects, so it couldn't be targeted at T cells), but it seems more likely that they are just upgrading the existing cell structure rather than rewriting its DNA.

WriteItDown,

Like I said, I didn't know anything about this before doing a little Googling, but I've been doing cancer research for over a decade and trying commercialize that research to help pharmaceutical companies develop drugs to make chemotherapy and radiation more effective for most of that time. When I look at this, it seems legit. I don't know the specifics of what type of cancer you have and what stage it's in, but I'm guessing that if you got into the trial then it is probably a good bet for you. Please let us know more about it as you undergo the therapy. And let me know if there are any technical questions I might be able to help you with. Translating cancer research so laymen can understand is my job. One of them, anyway.


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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1158

Post by Foggy » Tue Jan 23, 2018 5:56 am

AndyinPA wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 9:08 pm
http://www.newsweek.com/end-men-y-chrom ... ing-785043
The Y chromosome may be a symbol of masculinity, but it is becoming increasingly clear that it is anything but strong and enduring. Although it carries the “master switch” gene, SRY, that determines whether an embryo will develop as male (XY) or female (XX), it contains very few other genes and is the only chromosome not necessary for life. Women, after all, manage just fine without one.

What’s more, the Y chromosome has degenerated rapidly, leaving females with two perfectly normal X chromosomes, but males with an X and a shriveled Y. If the same rate of degeneration continues, the Y chromosome has just 4.6 million years left before it disappears completely. This may sound like a long time, but it isn’t when you consider that life has existed on Earth for 3.5 billion years.
OMG that is so sexist. I'm being objectified! Besides, my Y chromosome isn't shriveled all the time, you can ask ol' Wifehorn! That mostly happens when I been swimming in chilly water. :blink:


Hopefully, this will blossom into a snowball.
WWG1WGA

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1159

Post by AndyinPA » Tue Jan 23, 2018 9:28 am

Foggy wrote:
Tue Jan 23, 2018 5:56 am
AndyinPA wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 9:08 pm
http://www.newsweek.com/end-men-y-chrom ... ing-785043
The Y chromosome may be a symbol of masculinity, but it is becoming increasingly clear that it is anything but strong and enduring. Although it carries the “master switch” gene, SRY, that determines whether an embryo will develop as male (XY) or female (XX), it contains very few other genes and is the only chromosome not necessary for life. Women, after all, manage just fine without one.

What’s more, the Y chromosome has degenerated rapidly, leaving females with two perfectly normal X chromosomes, but males with an X and a shriveled Y. If the same rate of degeneration continues, the Y chromosome has just 4.6 million years left before it disappears completely. This may sound like a long time, but it isn’t when you consider that life has existed on Earth for 3.5 billion years.
OMG that is so sexist. I'm being objectified! Besides, my Y chromosome isn't shriveled all the time, you can ask ol' Wifehorn! That mostly happens when I been swimming in chilly water. :blink:
:rotflmao:



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1160

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Tue Jan 23, 2018 9:45 am

Uhm, Foggy, this is a delicate topic, but that is not your Y chromosome shriveling when you swim in chilly water. Chilidog can explain it.


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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1161

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Jan 24, 2018 11:17 pm

The US may want to reconsider their education system and challenge the inherent anti-illectualism and anti-science trends in society (even when taking into account the difference in population sizes)
China declared world’s largest producer of scientific articles
Report shows increasing international competition, but suggests that United States remains a scientific powerhouse.
Jeff Tollefson

For the first time, China has overtaken the United States in terms of the total number of science publications, according to statistics compiled by the US National Science Foundation (NSF).

The agency’s report, released on 18 January, documents the United States’ increasing competition from China and other developing countries that are stepping up their investments in science and technology. Nonetheless, the report suggests that the United States remains a scientific powerhouse, pumping out high-profile research, attracting international students and translating science into valuable intellectual property.

“The US continues to be the global leader in science and technology, but the world is changing,” says Maria Zuber, a geophysicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. As other nations increase their output, the United States’ relative share of global science activity is declining, says Zuber, who chairs the National Science Board, which oversees the NSF and produced the report. “We can’t be asleep at the wheel.”

The shifting landscape is already evident in terms of the sheer volume of publications: China published more than 426,000 studies in 2016, or 18.6% of the total documented in Elsevier’s Scopus database. That compares with nearly 409,000 by the United States. India surpassed Japan, and the rest of the developing world continued its upward trend.


https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-00927-4
Also table from report at https://www.nsf.gov/statistics/2018/nsb ... barCtr1037 (scroll down)



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1162

Post by tencats » Thu Jan 25, 2018 3:51 am

China surges with 52 Gigs of new Solar as Trump kneecaps US sector with 30% Tariffs

Clean Technica reports that China blew the top off expectations for its solar installations in 2017, It put in 52.83 gigawatts.
https://cleantechnica.com/2018/01/22/ch ... -2017-nea/
The US is a midget in the solar generation game, in contrast.

The incredible 2017 solar surge in China brought its total solar installed capacity up to 130 gigawatts. As a cursory look at these statistics makes obvious, in one year China increased its solar by nearly 70 percent. In short, it wasn’t so far from doubling its ability to generate electricity from solar sources.

In the US, there has been a relatively successful corporate resistance to renewables, which is reinforced by measures such as Trump’s support for coal and his recent slapping of a 30% tariff on inexpensive Chinese solar panels, as well as by state legislatures’ obstructionism, paid for by ALEC and the Koch brothers. Renewables only account for 15% of US electricity generation, with a lot of that being hydro, despite a massive and expensive crisis of extreme weather and sea level rise. Trump’s tariffs on inexpensive Chinese-made panels will especially hurt people in the Deep South, who have a great deal of sunshine but whose GOP state legislatures have put in punitive measures to keep them from saving money with rooftop solar installations. The tariffs, however, will only slow adoption of solar. I put American-made panels on my home because they are more reliable, and last summer my average electricity bill was $14 a month. Even the more expensive American ones pay for themselves in 7 years, less if you use them to power an electric car like a Bolt, Leaf or Tesla 3. The main problem isn’t the cost of the panels, which will fall rapidly anyway, but the lack of financing and of a favorable policy environment (Snyder in Michigan, a corrupt Koch puppet, slapped property taxes on solar panels).

https://www.juancole.com/2018/01/surges ... riffs.html



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1163

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Thu Jan 25, 2018 6:20 am

Today in history: Patent filed for first video game.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathode ... ent_device
Cathode-ray tube amusement device

The cathode-ray tube amusement device is the earliest known interactive electronic game. The device simulates an artillery shell arcing towards targets on a cathode ray tube (CRT) screen, which is controlled by the player by adjusting knobs to change the trajectory of a CRT beam spot on the display in order to reach plastic targets overlaid on the screen. Thomas T. Goldsmith, Jr. and Estle Ray Mann constructed the game from analog electronics and filed for a patent in 1947, which was issued the following year. The gaming device was never manufactured or marketed to the public, so it had no effect on the future video game industry. Under most definitions, the device is not considered a video game, as while it had an electronic display it did not run on a computing device. Therefore, despite its relevance to the early history of video games, it is not generally considered a candidate for the title of the first video game.


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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1164

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Sat Jan 27, 2018 9:24 am



"The people must know before they can act, and there is no educator to compare with the press." - Ida B. Wells-Barnett, journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist, feminist and founder with others of NAACP.

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1165

Post by RTH10260 » Sat Jan 27, 2018 9:50 am

Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Sat Jan 27, 2018 9:24 am
https:// youtube.com/watch?v=r6MEM3b7Uqc
After it evolved and came to terra firma:
EvolvedFishHorse.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1166

Post by RVInit » Sat Jan 27, 2018 9:52 am

RTH10260 wrote:
Sat Jan 27, 2018 9:50 am
Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Sat Jan 27, 2018 9:24 am
After it evolved and came to terra firma:
EvolvedFishHorse.jpg
:lol:


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ImageImage

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1167

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Sat Jan 27, 2018 9:54 am

:rockon:


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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1168

Post by Volkonski » Mon Jan 29, 2018 10:18 am


Bill Gates‏
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I can’t wait for readers to get their hands on my new favorite book. You can download a free chapter of “Enlightenment Now” here: http://b-gat.es/2GsBQIQ
I’m all for more reason, science, and humanism, but what I found most interesting were the 15 chapters exploring each measure of progress. Pinker is at his best when he analyzes historic trends and uses data to put the past into context. I was already familiar with a lot of the information he shares—especially about health and energy—but he understands each subject so deeply that he’s able to articulate his case in a way that feels fresh and new.

:snippity:

1- You’re 37 times less likely to be killed by a bolt of lightning than you were at the turn of the century—and that’s not because there are fewer thunderstorms today. It’s because we have better weather prediction capabilities, improved safety education, and more people living in cities.
2-Time spent doing laundry fell from 11.5 hours a week in 1920 to an hour and a half in 2014. This might sound trivial in the grand scheme of progress. But the rise of the washing machine has improved quality of life by freeing up time for people—mostly women—to enjoy other pursuits. That time represents nearly half a day every week that could be used for everything from binge-watching Ozark or reading a book to starting a new business.
3- You’re way less likely to die on the job. Every year, 5,000 people die from occupational accidents in the U.S. But in 1929—when our population was less than two-fifths the size it is today—20,000 people died on the job. People back then viewed deadly workplace accidents as part of the cost of doing business. Today, we know better, and we’ve engineered ways to build things without putting nearly as many lives at risk.
4- The global average IQ score is rising by about 3 IQ points every decade. Kids’ brains are developing more fully thanks to improved nutrition and a cleaner environment. Pinker also credits more analytical thinking in and out of the classroom. Think about how many symbols you interpret every time you check your phone’s home screen or look at a subway map. Our world today encourages abstract thought from a young age, and it’s making us smarter.
5= War is illegal. This idea seems obvious. But before the creation of the United Nations in 1945, no institution had the power to stop countries from going to war with each other. Although there have been some exceptions, the threat of international sanctions and intervention has proven to be an effective deterrent to wars between nations.


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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1169

Post by RoadScholar » Mon Jan 29, 2018 10:38 am

Parents make autistic kids drink bleach to ‘cure’ them

https://www.rawstory.com/2018/01/parent ... each-cure/

Parents are making their children drink industrial bleach to cure them of autism—with the potentially deadly practice linked back to a U.S. cult.
:snippity:
The treatment being administered is CD (Chloride Dioxide) or MMS (Miracle Mineral Solution)—with a secret Facebook group touting its use to desperate parents in the U.K. The solution includes two chemicals – sodium chlorite and hydrochloric acid – that combine to make bleach. It is sold to be used orally or as an enema.

They believe that autism is caused by pathogens and parasites, which Chloride Dioxide kills. Doctors say that the claims of adherents are groundless, the solution is untested and can cause serious harm.

The method has been promoted by a controversial U.S. church with a branch in Los Angeles - the secretive Genesis II Church, founded by Jim Humble, a former scientologist. A 2016 investigation by Eyewitness News and ABC News found an underground network clustered in southern California promoting MMS on Facebook as a cure for ailments including cancer, Parkinsons, and autism in children.


:brickwallsmall:


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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1170

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Jan 29, 2018 12:13 pm

TRIFECTA
For the first time in 152 years, a supermoon, blue moon, and total lunar eclipse will coincide

Karen Hao January 26, 2018

On Jan. 31, it doesn’t matter what you’re doing—you owe it to yourself to gaze at the darkened sky.

In the early morning hours of the Western Hemisphere and the evening in the Eastern, you will be treated to both a visible supermoon—what we call a full moon at its closest orbital point to Earth—and a total lunar eclipse. The celestial coincidence hasn’t happened in more than 150 years. That means there were people who lived and died on this Earth without ever having had a chance to see this phenomenon, which won’t reappear again for another decade.

This supermoon also happens to be the final one in a supermoon trilogy—the first two of which appeared on Dec. 3 and Jan. 1. As the second full moon of the month, it earns the title of a blue moon as well.

And get ready for the blood moon


https://qz.com/1189777/a-supermoon-and- ... 152-years/



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1171

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:53 am

From a SciAm mailing
Trump's Tax Bill Seen as a "Poke in the Eye" to America's Solar Future
Are tariffs on solar panels and cuts to energy research preparing the U.S. for the inevitable growth in renewables?


By Larry Greenemeier on January 30, 2018
Trump's Tax Bill Seen as a "Poke in the Eye" to America's Solar Future

The Trump administration’s ambivalence—some might say hostility—toward science and research took a turn for the worse when the president signed a controversial new tax bill into law at the end of last year. Donald Trump’s first year in office was marked by questionable appointments to federal departments and agencies—including Scott Pruitt at the Environmental Protection Agency and Rick Perry at the Department of Energy (DoE)—that handle important policy decisions best informed by science. Large tax cuts added a blow to any hope Congress might be able to ease some of the steepest proposed budget cuts for fiscal year 2018, which would affect the EPA as well as the Agriculture and the Health and Human Services departments.

One of the administration’s stated goals in reducing corporate tax rates is to lure manufacturing and business investment back to the U.S. Apple, most notably, announced plans this month to open a new campus as part of a five-year, $30-billion U.S. investment plan, and will make about $38 billion in one-time tax payments on its overseas cash. Additional incentives to repatriate manufacturing operationscame last week, when the White House imposed a four-year increase in tariffs on imported solar panels.

Those tariffs, not to mention the budget and tax cuts, raise particularly interesting questions about the future of the energy sector—which for the past several years has marched toward radical change, as technological advances steadily beat down the cost of harvesting solar and wind energy. Scientific American spoke with Joshua Rhodes, a postdoctoral research fellow in The Webber Energy Group and at The University of Texas at Austin’s Energy Institute, about the potential impact of the Trump administration’s financial policies on energy research—and how the U.S. might better prepare itself to meet its future energy needs.

[An edited transcript of the conversation follows.]


https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... ar-future/



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1172

Post by Volkonski » Wed Feb 07, 2018 9:54 am

Mutant, all-female crayfish spreading rapidly through Europe can clone itself

https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... ssion=true
A voracious pest that mutated in a German aquarium and is marching around the world without the need for sexual reproduction may sound like science fiction, but a genetic study has revealed that a rapidly spreading all-female army of crayfish is descended from a single female and reproduces without any males.

The clonal freshwater crayfish is regarded as an invasive species which threatens endemic wild species, but its success may help scientists better understand how cancer spreads.

Researchers have been surprised by the marbled crayfish’s reproductive success and remarkable adaptability, with genetically identical crayfish now thriving in the wild in diverse habitats from subtropical Madagascar to Sweden, Japan and German cities including Hanover and Heidelberg.

Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center used genome sequencing and comparative studies of individual animals to prove that the all-female offspring of the marbled crayfish are genetically identical, in a study published in Nature, Ecology & Evolution.
The good news is that they are edible.


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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1173

Post by Volkonski » Wed Feb 07, 2018 10:21 am

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-01624-y
Julia Jones, a conservation scientist at Bangor University, UK, led the team that first surveyed the spread of marbled crayfish in Madagascar after their discovery in 20074. She says that the species’ spread is due largely to their popularity as a food source. In 2009, she met a man on a bus carrying a plastic bag full of them that he planned to dump into his rice fields in the hope of creating a sustainable stock, she says.

Stopping their spread in Madagascar will be “almost impossible”, says Lyko. Collaborators there have begun campaigns urging people not to transport them or release them into rice fields. The message is a hard sell in a country where poverty levels are high and marbled crayfish are a cheap and popular source of protein. Lyko’s colleague brought a few dozen that she had caught to a family barbecue. “This went down quite well,” he says.
We can eat our way out of this problem. Quick, get Louisiana crawfish recipes to Europe and Africa ASAP. ;)


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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1174

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Feb 07, 2018 11:10 am

Volkonski wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 10:21 am
https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-01624-y
Julia Jones, a conservation scientist at Bangor University, UK, led the team that first surveyed the spread of marbled crayfish in Madagascar after their discovery in 20074. She says that the species’ spread is due largely to their popularity as a food source. In 2009, she met a man on a bus carrying a plastic bag full of them that he planned to dump into his rice fields in the hope of creating a sustainable stock, she says.

Stopping their spread in Madagascar will be “almost impossible”, says Lyko. Collaborators there have begun campaigns urging people not to transport them or release them into rice fields. The message is a hard sell in a country where poverty levels are high and marbled crayfish are a cheap and popular source of protein. Lyko’s colleague brought a few dozen that she had caught to a family barbecue. “This went down quite well,” he says.
We can eat our way out of this problem. Quick, get Louisiana crawfish recipes to Europe and Africa ASAP. ;)
We already have a problem with a US red crayfish of sorts here, near to threee decades I think. They decimate the local fish population and the local crawfish population. (A stupid it burns fact: the critters like to settle in protected habitat areas and fishing for them is heavily regulated to forbidden :brickwallsmall: )



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1175

Post by Volkonski » Sat Feb 10, 2018 11:04 am

More about the marbled crayfish. This crayfish species did not exist 25 years ago. It is an example of a new species evolving very recently. Some evolution deniers like to say that we have never observed a new species come into existence. That wasn't true even before the marbled crayfish. However the marbled crayfish is a wonderful example of ongoing evolution in a complex creature. :thumbs:

Evolution happens.

This Mutant Crayfish Clones Itself, and It’s Taking Over Europe

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/05/scie ... &smtyp=cur
Before about 25 years ago, the species simply did not exist. A single drastic mutation in a single crayfish produced the marbled crayfish in an instant.

The mutation made it possible for the creature to clone itself, and now it has spread across much of Europe and gained a toehold on other continents. In Madagascar, where it arrived about 2007, it now numbers in the millions and threatens native crayfish.

“We may never have caught the genome of a species so soon after it became a species,” said Zen Faulkes, a biologist at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, who was not involved in the new study.

The marbled crayfish became popular among German aquarium hobbyists in the late 1990s. The earliest report of the creature comes from a hobbyist who told Dr. Lyko he bought what were described to him as “Texas crayfish” in 1995.


Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

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