Microsoft Linux

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Re: Microsoft Linux

#26

Post by Addie » Sun Sep 20, 2015 10:14 am

Linux Insider
Microsoft Rolls Its Own Linux Distro

Microsoft on Thursday announced that it is building its own Linux distribution to manage cloud networks.

Through the Azure Cloud Switch, or ACS, Microsoft aims to help network operators rapidly add the network features they need, while avoiding changes that would increase risk and complexity, said Kamala Subramaniam, principal architect for Azure Networking. ...

The Azure Cloud Switch is a Linux-based cross-platform modular operating system for data center networking. It provides a much faster way to debug, fix, and test software bugs, Subramaniam pointed out.

It gives Microsoft the flexibility to scale down the software and develop the features required for its data center and networking needs. ...

Why build a Linux distribution rather than rely on available proprietary software?

"Microsoft developing its own Linux-based network integration layer for Azure is an endeavor that targets Microsoft's ability to be a cloud," said Pat Kerpan, CEO of Cohesive Networks.
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Re: Microsoft Linux

#27

Post by Flatpointhigh » Sat Oct 03, 2015 1:49 pm

wonder if it will as filled with security holes as windowsOS.

I run ubuntu 14.04 on a ASUS notebook. the only real issue is the lack of memory (2Gigs) and the lack of hardware upgradeability. and, it's hatred of Java, flash no longer supported, HTML5 not supported, wifi stops functioning, and the random instability in so-called "stable releases" of browsers and other programs.

Other than that, I love it.

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Re: Microsoft Linux

#28

Post by Addie » Sun Oct 04, 2015 11:37 am

About Flash, Flatpoint, have you tried installing Google Chrome browser? I still mainly use Firefox, but I got tired of it screwing around with Flash, so I use Chrome to watch streaming video, because Chrome comes with Flash already built in. Works very well on 14.04-based systems like yours.
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Re: Microsoft Linux

#29

Post by Flatpointhigh » Sun Oct 04, 2015 8:07 pm

Addie wrote:About Flash, Flatpoint, have you tried installing Google Chrome browser? I still mainly use Firefox, but I got tired of it screwing around with Flash, so I use Chrome to watch streaming video, because Chrome comes with Flash already built in. Works very well on 14.04-based systems like yours.
I use chrome, but it too has javascript issues.

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Re: Microsoft Linux

#30

Post by Flatpointhigh » Mon Oct 05, 2015 6:57 pm

As long as this is a LINUX thread... any geeks here that know why cleaning APT as root will not let me clear the 28GIGBYTE temp directory? I get "ERROR: permission denied"

and, no I will not -rm all

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Re: Microsoft Linux

#31

Post by rpenner » Tue Oct 06, 2015 4:12 am

Flatpointhigh wrote:As long as this is a LINUX thread... any geeks here that know why cleaning APT as root will not let me clear the 28GIGBYTE temp directory? I get "ERROR: permission denied"

and, no I will not -rm all
You should never remove /tmp because it is a system directory, the existence of which is assumed by many programs. If you have already spent time removing directories, you many have damaged your system's ability to boot.

Type df -H (or -k) and you will likely see that /tmp is a filesystem mount point, perhaps to tmpfs -- an in-memory filesystem that gets zeroed out at boot time. Another thing that can prevent root from removing a directory is when that directory is the current working directory for a running process.

What's bad about /tmp is not file size but old files because it can be used as a garbage dump over time.
If stuff is hiding in subdirectories, you can find the big stuff with du -k /tmp | sort -n which puts larger directories at the bottom and can reveal patterns. The command ls -sa /tmp | sort -n does the same thing for top-level files.

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Re: Microsoft Linux

#32

Post by Dr. Blue » Tue Oct 06, 2015 7:38 am

rpenner wrote:
Flatpointhigh wrote:As long as this is a LINUX thread... any geeks here that know why cleaning APT as root will not let me clear the 28GIGBYTE temp directory? I get "ERROR: permission denied"

and, no I will not -rm all
You should never remove /tmp because it is a system directory, the existence of which is assumed by many programs. If you have already spent time removing directories, you many have damaged your system's ability to boot.
The apt cache is not stored in /tmp, so it can't be a /tmp issue. The cache is in /var/cache/apt/ - but no, you really should not delete files directly, because the files should match up with the database that keeps track of the files.

Flatpoinhigh: If you really and truly are root when you run this, then "apt-get clean" should get rid of everything. If you're at a shell prompt, type "id" to make sure you really are root - it should say something like "uid=0(root) gid=0(root) groups=0(root)". If you're not root, then you'll need to do "sudo apt-get clean".

There are things that can actually get in the way of even root doing this successfully, but they generally don't cause problems (aren't even enabled by default).

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Re: Microsoft Linux

#33

Post by Addie » Tue Oct 06, 2015 8:54 am

I've never done "apt-get clean" - is it something I should be doing? How often? Or only when there's a reason?
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Re: Microsoft Linux

#34

Post by DryInk » Tue Oct 06, 2015 10:16 am

Addie wrote:I've never done "apt-get clean" - is it something I should be doing? How often? Or only when there's a reason?
I copied this response from askubuntu.com
From the manpage of apt-get.

Code: Select all

clean clears out the local repository of retrieved package files. It removes everything but the lock file from  /var/cache/apt/archives/ and /var/cache/apt/archives/partial/. When APT is used as a dselect(1) method, clean is run automatically. Those who do not use dselect will likely want to run apt-get clean from time to time to free up disk space.
Note the emphasized line. You should run apt-get clean from time to time.

The answer is no, it does no harm, not at all.
Let's just assume I said something witty.

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Re: Microsoft Linux

#35

Post by Addie » Tue Oct 06, 2015 12:13 pm

Thanks. Usually I mess around with a system only when something seems to be going wrong. Fortunately, a rare event, knock knock, but it's generally easy enough to search out a solution and apply it to a problem. My HD is fairly large and 8GB of RAM, so I don't worry much about what is taking up space, as long as it's all clicking happily away. I do have a load of old kernels I wouldn't mind dumping. I'll read up a little on "apt-get clean" later. Thanks again.
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Re: Microsoft Linux

#36

Post by Flatpointhigh » Tue Oct 06, 2015 3:29 pm

rpenner wrote:
Flatpointhigh wrote:As long as this is a LINUX thread... any geeks here that know why cleaning APT as root will not let me clear the 28GIGBYTE temp directory? I get "ERROR: permission denied"

and, no I will not -rm all
You should never remove /tmp because it is a system directory, the existence of which is assumed by many programs. If you have already spent time removing directories, you many have damaged your system's ability to boot.

Type df -H (or -k) and you will likely see that /tmp is a filesystem mount point, perhaps to tmpfs -- an in-memory filesystem that gets zeroed out at boot time. Another thing that can prevent root from removing a directory is when that directory is the current working directory for a running process.

What's bad about /tmp is not file size but old files because it can be used as a garbage dump over time.
If stuff is hiding in subdirectories, you can find the big stuff with du -k /tmp | sort -n which puts larger directories at the bottom and can reveal patterns. The command ls -sa /tmp | sort -n does the same thing for top-level files.
dont' want to remove the apt temp, just clear it of the 28GIGs of slough. it''s definetly in the APT because that's where the error is happening.
everything else is clean save for that one directory.

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Re: Microsoft Linux

#37

Post by Flatpointhigh » Tue Oct 06, 2015 3:31 pm

Dr. Blue wrote:
rpenner wrote:
Flatpointhigh wrote:As long as this is a LINUX thread... any geeks here that know why cleaning APT as root will not let me clear the 28GIGBYTE temp directory? I get "ERROR: permission denied"

and, no I will not -rm all
You should never remove /tmp because it is a system directory, the existence of which is assumed by many programs. If you have already spent time removing directories, you many have damaged your system's ability to boot.
The apt cache is not stored in /tmp, so it can't be a /tmp issue. The cache is in /var/cache/apt/ - but no, you really should not delete files directly, because the files should match up with the database that keeps track of the files.

Flatpoinhigh: If you really and truly are root when you run this, then "apt-get clean" should get rid of everything. If you're at a shell prompt, type "id" to make sure you really are root - it should say something like "uid=0(root) gid=0(root) groups=0(root)". If you're not root, then you'll need to do "sudo apt-get clean".

There are things that can actually get in the way of even root doing this successfully, but they generally don't cause problems (aren't even enabled by default).
I run as sudo.

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Re: Microsoft Linux

#38

Post by Flatpointhigh » Tue Oct 06, 2015 7:47 pm

Screenshot to illustrate the problem
grrrr.png
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Re: Microsoft Linux

#39

Post by rpenner » Tue Oct 06, 2015 8:41 pm

Maybe sudo lsof +D /root/tmp3.... would reveal running processes which are holding the directory as in-use.

The alternative would be some extended flags that set the ACLs on some file beyond the ability of the root user to delete.

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Re: Microsoft Linux

#40

Post by Dr. Blue » Wed Oct 07, 2015 10:23 am

Flatpointhigh wrote:Screenshot to illustrate the problem
grrrr.png
While this is a little dangerous, I'd probably just manually remove the file/directory ("sudo rm -rf /root/tmp*" should do it - be very careful typing that command!). I don't know what would create a tmp file in /root rather than in /tmp, but it (probably!) isn't needed for anything. In general, any file with "tmp" in the name should be OK to delete without lasting damage (the name hints that it is only temporary, after all).

Like I said, it's a little dangerous if you don't know what this file actually is. If you want a safer approach, move it to a different directory (I usually create a directory named "hide" or something like that and move it there) and run your system for a while to make sure there are no problems. If it causes a problem, you can move it back - if it doesn't cause any problems, then go ahead and kill the file.

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Re: Microsoft Linux

#41

Post by Flatpointhigh » Wed Oct 07, 2015 1:42 pm

Dr. Blue wrote:
Flatpointhigh wrote:Screenshot to illustrate the problem
grrrr.png
While this is a little dangerous, I'd probably just manually remove the file/directory ("sudo rm -rf /root/tmp*" should do it - be very careful typing that command!). I don't know what would create a tmp file in /root rather than in /tmp, but it (probably!) isn't needed for anything. In general, any file with "tmp" in the name should be OK to delete without lasting damage (the name hints that it is only temporary, after all).

Like I said, it's a little dangerous if you don't know what this file actually is. If you want a safer approach, move it to a different directory (I usually create a directory named "hide" or something like that and move it there) and run your system for a while to make sure there are no problems. If it causes a problem, you can move it back - if it doesn't cause any problems, then go ahead and kill the file.
I know. that's why I haven't -rm'd it. What's maddening, is that I am running a root, and still can't clear that directory. don't want to remove the directory, just want to clear the 28 gigs of stuff that's occupying it.

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Re: Microsoft Linux

#42

Post by Flatpointhigh » Wed Oct 14, 2015 11:57 am

solved the problem by just restoring to factory, and then upgrading to 14.04. everything is copacetic :dance:

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Re: Microsoft Linux

#43

Post by Addie » Mon May 06, 2019 11:23 pm

Ars Technica
Windows 10 will soon ship with a full, open source, GPLed Linux kernel

The new Windows Subsystem for Linux will use a real Linux kernel.


Earlier today, we wrote that Microsoft was going to add some big new features to the Windows Subsystem for Linux, including native support for Docker containers. It turns out that that ain't the half of it.

The current Windows Subsystem for Linux uses a Microsoft-authored kernel component that provided the same kernel API as the Linux kernel but written from scratch by Microsoft. Essentially, it translated from Linux APIs to Windows NT kernel APIs. That worked pretty well, but the current subsystem had a few shortcomings: there was no ability to use Linux drivers, in particular file system drivers. Its file system performance, layered on top of Windows' own NTFS, was often 20 times slower than a real Linux kernel. It was also a relatively old version of the kernel; it offered approximately the set of APIs that Linux 4.4 did, and that was released in 2016. Some APIs aren't implemented at all, and others are only partially implemented to meet the needs of specific applications.

All is changing with Windows Subsystem for Linux 2. Instead of emulating the Linux kernel APIs on the NT kernel, WSL 2 is going to run a full Linux kernel in a lightweight virtual machine. This kernel will be trimmed down and tailored to this particular use case, with stripped-down hardware support (since it will defer to the host Windows OS for that) and faster booting.

The Linux kernel is GPLed open source; the GPL license requires that any modifications made to the code must be published and made available under the GPL license. Microsoft will duly comply with this, publishing the patches and modifications it makes to the kernel. WSL 2 will also use a similar split as the current WSL does: the kernel component will be shipped with Windows while "personalities" as provided by the various Linux distributions can be installed from the Microsoft Store.

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