Hacking & Cracking

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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#51

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Thu Feb 04, 2016 7:16 pm

Dr. Blue wrote:
RTH10260 wrote:
If you've been redeeming your dollar Frostys like crazy this month (as you should!), you might want to check your bank account. The purveyors of pulled pork fries are currently investigating a possible breach in the company's security system after customers reported fraudulent charges to their credit and debit cards.

According to cybersecurity expert Brian Krebs-who was the first to discover Target's megawatt data breach back in 2013-Wendy's is looking into "unusual activity" on said cards in some locations. "Fraudulent charges may have occurred elsewhere after the cards were legitimately used at some of our restaurants," Wendy's spokesman Bob Bertini told Krebs. Bertini also said that the burger chain has since hired a security firm to investigate.
http://news.yahoo.com/youve-eaten-wendy ... 38045.html
OK, this is interesting for two reasons. First, as someone who almost never eats fast food: pulled pork fries? Really? That's a thing?

Second, and more seriously, does anyone know if Wendys has switched over to chip readers instead of magnetic stripe? I know that the plan was that after some time in the Fall (Nov 1? something like that), any merchant who hadn't converted to the more secure technology would be liable for fraud and not the bank. If that's the case (deadline didn't get delayed, and Wendys didn't upgrade) this could be very expensive for Wendys.

I'll probably did into this a bit...
I have no idea about brick and mortar merchants, but those of us who use the Square were notified that we wouldn't be charged the violation fee because the chip readers were on back order or something. We ordered ours in June I think, and it hasn't arrived yet. And my understanding is that chip cards aren't required until the current mag cards expire so even if they have the chip readers it shouldn't be an issue with them using mag card readers for mag cards. The chip readers don't work with the mag cards.



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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#52

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Feb 12, 2016 6:26 pm

only a few years before Win10 ;)


[liveleak]560129dc3784[/liveleak]

ETA this should have gone into the Win10 thread, tsk tsk.



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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#53

Post by RTH10260 » Sat Mar 05, 2016 11:17 am

The ingenuity of the bad guys, first time seen this way:


[liveleak]b7a3a221477a[/liveleak]



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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#54

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Mar 16, 2016 1:03 am

How to fix a credit card skimmer onto a shop terminal
(Miami Beach gas station)


[liveleak]be4076708871[/liveleak]



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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#55

Post by Addie » Thu May 05, 2016 8:34 am

Computer World

Researchers nab millions of stolen credentials for Gmail, Hotmail, Yahoo, banking

What’s the going rate for usernames and passwords of 272.3 million stolen accounts, many of which are email accounts? A young Russian hacker wanted 50 rubles, which is less than $1, but ended up handing over the data after researchers posted positive comments about him in social media.

Many of the “hundreds of millions of hacked usernames and passwords for email accounts and other websites,” were for Russia’s Mail.ru, according to Reuters, but some “Google, Yahoo and Microsoft email users” were also affected.

Breakdown of stolen credentials

As for the breakdown, Alex Holden, founder and chief information security officer of Hold Security, told Reuters, 40 million, or 15% of the 272 million unique IDs, were Yahoo Mail credentials; 33 million, or 12%, were for Microsoft Hotmail accounts; 24 million, or 9%, were from Gmail.

'The Collector' hacker had 1.17 billion stolen credentials

The discovery of millions of stolen credentials doesn’t stop there. Hold Security said a Russian kid had collected 1.17 billion stolen credentials from various breaches. Of those, 272 million were unique; the researchers said that translated into “42.5 million credentials – 15% of the total” that they had not seen before.


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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#56

Post by RTH10260 » Sat Jun 25, 2016 2:48 pm

recently in Vienna
Finding an ATM Skimmer in Vienna
While on vacation with his family in Austria, this man went to go grab some cash from an ATM outside of St. Steven's cathedral in Vienna. As a safety precaution, the man tugged at the card reader for fear of scammers and found that the reader popped right off, revealing an expertly made card skimmer that was custom made for that specific ATM machine.

[liveleak]0294726f6909[/liveleak]



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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#57

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Jul 01, 2016 8:29 pm

1.2 million infected: Android malware 'Hummer' could be biggest trojan ever
Security researchers recently issued warnings against a trojan family known as Hummer, which affects more than a million phones by installing malware and unwanted apps.
By Conner Forrest | June 30, 2016, 6:21 AM PST

Security researchers at Cheetah Mobile Security Research Lab believe they could have discovered one of the largest trojan families of all time, affecting millions of Android devices around the world when it was in full swing.
More: http://www.techrepublic.com/article/1-2 ... ojan-ever/



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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#58

Post by Foggy » Fri Jul 01, 2016 9:10 pm

Thanks, Richard. But the numbers make no sense.

If it was infecting "1.4 million devices daily," then it infected a hell of a lot more than 1.2 million devices. If it was doing "63,000 daily infections in China alone," it would have infected 1.2 million devices in just 20 days in China alone.

I think they meant 1.2 billion with a B. Otherwise the numbers don't add up.


Mr. William L. Bryan is the root of a great deal of criminal mischief. And yet, Mr. Bryan remains at large.

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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#59

Post by RTH10260 » Sat Jul 09, 2016 8:44 am

and more from China (where is tRump on this?):
HummingBad malware infects 10 million Android devices, millions more at risk
A new malware called HummingBad, associated with Chinese cyber criminals Yingmob, has infected millions of devices and brings in millions of dollars of fake ad revenue.
By Conner Forrest | July 5, 2016, 8:24 AM PST

When it comes to malware, Android users can't seem to catch a break. According to mobile threat researchers from Check Point, a cyber security solutions provider, a recently-discovered Android malware called HummingBad has infected 10 million Android devices worldwide.

Yes, you read that correctly—10 million devices. But, that is just the beginning. Millions more devices could be at risk from HummingBad, or other malware created by the company behind it.

This latest information Check Point researchers gathered on HummingBad was released on July 1 in From HummingBad to Worse, a report detailing what the team had learned about the malware. HummingBad was first discovered in February, and it "establishes a persistent rootkit on Android devices, generates fraudulent ad revenue, and installs additional fraudulent apps," according to the report. Currently, it's estimated to be generating $300,000 per month in fraudulent ad revenue.

The party behind HummingBad is a group Chinese cyber criminals known as Yingmob. The group has 25 employees across four different groups that maintain the components of HummingBad. Furthermore, they also provide legitimate advertising analytics products and share their tools and resources among their teams. Yingmob is also suspected to be behind the iOS malware called Yispecter.
http://www.techrepublic.com/article/hum ... e-at-risk/



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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#60

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Dec 14, 2016 6:00 pm

Yahoo the second....
Yahoo reveals they suffered ANOTHER hack in 2013 that stole data from more than one billion users
  • Hackers stole data from more than one billion user accounts in August 2013
  • A different breach from one disclosed in September of 500 million accounts
  • Stolen info may include names, emails, phone numbers, birthdates and security questions and answers
  • The company still doesn't know how the data from the accounts was stolen
By Associated Press
PUBLISHED: 22:13 GMT, 14 December 2016 | UPDATED: 22:29 GMT, 14 December 2016

Yahoo says it believes hackers stole data from more than one billion user accounts in August 2013.

The Sunnyvale, California, company says it's a different breach from the one it disclosed in September, when it said 500 million accounts were exposed.

That new hack revelation raises questions about whether Verizon will try to change the terms of its $4.8 billion proposed acquisition of Yahoo.

Yahoo says the information stolen may include names, email addresses, phone numbers, birthdates and security questions and answers.

The company says it believes bank-account information and payment-card data were not affected.

Yahoo said an unauthorized third party had stolen the data in the latest breach and that it was working closely with law enforcement.

Yahoo’s chief information security officer Bob Lord says that the company hasn’t been able to determine how the data from the one billion accounts was stolen
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... ounts.html



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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#61

Post by Notorial Dissent » Thu Dec 15, 2016 1:19 pm

Can't say that is even remotely reassuring for anyone concerned.


The fact that you sincerely and wholeheartedly believe that the “Law of Gravity” is unconstitutional and a violation of your sovereign rights, does not absolve you of adherence to it.

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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#62

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Dec 15, 2016 3:28 pm

Notorial Dissent wrote:Can't say that is even remotely reassuring for anyone concerned.
The most endangered items are the security question and answers for password/account recovery that got stolen.

Should anyone still have those in use, go to your Yahoo account and delete them after adding an alternate email address or SMS phone number for password/account recovery. Yahoo has been phasing them out, so one has not been able to change the Q/A pair for a while.



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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#63

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Dec 28, 2016 12:46 pm

Adding this one here, cause hacking baggage locks is much like hacking software
The last TSA master key has been hacked

JULY 27, 2016 Katie Armstrong

In a move to prove a point about security, a group of hackers have released blueprints to 3D print the eighth and last TSA master key this week at a conference in New York.

If you are unfamiliar, TSA approved locks allow luggage security personnel to unlock and inspect your bags without damaging locks, using master keys. There are two companies that design these locks, Travel Sentry, which outsources seven lock designs to other manufacturers, and Safe Skies which produces their own lock.

In 2014, the Washington Post inadvertently published an article which included a high resolution photo of all seven Travel Sentry TSA master keys. The photo has since been removed from the article, but not before someone was able to digitally recreate the keys, and then share the files. Less than a year later, 3D printed copies emerged, making all Travel Sentry locks essentially useless against theft. A hacker named Xylit0l used the high-quality public images and more data to make 3D printable copies of the Travel Sentry master keys. DarkSim905, Johnny Xmas and another hacker later added to the project with some fixes.

The Safe Skies key was more difficult to reproduce, with zero images of it being publicly available. However, because they only make one master key, all their locks contained the data needed.
http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/last ... ked-90268/



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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#64

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Dec 28, 2016 12:53 pm

and in reference to above (the key hacking):
TSA Doesn’t Care That Its Luggage Locks Have Been Hacked

Jenna McLaughlin September 17 2015, 6:51 p.m.

In a spectacular failure of a “back door” designed to give law enforcement exclusive access to private places, hackers have made the “master keys” for Transportation Security Administration-recognized luggage locks available to anyone with a 3D printer.

The TSA-recognized luggage locks were a much-vaunted solution to a post-9/11 conundrum: how to let people lock their luggage, on the one hand, but let the TSA inspect it without resorting to bolt cutters, on the other.

When the locks were first introduced in 2003, TSA official Ken Lauterstein described them as part of the agency’s efforts to develop “practical solutions that contribute toward our goal of providing world-class security and world-class customer service.”

Now that they’ve been hacked, however, TSA says it doesn’t really care one way or another.

“The reported ability to create keys for TSA-approved suitcase locks from a digital image does not create a threat to aviation security,” wrote TSA spokesperson Mike England in an email to The Intercept.

“These consumer products are ‘peace of mind’ devices, not part of TSA’s aviation security regime,” England wrote.

“Carried and checked bags are subject to the TSA’s electronic screening and manual inspection. In addition, the reported availability of keys to unauthorized persons causes no loss of physical security to bags while they are under TSA control. In fact, the vast majority of bags are not locked when checked in prior to flight.”

In other words: not our problem.
https://theintercept.com/2015/09/17/tsa ... ks-hacked/



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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#65

Post by vic » Thu Dec 29, 2016 3:43 am

Like the TSA said, their definition of security is to be able to quickly and easily examine the contents of the luggage.

I suspect most luggage locks are useless whether they can be opened by the TSA or not. It's not hard to open a suitcase if you're willing to do obvious damage. Or just steal the thing.

And in some cases they can be laughingly useless.

I had a Samsonite attache case back in the late 60's. I had forgotten the key once, and tried to pick the lock, and was able to open it with a paper clip. But I didn't have to use any lock-picking techniques, I just had to stick a plain (not bent or modified at all) paper clip into the key hole. I ended up putting a paper clip on my key chain and getting rid of the Samsonite key. The paper clip was smaller and lighter, and actually easier to use, since it didn't have to be precisely aligned with the key hole.

If you go for example to ebay vintage samsonite keys you'll see they all appear to be cut the same. But even that is misleading. The lock didn't operate off the "teeth", it was the flat side opposite which unlocked it.



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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#66

Post by Flatpointhigh » Thu Dec 29, 2016 4:10 pm

Joint Analysis Report:



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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#67

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Mar 15, 2017 1:58 pm

Russian Spies Charged in Massive Yahoo Email Hack
by KEN DILANIAN

The Justice Department announced charges Wednesday against two Russian spies and two hackers behind the 2014 theft of data connected to half a billion Yahoo accounts, which officials called one of the largest known data breaches in American history.

The four men together face 47 criminal charges, including conspiracy, computer fraud, economic espionage, theft of trade secrets and aggravated identity theft, the Justice Department said in a news release.

One of them, Karim Baratov, 22, a Canadian and Kazakh national and a resident of Canada, was arrested in Canada on Tuesday, said Mary McCord, acting assistant attorney general for national security.

Also charged were two agents of Russia's Federal Security Service, known as the FSB. They are Dmitry Aleksandrovich Dokuchaev, 33, a Russian national and resident, and Igor Anatolyevich Sushchin, 43, a Russian national and resident.

The other defendant, Alexsey Alexseyevich Belan, 29, a Russian national and resident, was already among the FBI's most wanted cyber criminals, McCord said.
http://www.nbcnews.com/tech/tech-news/r ... ck-n733716



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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#68

Post by Addie » Fri Dec 22, 2017 10:09 am

Associated Press
Russian hackers targeted more than 200 journalists globally ...

The AP identified journalists as the third-largest group on a hacking hit list obtained from cybersecurity firm Secureworks, after diplomatic personnel and U.S. Democrats. About 50 of the journalists worked at The New York Times. Another 50 were either foreign correspondents based in Moscow or Russian reporters like Lobkov who worked for independent news outlets. Others were prominent media figures in Ukraine, Moldova, the Baltics or Washington.

The list of journalists provides new evidence for the U.S. intelligence community's conclusion that Fancy Bear acted on behalf of the Russian government when it intervened in the U.S. presidential election. Spy agencies say the hackers were working to help Republican Donald Trump. The Russian government has denied interfering in the American election.

Previous AP reporting has shown how Fancy Bear — which Secureworks nicknamed Iron Twilight — used phishing emails to try to compromise Russian opposition leaders, Ukrainian politicians and U.S. intelligence figures, along with Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta and more than 130 other Democrats.

Lobkov, 50, said he saw hacks like the one that turned his day upside-down in December 2015 as dress rehearsals for the email leaks that struck the Democrats in the United States the following year.

"I think the hackers in the service of the Fatherland were long getting their training on our lot before venturing outside."


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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#69

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Dec 22, 2017 11:36 am

Alteryx data leak exposes 123 million households: What you need to know
Authored by a Symantec employee

More than 120 million U.S. households had information exposed in a data leak, potentially raising the risk of identity theft for the impacted American families.
Here’s what happened:

Cybersecurity company Upguard said it discovered the exposed data on Oct. 6, 2017, in a cloud-based repository, and made its discovery public on Dec. 19, 2017.

The repository that was exposed contained a range of U.S. household data from Alteryx, an Irvine, California-based marketing and data analytics company.

Alteryx’s data sets appeared to belong to Experian, a credit reporting agency.

Upguard alerted Alteryx about the exposed data sets, and Alteryx secured the database last week, according to a Forbes article.

What household data was exposed?

The data included 248 fields of information for each household. The information ranged from addresses and income to ethnicity and personal interests. Details included contact information, mortgage ownership, financial histories and whether a household contained a dog or cat enthusiast.

https://us.norton.com/internetsecurity- ... llion.html



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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#70

Post by Addie » Sat Dec 23, 2017 10:15 am

CNN
Romanian hackers infiltrated 65% of DC's outdoor surveillance cameras

Washington (CNN)Two Romanian hackers infiltrated nearly two-thirds of the outdoor surveillance cameras in Washington, DC, as part of an extortion scheme, according to federal court documents.

In a criminal complaint filed last week in the US District Court for the District of Columbia, the US government alleges that the two Romanian hackers operating outside the United States infiltrated 65% of the outdoor surveillance cameras operated by DC city police — that's 123 cameras out of 187 in the city. The alleged hacking occurred during a four-day period in early January.

The hacking suspects, Mihai Alexandru Isvanca and Eveline Cismaru, are also accused of using the computers behind the surveillance cameras to distribute ransomware through spam emails, according to an affidavit by Secret Service agent James Graham in support of the government's criminal complaint. The affidavit alleges the hackers meant to use the malware to lock victims' computers and then extort payments from them to regain access.

In the affidavit, the Romanians are accused of "intent to extort from persons money and other things of value, to transmit in interstate and foreign commerce communications containing threats to cause damage to protected computers."


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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#71

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Dec 26, 2017 4:42 am

Window 10 users please keep an eye on the update Microsoft ought to send real soon now
Windows 10 bundles a briefly vulnerable password manager
Keeper exposed punters to drive-by click-jack pwnage
By Richard Chirgwin 18 Dec 2017 at 03:04 27 Reg comments SHARE ▼

Google Project Zero's Tavis Ormandy has turned up a howling blunder in a password manager bundled with Windows 10.

On Friday, Ormandy publicly disclosed the bug, which lies not in the Microsoft operating system but in an included third-party Keeper password manager.

He wrote: “I've heard of Keeper, I remember filing a bug a while ago about how they were injecting privileged UI into pages (issue 917). I checked and, they're doing the same thing again with this version. I think I'm being generous considering this a new issue that qualifies for a ninety day disclosure, as I literally just changed the selectors and the same attack works.“

A full description of the bug is in the older issue Ormandy linked to. It can be exploited by a malicious webpage to read an arbitrary password that would be inserted into a site's login form by Keeper's browser extension.

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/12/1 ... dles_vuln/



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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#72

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Jan 04, 2018 6:51 am

Kernel panic! What are Meltdown and Spectre, the bugs affecting nearly every computer and device?
Posted 9 hours ago by Devin Coldewey

If you’re confused by the avalanche of early reports, denials, and conflicting statements about the massive security issues announced today, don’t worry — you’re far from the only one. Here’s what you need to know about Meltdown and Spectre, the two huge bugs that affect practically every computer and device out there.

What are these flaws?

Short answer: Bugs at a fundamental level that allow critical information stored deep inside computer systems to be exposed.

Security researchers released official documentation — complete with nicknames and logos — of two major flaws found in nearly all modern central processing units, or CPUs.

It’s not a physical problem with the CPUs themselves, or a plain software bug you might find in an application like Word or Chrome. It’s in between, at the level of the processors’ “architectures,” the way all the millions of transistors and logic units work together to carry out instructions.

In modern architectures, there are inviolable spaces where data passes through in raw, unencrypted form, such as inside the kernel, the most central software unit in the architecture, or in system memory carefully set aside from other applications. This data has powerful protections to prevent it from being interfered with or even observed by other processes and applications.

Meltdown and Spectre are two techniques researchers have discovered that circumvent those protections, exposing nearly any data the computer processes, such as passwords, proprietary information, or encrypted communications.

https://techcrunch.com/2018/01/03/kerne ... nd-device/



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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#73

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Jan 04, 2018 6:52 am

“Meltdown” and “Spectre”: Every modern processor has unfixable security flaws
Immediate concern is for Intel chips, but everyone is at risk.

PETER BRIGHT - 1/4/2018, 1:30 AM

Windows, Linux, and macOS have all received security patches that significantly alter how the operating systems handle virtual memory in order to protect against a hitherto undisclosed flaw. This is more than a little notable; it's been clear that Microsoft and the Linux kernel developers have been informed of some non-public security issue and have been rushing to fix it. But nobody knew quite what the problem was, leading to lots of speculation and experimentation based on pre-releases of the patches.

Now we know what the flaw is. And it's not great news, because there are in fact two related families of flaws with similar impact, and only one of them has any easy fix.

The flaws have been named Meltdown and Spectre. Meltdown was independently discovered by three groups—researchers from the Technical University of Graz in Austria, German security firm Cerberus Security, and Google's Project Zero. Spectre was discovered independently by Project Zero and independent researcher Paul Kocher.

https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2018/01 ... ity-flaws/



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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#74

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Jan 05, 2018 8:25 am

For once the software giant has a eak spot of its own, discovered by a third party, not their own security researchers...
A vulnerability in Google Apps Script could have allowed attackers to use Google Drive as a means of discreetly delivering malware to unsuspecting victims.

TECH PRO RESEARCH

Google Apps Script is a JavaScript-based language used for the creation of add-ons and extensions for applications in the Google ecosystem, including Docs, Sheets, Slides, and Forms. The code editor is available in the Chrome browser and the official Apps Script website details how the scripts run on Google servers.

Uncovered by Proofpoint, threat actors exploiting this vulnerability could use it to drop any form of malware on a machine -- although such attacks have yet to be observed in the wild.

Researchers found that that Google Apps Script and the document-sharing capabilities within Google supported automatic malware downloads and the ability to socially engineer the victims into executing the malicious file once delivered. They also discovered that it was possible to trigger this type of attack without any input from the end user.

Ultimately, the vulnerability allows attacks to use legitimate Google Drive invitation lures combined with the ability to distribute malware stored on Google Drive.

http://www.zdnet.com/article/google-app ... r-malware/



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Re: Hacking & Cracking

#75

Post by Addie » Fri Jan 12, 2018 11:48 am

Associated Press
Cybersecurity firm: US Senate in Russian hackers' crosshairs

PARIS (AP) — The same Russian government-aligned hackers who penetrated the Democratic Party have spent the past few months laying the groundwork for an espionage campaign against the U.S. Senate, a cybersecurity firm said Friday.

The revelation suggests the group often nicknamed Fancy Bear, whose hacking campaign scrambled the 2016 U.S. electoral contest, is still busy trying to gather the emails of America's political elite.

"They're still very active — in making preparations at least — to influence public opinion again," said Feike Hacquebord, a security researcher at Trend Micro Inc., which published the report . "They are looking for information they might leak later."

The Senate Sergeant at Arms office, which is responsible for the upper house's security, declined to comment.

Hacquebord said he based his report on the discovery of a clutch of suspicious-looking websites dressed up to look like the U.S. Senate's internal email system. He then cross-referenced digital fingerprints associated with those sites to ones used almost exclusively by Fancy Bear, which his Tokyo-based firm dubs "Pawn Storm."


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