Cyber Security

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tek
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Re: Cyber Security

#176

Post by tek » Fri Jun 01, 2018 5:13 am

Off Topic
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There's no way back
from there to here

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Re: Cyber Security

#177

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Jun 14, 2018 8:23 pm

For the record only, special MS patch has already been sent out
Cortana Software Could Help Anyone Unlock Your Windows 10 Computer
Wednesday, June 13, 2018 Swati Khandelwal

Cortana, an artificial intelligence-based smart assistant that Microsoft has built into every version of Windows 10, could help attackers unlock your system password.

With its latest patch Tuesday release, Microsoft has pushed an important update to address an easily exploitable vulnerability in Cortana that could allow hackers to break into a locked Windows 10 system and execute malicious commands with the user's privileges.

In worst case scenario, hackers could also compromise the system completely if the user has elevated privileges on the targeted system.

The elevation of privilege vulnerability, tracked as CVE-2018-8140 and reported by McAfee security researchers, resides due to Cortana's failure to adequately check command inputs, which eventually leads to code execution with elevated permissions.
:snippity:
Microsoft has classified the flaw as "important" because exploitation of this vulnerability requires an attacker to have physical or console access to the targeted system and the targeted system also needs to have Cortana enabled

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Re: Cyber Security

#178

Post by Addie » Thu Jun 21, 2018 10:58 am

Ars Technica: China-based hackers burrow inside satellite, defense, and telecoms firms

Hackers may have sought ability to disrupt consumer and business communications.
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Re: Cyber Security

#179

Post by Addie » Thu Jul 19, 2018 7:13 pm

Cross-posting

WaPo
Justice Department plans to alert public to foreign operations targeting U.S. democracy

The Justice Department plans to alert the public to foreign operations targeting U.S. democracy under a new policy designed to counter hacking and disinformation campaigns such as the one Russia undertook in 2016 to disrupt the presidential election.

The government will inform American companies, private organizations and individuals that they are being covertly attacked by foreign actors attempting to affect elections or the political process.

“Exposing schemes to the public is an important way to neutralize them,” said Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein, who announced the policy at the Aspen Security Forum in Colorado, according to prepared remarks. “The American people have a right to know if foreign governments are targeting them with propaganda.” ...

“The Russian effort to influence the 2016 presidential election is just one tree in a growing forest,” Rosenstein said. “Focusing merely on a single election misses the point.”

He cited Director of National Intelligence Daniel Coats, who last Friday said Russia’s actions continued. “As Director Coats made clear, “these actions are persistent, they are pervasive, and they are meant to undermine America’s democracy on a daily basis, regardless of whether it is election time or not,’ “ Rosenstein said.
Adding:
Justice.gov/ag: REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S CYBER DIGITAL TASK FORCE
NBC News: Deputy AG Rosenstein details DOJ efforts to fight election meddling

"The First Amendment does not preclude us from publicly identifying and countering foreign government-sponsored propaganda."
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Re: Cyber Security

#180

Post by Whatever4 » Thu Jul 19, 2018 11:47 pm

From Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.p ... &width=500
This is not a political post, it's a request for a few people I love and respect to think critically, and frankly, wake the hell up in regards to their dismissal of what happened in Helsinki.

Most of you aren't aware, but my former career involved protecting global networks from hacking. Among the entities under our protection were most of the Fortune 500 companies, US stock markets, infrastructure (banks, power grids, agriculture, railroads, airlines, and shipping companies), and numerous US Government/Military agencies. Every day, hundreds of us watched over much of what makes America run; thanks to Russia, it was never a dull day.

From my first day, we learned that Public Enemy #1 was Russia --not China, North Korea, bored teens, corporate espionage, nor rogue Islamist states. We were even encouraged to learn Russian, since it was helpful for much of our work. This was not arbitrary, it was based solely on 20 years of empirical evidence. Since record keeping began, 76% of all recorded attacks on our clients originated from state-backed actors operating from Russia, former Soviet satellites, and (scariest of all), the United States. On any given day, I would personally deal with ~10 infiltration attempts from these groups. The scariest incident I saw was when a suspected FSB (Federal Security Service) group from Volograd tried to access a flight-tracking system, like the one that tracks the thousands of planes currently above our heads. The intrusion was blocked and nothing happened, but it easily could have. By the time I left a few years later, there were 6 more attempts exactly like that. What was their intent? I have no idea. That was way above my pay grade, but clearly they weren't there to admire all the pretty flight paths of our airplanes.

Then there was the time a Russian hacker got into a stock market and tried to corrupt trading data for US-owned companies. Fortunately, it was stopped and nothing bad happened, but it easily could have.

Or how about the time another Russian hacker tried to delete the cargo manifests for some of the largest global shipping companies? Imagine 15,000 container ships showing up at their ports and having no record of their cargo. Again, it was stopped and nothing bad happened, but it easily could have.

These scary events were all in a day's work. But even scarier, our government and military have centers like this doing the same job for far more sensitive targets, and they are also constantly under attack. Sure, other belligerent nations do their fair share of nosing around, but one constant is that even after the rise of China and North Korea, Russia remains responsible for the majority of these crimes --and they happen Every. Single. Day.

What you need to understand is that Russia has a plan that works and they are not stupid. Their leadership still has the same expansionist mindset they've had for decades, and means to accomplish their goals by destabilizing the United States by any means possible. Why? Because we are the only entity capable of keeping them in check. If we're too busy backbiting and alienating our allies, they're free to do what they wish without consequence. That's why when I see a President making petty, denigrating comments against our NATO allies, I can't help but imagine a victory party taking place inside the Kremlin Senate.

Make no mistake: while we're no longer in a nuclear standoff, Russia is not our friend, and Putin certainly has no love for us or our institutions. In fact, he has a 40+ year documented history of showing nothing but contempt for our country, not to mention the sovereignty of numerous other nations. Former presidents have realized this danger, and relied upon the Intelligence community to deal with it accordingly. The current president has not. His embarrassing and bumbling deference to Putin has no doubt emboldened those tasked to further the Putin agenda.

How do I know this? Common sense, for starters. Oh, and I asked my former coworker Mark yesterday how the numbers were since the Helsinki summit (i.e. Confirmed Russian hacking attempts) . His response? "Up 250% Super busy atm will get back to you". I haven't heard back yet, and don't expect I will any time soon.

So, whether you choose to accept my story or not, this is where we stand. Though I had a tiny window into an extremely complex world, it's clear to me: we are losing an undeclared war, and unless this policy of idiotic, dismissive "non-policy" changes immediately, attacks on our country are only going to escalate, and we're all going to pay the price.

Don't believe me? Just watch.
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Re: Cyber Security

#181

Post by Addie » Mon Jul 23, 2018 11:06 am

Vanity Fair: Forget the Summit: How Trump Let Putin Win the Cyber-Security War

Trump’s continued denial of Russian election interference sets a dangerous precedent in this era of cyber-warfare—and practically guarantees that it will happen again.
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Re: Cyber Security

#182

Post by Addie » Tue Jul 24, 2018 8:32 am

The Hill
DHS: Russian hackers got into control rooms of US utilities

Russian hackers were able to penetrate the control rooms of hundreds of U.S. utilities last year as part of a campaign against power company vendors that could be ongoing, The Wall Street Journal reported Monday.

Department of Homeland Security (DHS) officials told the Journal that hackers working for a state-sponsored group known as Dragonfly or Energetic Bear were able to get inside the networks of U.S. utilities to the point that they could have disrupted power service and caused blackouts.

“They got to the point where they could have thrown switches” said Jonathan Homer, chief of industrial-control-system analysis for DHS.

The department did not disclose which companies were victimized by the hacks, but indicated there were hundreds affected by the breach. Other companies reportedly may still be unaware they were part of the breach because the hackers may have broke in using employee credentials.

The U.S. government had previously accused Russia of staging a multi-year cyberattack campaign against the energy grid and other elements of critical infrastructure in the United States.
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Re: Cyber Security

#183

Post by tencats » Mon Aug 13, 2018 6:43 pm

Early Florida Voters' confidence undermined by hacking headlines
https://www.wtsp.com/article/news/polit ... -583697065
Monday marked the first day of early voting in Florida’s primaries, and some voters say they’re just not as confident as they would like to be in the process.

From Russian hacking to warnings from Florida’s senators, and now, reports that an 11-year old was able to hack into a replica of Florida’s election website.

“I guess I’m not that confident, but I don’t think I can do much about it personally,” said Marlene Rubin, planning to cast her ballot at an early voting location in Tampa. “So, I just do the best I can to vote and get people to vote and advocate for my candidates.”

More than ever, voter confidence is being undermined.
MORE: 11-year-old hacks replica of Florida state website, changes election results. :o https://www.wtsp.com/article/news/natio ... 5d420caf00
The safety of our election systems didn't exactly earn a vote of confidence following this weekend's DefCon hacking conference in Las Vegas. One session reportedly featured an 11-year-old who successfully hacked into a replica website for the Florida Secretary of State and changed election results.

It took the young hacker only 10 minutes to break in and gain access.

The child took part in a DefCon Voting Machine Hacking Village, PBS reports, where kids as young as eight years old attempted to access replica web pages and change information.

"These websites are so easy to hack we couldn’t give them to adult hackers — they’d be laughed off the stage," said Jake Braun, a former White House liaison for the Department of Homeland Security in an interview with ABC News. Braun said the conference invited younger hackers to DefCon because it would be a "waste of time" showcasing experts hacking these sites.

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Re: Cyber Security

#184

Post by pipistrelle » Mon Aug 13, 2018 9:47 pm

My parents used to pull levers inside a curtained box. What the levers did I don't know.

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Re: Cyber Security

#185

Post by Addie » Tue Aug 14, 2018 12:22 pm

Engadget: FBI warns banks about ATM cash-out scheme

With this method, hackers can quickly steal large sums of money.
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Re: Cyber Security

#186

Post by Addie » Thu Sep 13, 2018 8:45 pm

Bloomberg
Cyberattack Pings Data Systems of At Least Four Gas Networks

At least four U.S. pipeline companies have seen their electronic systems for communicating with customers shut down over the last few days, with three confirming it resulted from a cyberattack.

On Tuesday, Oneok Inc., which operates natural gas pipelines in the Permian Basin in Texas and the Rocky Mountains region, said it disabled its system as a precaution after determining that a third-party provider was the “target of an apparent cyberattack."

A day earlier, Energy Transfer Partners LP, Boardwalk Pipeline Partners LP, and Chesapeake Utilities Corp.’s Eastern Shore Natural Gas reported communications breakdowns, with Eastern Shore saying its outage occurred on March 29. The Department of Homeland Security, which said Monday it was gathering information about the attacks, had no immediate comment Tuesday.

“We do not believe any customer data was compromised,” said the Latitude Technologies unit of Energy Services Group, which Energy Transfer and Eastern Shore both identified as their third-party provider. “We are investigating the re-establishment of this data,” Latitude said in a message to customers.

The company wasn’t ready to make a statement or discuss the details of the service disruption yet, Carla Roddy, marketing director at Energy Services Group, said in a brief interview at the company’s headquarters in Norwell, Massachusetts.

The attacks follow a U.S. government warning in March that Russian hackers are conducting an assault on the U.S. electric grid and other targets. Last month, Atlanta’s government was hobbled by a ransomware attack.
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Re: Cyber Security

#187

Post by Addie » Wed Sep 19, 2018 2:32 pm

Tech Crunch
Hackers have planted credit card stealing malware on local government payment sites

Security firm FireEye has confirmed that a widely used web payment portal used to pay for local government services, like utilities and permits, has been targeted by hackers.

Hackers have broken into self-hosted Click2Gov servers operated by local governments across the US, likely using a vulnerability in the portal’s web server that allowed the attacker to upload malware to siphon off payment card data over a period of “weeks to numerous months,” Nick Richard, principal threat intelligence analyst at FireEye, told TechCrunch.

Superion, a major technology provider that owns the web payment portal Click2Gov, said in June following a confirmed breach last year that there was “no evidence” that the portal was unsafe to use amid reports of suspicious activity by customers. Superion issued patches after several customers complained that their credit card information had been stolen, but said that it was largely up to local governments and municipalities to patch their servers.

But since then, several more local government sites were identified as victims of the malware.
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Re: Cyber Security

#188

Post by Foggy » Mon Oct 01, 2018 10:28 am

Ol' Wifehorn needs an original birth certificate in order to get her Real ID license. So naturally, despite all the advice I have given her over the years, she clicked on the first link that popped up in Google.

Then she came to me to tell me that she accidentally gave all her personal identity information to a company that's in Spain that's not even really going to send her a birth certificate. And demanded that I fix it, because her identity is now at risk. So I asked if she was going to book a flight to Spain for me so I could go get her data back, but she didn't seem to think that was a good idea. She wants me to fix it without leaving the house.

Any ideas? She gave them SSN, mother's maiden name, birthday and probably driver's license, and she can't even remember everything else.

:?

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Re: Cyber Security

#189

Post by tek » Mon Oct 01, 2018 10:34 am

Lifelock or something similar.

That data is now out there, never gonna erase it all.
There's no way back
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Re: Cyber Security

#190

Post by Foggy » Mon Oct 01, 2018 10:39 am

tek wrote:
Mon Oct 01, 2018 10:34 am
That data is now out there, never gonna erase it all.
That's what I told her. It was the WRONG ANSWER. :blackeye: :bag:

.
Edit: :whisper: Oddly, telling her it wouldn't have happened if she had let me do it instead was the wrong answer, too. :confused:

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Re: Cyber Security

#191

Post by RoadScholar » Mon Oct 01, 2018 11:03 am

Ask her if she wants 50 other people to tell her that's the case. :towel:
The bitterest truth is healthier than the sweetest lie.
X3

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Re: Cyber Security

#192

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Oct 01, 2018 11:10 am

Foggy wrote:
Mon Oct 01, 2018 10:28 am
Ol' Wifehorn needs an original birth certificate in order to get her Real ID license. So naturally, despite all the advice I have given her over the years, she clicked on the first link that popped up in Google.

Then she came to me to tell me that she accidentally gave all her personal identity information to a company that's in Spain that's not even really going to send her a birth certificate. And demanded that I fix it, because her identity is now at risk. So I asked if she was going to book a flight to Spain for me so I could go get her data back, but she didn't seem to think that was a good idea. She wants me to fix it without leaving the house.

Any ideas? She gave them SSN, mother's maiden name, birthday and probably driver's license, and she can't even remember everything else.

:?
Ask her if she is happy to get a Spanish passport now and apply for a Green Card to live in the US with her husband? :twisted:

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Re: Cyber Security

#193

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Oct 02, 2018 8:49 am

Fancy Bear Attacks Governments Using LoJax UEFI Rootkit
Attacks can be blocked by enabling Secure Boot

Sep 28, 2018 11:08 GMT · By Sergiu Gatlan
ESET uncovered a new ongoing cyber attack, a UEFI rootkit being actively used by the Sednit (aka Fancy Bear) APT group to compromise governmental targets from Central and Eastern Europe.

The threat group behind the attack, also known as APT28, STRONTIUM, and Sofacy, are the first cybercriminals who successfully compromised computing systems using a UEFI rootkit.

Among Sednit's previous victims are the US Democratic National Committee (DNC), TV5Monde, the World Anti-Doping Agency, and a handful of other high profile targets.

As reported by ESET, "the LoJax rootkit was part of a campaign run by Fancy Bear against several high-profile targets in Central and Eastern Europe and is the first-ever publicly known attack of this kind."

LoJax attacks work by injecting a malicious UEFI module within the system's SPI flash memory which will download and run malware while the operating system boots up, providing the rootkit owner with administrator-level privileges on the compromised computer.

The biggest issue is that once LoJax successfully penetrates a computer's UEFI firmware, the rootkit will survive OS reinstalls and storage device changes.

Enabling Secure Boot is the best way to block LoJax from compromising your machine

There is very little regular users could do to mitigate such an infection, seeing that the only way you can get rid of it would be to re-flash the memory chips with a clean copy of the firmware, an operation only professionals should try, or change the computer's motherboard altogether.

Users with Secure Boot enabled will be protected by default since this Windows feature will automatically block any malicious software components from running while the operating system boots up.

If you haven't yet enabled Secure Boot on your device, you can do so by going into the UEFI systems and toggle on the Secure Boot system setting.


https://news.softpedia.com/news/fancy-b ... 2953.shtml
also: https://securityboulevard.com/2018/09/l ... berattack/

detailed analysis in this PDF https://www.welivesecurity.com/wp-conte ... -LoJax.pdf


Note: UEFI is the modern days BIOS. The vulnerability is a hook within it that enables OEMs and OS vendors to implement a locator for stolen PCs, especially notebooks. The bad guys use this hook to introduce malware instead. As part of that procedure they will patch / reflash the UEFI(BIOS) and even when the computer is rebooted or a OS is (re)installed the malware can reestablish itself. Prevention: the UEFI has a setting to disactivate this functionality (boot into BIOS mode at startup of machine).

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Re: Cyber Security

#194

Post by Addie » Fri Oct 05, 2018 8:05 am

CNBC
Chinese spy chips are found in hardware used by Apple, Amazon, Bloomberg says; Apple, AWS say no way

Data center equipment run by Amazon Web Services and Apple may have been subject to surveillance from the Chinese government via a tiny microchip inserted during the equipment manufacturing process, according to a Bloomberg BusinessWeek report on Thursday. The claims in the report have been strongly disputed by the technology giants.

The chips, which Bloomberg said have been the subject of a top secret U.S. government investigation starting in 2015, were used for gathering intellectual property and trade secrets from American companies and may have been introduced by a Chinese server company called Super Micro that assembled machines used in the centers.

Apple, AWS and Super Micro dispute the report. Apple said it did not find the chips as asserted by BusinessWeek — which cited anonymous government and corporate sources. Super Micro reportedly denied that it introduced the chips during the manufacturing.
Also:
Tech Crunch: Bloomberg’s spy chip story reveals the murky world of national security reporting

Today’s bombshell Bloomberg story has the internet split: either the story is right, and reporters have uncovered one of the largest and jarring breaches of the U.S. tech industry by a foreign adversary… or it’s not, and a lot of people screwed up.

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Re: Cyber Security

#195

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Oct 05, 2018 8:23 am

Addie wrote:
Fri Oct 05, 2018 8:05 am
CNBC
Chinese spy chips are found in hardware used by Apple, Amazon, Bloomberg says; Apple, AWS say no way

:snippity: .
:snippity:
CNBC is reporting wrongly. Amazon/AWS detected the tampering while aquring a company, they never installed those crippeled servers themselves. The aquired company dropped those servers when the manipulation came to light. Apple was likely already phasing the internally used server line out and did speed the process up when they heard of the problems. Apple only used the tampered servers for a specific application (central SIRIsupporting funcionality).

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Re: Cyber Security

#196

Post by Dr. Blue » Fri Oct 05, 2018 8:33 am

RTH10260 wrote:
Tue Oct 02, 2018 8:49 am
Fancy Bear Attacks Governments Using LoJax UEFI Rootkit
Attacks can be blocked by enabling Secure Boot

Sep 28, 2018 11:08 GMT · By Sergiu Gatlan
ESET uncovered a new ongoing cyber attack, a UEFI rootkit being actively used by the Sednit (aka Fancy Bear) APT group to compromise governmental targets from Central and Eastern Europe.
:snippity:
Enabling Secure Boot is the best way to block LoJax from compromising your machine
:snippity:
also: https://securityboulevard.com/2018/09/l ... berattack/

detailed analysis in this PDF https://www.welivesecurity.com/wp-conte ... -LoJax.pdf


Note: UEFI is the modern days BIOS. The vulnerability is a hook within it that enables OEMs and OS vendors to implement a locator for stolen PCs, especially notebooks. The bad guys use this hook to introduce malware instead. As part of that procedure they will patch / reflash the UEFI(BIOS) and even when the computer is rebooted or a OS is (re)installed the malware can reestablish itself. Prevention: the UEFI has a setting to disactivate this functionality (boot into BIOS mode at startup of machine).
Using BIOS mode boot is not going to protect you from this. The only real protection is the part that I left in the article above - turn on Secure Boot.

Unfortunately, that's not an option for those of us that like to experiment with operating systems and install different Linux distros. But if you want to boot Windows and only Windows, then Secure Boot is an excellent protection.

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Re: Cyber Security

#197

Post by Dr. Blue » Fri Oct 05, 2018 8:36 am

Addie wrote:
Fri Oct 05, 2018 8:05 am
Tech Crunch: Bloomberg’s spy chip story reveals the murky world of national security reporting

Today’s bombshell Bloomberg story has the internet split: either the story is right, and reporters have uncovered one of the largest and jarring breaches of the U.S. tech industry by a foreign adversary… or it’s not, and a lot of people screwed up.
As I posted over in the "Hacking & Cracking" thread, I'm more on the side of "it's not, and a lot of people screwed up." There are just too many "conspiracy theory" alarm bells that go off in my mind when I read that story.

My "conspiracy theory" alarm bells are a natural part of my work, but they have also been finely honed by years reading stories here on the Fogbow. :-D

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Re: Cyber Security

#198

Post by Addie » Fri Oct 05, 2018 8:46 am

I keep meaning to ask Foggy to combine the two threads. (Honestly :geezerette: I'm happy if I remember to put the garbage out.) I don't want Sue's title to be lost in the merger.

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Re: Cyber Security

#199

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Oct 05, 2018 9:06 am

Addie wrote:
Fri Oct 05, 2018 8:46 am
I keep meaning to ask Foggy to combine the two threads. (Honestly :geezerette: I'm happy if I remember to put the garbage out.) I don't want Sue's title to be lost in the merger.
I have been using this Cyber Security for general posings on this issue, while reporting in Hacking and Kracking on real new security breaches and freshly discovered intrusions hacks. YMMV

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Re: Cyber Security

#200

Post by Foggy » Fri Oct 05, 2018 11:26 am

Umm, Addie, you started this thread in February 2013 and SueDB didn't start the other one until December that year. If I merge them, you will have the first post (and your title will be the title}. You can change the title after the merge, is that OK?

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