A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#26

Post by tek » Tue Oct 02, 2018 6:28 pm

RTH10260 wrote:
Tue Oct 02, 2018 6:06 pm
Volkonski wrote:
Tue Oct 02, 2018 12:59 pm
That's why the company I retired from maintains complete backups of all data in three sites on three continents.
It's my understanding that Microsoft did not lose any data. Only their datacenters crashed and required hardware replacements, after which servers would again get loaded with the duplicates from other surviving srevers, ready for a merrygoround with the next storm. The lesson for customers is that even big names cannot garantee permanent availability of services with the cloud concept.
As I read it, in the end they did not lose any data. But it took a lot of effort to not lose data - some had to be recovered from the media in the affected datacenters.

A problem with live systems is that "complete backups" are not sufficient, and "not losing data" is not sufficient. You need to be transactionally consistent with all other systems you've committed to (or who have committed to you), affected or unaffected. You also need to stay transactionally consistent with transactions that you yourself are continuing to do on non-impaired parts of your system. And you need to do this in a way that you can take advantage of distributed processing when things are working as planned.

A part of my work involves enterprise and cloud storage providers. It is truly amazing how many allegedly bright Computer Science folks have no clue on this stuff..
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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#27

Post by Judge Roy Bean » Tue Oct 02, 2018 11:14 pm

Data loss prevention is a specialty that requires seriously experienced professional oversight. Traditional "backups" are becoming less and less relevant in the cloud world. Managing redundancy isn't simple.

There is an expectation that cloud service providers are able to ensure recovery in some kind of catastrophic event and they are, for the most part. But service providers are not infallible; the crooks don't give up easily. And ransomware is not going to go away because it works.

If you like to keep up on these issues, I recommend krebsonsecurity dot com as an authoritative source.
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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#28

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Oct 03, 2018 3:07 pm

Wi-Fi is rebranding itself: Here's how to understand the new naming
The Wi-Fi Alliance group has announced new names for common Wi-Fi specifications, to help eliminate confusion around the standards.

By Conner Forrest | October 3, 2018, 7:05 AM PST

Tech is full of confusing acronyms and abbreviations, and Wi-Fi standards are some of the most difficult to understand. To simplify the specifications and standards, the Wi-Fi Alliance trade group has announced a new naming system for these Wi-Fi standards.

According to a Wednesday press release, the new approach will name the generations in a numerical sequence relative to new advancements in Wi-Fi technology. This will make it easier for vendors to denote which standards their devices support, for service providers to explain what their network offers, and for users to understand which products work with which standards.

Each evolution of Wi-Fi technology brings advances in speed and throughput. However, it's often difficult to understand each standard at a glance, due to their reliance on a string of numbers and letters to designate their generation.

Based on the new naming standards, here's what the new Wi-Fi names will look like:

802.11n technology will now be referred to as Wi-Fi 4
802.11ac technology will now be referred to as Wi-Fi 5
802.11ax technology will now be referred to as Wi-Fi 6


"For nearly two decades, Wi-Fi users have had to sort through technical naming conventions to determine if their devices support the latest Wi-Fi," Wi-Fi Alliance CEO Edgar Figueroa said in the release. "Wi-Fi Alliance is excited to introduce Wi-Fi 6, and present a new naming scheme to help industry and Wi-Fi users easily understand the Wi-Fi generation supported by their device or connection."

The release also noted that UI designers can use the new terminology in their products to help users understand what standard they're connected to in real-time. The new naming system will go into effect with the Wi-Fi 6 certification, which is due to be released in 2019.


https://www.techrepublic.com/article/wi ... ew-naming/

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#29

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Oct 19, 2018 10:12 am

WikiLeaks Publishes What It Says Is a List of Amazon Data Centers

• WikiLeaks published what it said was a list of all Amazon Web Services data centers, including their addresses
• If accurate, the list would be the most detail the public has ever seen about the world’s biggest cloud provider’s infrastructure
• The leak’s purpose is unclear, but the organization mentioned the $10 billion Department of Defense cloud contract, for which AWS is currently a leading bidder
• In 2010, AWS pulled the plug on the hosting services it was providing to WikiLeaks, citing terms-of-use violations
Yevgeniy Sverdlik | Oct 12, 2018


WikiLeaks has published a document it says lists all Amazon Web Services data centers and their addresses.

It’s unclear how accurate the information in the document is. It lists data centers by code name, addresses, and in many cases names of the colocation providers operating the facilities. According to the document, the data is recent as of October 2015. Amazon has launched more data centers since then.

It lists 38 buildings in Northern Virginia; eight in Seattle; eight in the San Francisco Bay Area; seven in northeastern Oregon; seven in Dublin, Ireland; three in Luxembourg; four in Germany; nine in China; 12 in Japan; six in Singapore; eight in Australia; and six in Brazil.

An AWS spokesperson did not respond to a request for comment in time for publication.

If the information in the document is real, it would be the most detail about AWS data centers ever released to the public. Unless they're data center providers, companies are usually extremely secretive about their data center locations, and AWS is more secretive than most others.


https://www.itprotoday.com/amazon-web-s ... ta-centers

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#30

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Nov 22, 2018 7:06 pm

While surfing the web, viewing an interesting video on Youtube, I became aware of the following website that collects and archives stuff from way back into the 1980s and onward, the BBS things etc.

http://textfiles.com/
T E X T F I L E S
On the face of things, we seem to be merely talking about text-based files, containing only the letters of the English Alphabet (and the occasional punctuation mark).
On deeper inspection, of course, this isn't quite the case. What this site offers is a glimpse into the history of writers and artists bound by the 128 characters that the American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) allowed them. The focus is on mid-1980's textfiles and the world as it was then, but even these files are sometime retooled 1960s and 1970s works, and offshoots of this culture exist to this day.

Where are the Files? Who are You? Why does this Matter?
What was it Like? How can I Help?
Companion site https://www.archiveteam.org/

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#31

Post by Flatpointhigh » Thu Nov 22, 2018 7:08 pm

RTH10260 wrote:
Thu Nov 22, 2018 7:06 pm
While surfing the web, viewing an interesting video on Youtube, I became aware of the following website that collects and archives stuff from way back into the 1980s and onward, the BBS things etc.

http://textfiles.com/
T E X T F I L E S
On the face of things, we seem to be merely talking about text-based files, containing only the letters of the English Alphabet (and the occasional punctuation mark).
On deeper inspection, of course, this isn't quite the case. What this site offers is a glimpse into the history of writers and artists bound by the 128 characters that the American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) allowed them. The focus is on mid-1980's textfiles and the world as it was then, but even these files are sometime retooled 1960s and 1970s works, and offshoots of this culture exist to this day.

Where are the Files? Who are You? Why does this Matter?
What was it Like? How can I Help?
Companion site https://www.archiveteam.org/
:like: :like: :like:

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#32

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Dec 10, 2018 3:59 pm

50 years ago, 'the mother of all demos' foretold our tech future
Doug Engelbart gave the world its first taste of hypertext, a mouse, networking and more.

Steve Dent, @stevetdent

Innovation usually happens in slow, measured steps over many years, but a demo in 1968 transformed the world of personal computers in just 90 minutes. In a presentation dubbed "the mother of all demos," Douglas Engelbart showed off technology that would lead directly to Apple's Macintosh, the internet, Windows, Google Docs, the computer mouse and much, much more. The most insane part was that it happened 50 years ago in 1968, when microchips were just a gleam in scientists' eyes.

Engelbart, who died in 2013, was working at the Stanford Research Institute (SRI) at Menlo Park when he presented the demo at a San Francisco computer meetup via video conference. That alone was an impressive technical feat (showing what was essentially the first version of Skype), but what was to come in the next 90 minutes changed things forever.

"If in your office, you as an intellectual worker, were supplied with a computer display backed up by a computer that was alive for you all day and was instantly responsive to every action you have, how much value could you derive from that?" Engelbart asked. "Well, this basically characterizes what we've been pursuing for many years in what we call augmented human intellect research center at the Stanford Research Institute."


https://www.engadget.com/2018/12/10/mot ... niversary/


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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#33

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Dec 10, 2018 4:09 pm

The Onion has of course its very own special reporting....
The Computer Mouse Turns 50
Wednesday 10:25am

On Dec. 9, 1968, engineer Douglas Engelbart introduced the computer mouse at a product demo, bringing one of the essential elements of the personal computer to the public. The Onion looks back at the development of the computer mouse on its 50-year anniversary.

1506:
Leonardo da Vinci sketches rudimentary plans for a trackball.



https://www.theonion.com/the-computer-m ... 1830880010

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#34

Post by tek » Mon Dec 10, 2018 5:39 pm

A few years back ms.tek and I attended an excellent evening program at the Computer History Museum about Englebart's work at PARC.
Off Topic
daughter.tek actually met Englebart, when she was 10 years old.. I was attending a conference (SIGCHI), and they had a "kids" program that I enrolled my daughter in.. Englebart was giving a paper at the conference, and he spent a day working with the kids.. She also met and got to work with Brenda Laurel, the founder of Purple Moon (a company making computer games for young girls).. to her this was like meeting a rock star .. so she was walking on a cloud the entire trip ;)
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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#35

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Feb 08, 2019 12:14 am

Computerphile wrote: Published on 6 Feb 2019

Snake-like locomotion has all sorts of possible applications for robots. Dr Henry C. Astley from the Biomimicry Research & Innovation Center at the University of Akron, USA shows us their robo-snake.

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#36

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Feb 20, 2019 10:40 am

Target updates app after TV station reveals in-store price hikes
UPDATED ON: FEBRUARY 8, 2019 / 5:26 PM / CBS/AP

Target updated its smartphone app Wednesday night after a Minneapolis TV station reported that some prices displayed on the app increased whenever users approached a store. In one case, a product's price increased by almost $150.

After a viewer first complained about the price switch, KARE-TV started a two-month investigation into the criticism. After choosing 10 different items at random, station reporters kept an eye on the Target app and found that four of the items jumped in price when they walked into the store.

They found that an Apple Watch band went up $2, a Shark vacuum went up $40, a Graco child car seat jumped $72 and a Dyson vacuum shot up $148 on the app once inside the store. In total, the list of 10 items was $262 cheaper back in the parking lot.

The app never indicated changes were made.

After the report was broadcast, Target updated its app to clearly reflect "online" prices versus "in-store" prices next to each product on the app.

"We appreciate the feedback we recently received on our approach to pricing within the Target app," a Target spokesperson wrote in an emailed statement to KARE 11. "We've made a number of changes within our app to make it easier to understand pricing and our price match policy."

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#37

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Mar 19, 2019 3:22 pm

Facial recognition's 'dirty little secret': Millions of online photos scraped without consent
People’s faces are being used without their permission, in order to power technology that could eventually be used to surveil them, legal experts say

March 12, 2019, 9:32 AM GMT+1 / Updated March 17, 2019, 4:25 PM GMT+1
By Olivia Solon

Facial recognition can log you into your iPhone, track criminals through crowds and identify loyal customers in stores.

The technology — which is imperfect but improving rapidly — is based on algorithms that learn how to recognize human faces and the hundreds of ways in which each one is unique.

To do this well, the algorithms must be fed hundreds of thousands of images of a diverse array of faces. Increasingly, those photos are coming from the internet, where they’re swept up by the millions without the knowledge of the people who posted them, categorized by age, gender, skin tone and dozens of other metrics, and shared with researchers at universities and companies.

As the algorithms get more advanced — meaning they are better able to identify women and people of color, a task they have historically struggled with — legal experts and civil rights advocates are sounding the alarm on researchers’ use of photos of ordinary people. These people’s faces are being used without their consent, in order to power technology that could eventually be used to surveil them.


https://www.nbcnews.com/tech/internet/f ... ed-n981921

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#38

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Mar 26, 2019 10:37 am

Y2K is back again - shapeshifting its way into your life ;)
Fun fact: GPS uses 10 bits to store the week. That means it runs out... oh heck – April 6, 2019
Nav gadgets will be Gah, Properly Screwed if you don't or can't update firmware
By Shaun Nichols in San Francisco 12 Feb 2019 at 21:37 299 Reg comments

Older satnavs and such devices won't be able to use America's Global Positioning System properly after April 6 unless they've been suitably updated or designed to handle a looming epoch rollover.

GPS signals from satellites include a timestamp, needed in part to calculate one's location, that stores the week number using ten binary bits. That means the week number can have 210 or 1,024 integer values, counting from zero to 1,023 in this case. Every 1,024 weeks, or roughly every 20 years, the counter rolls over from 1,023 to zero.

The first Saturday in April will mark the end of the 1,024th week, after which the counter will spill over from 1,023 to zero. The last time the week number overflowed like this was in 1999, nearly two decades on from the first epoch in January 1980.

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/02/1 ... poch_ends/

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#39

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Apr 01, 2019 9:17 am

easyDNS: Social Justice Pricing Goes Into Effect Today
April 1, 2019 by Mark E. Jeftovic Leave a Comment


Background:
Owing to it’s nature as a hierarchical inverted tree, the DNS system is problematic in that it imposes a pseudo-scientific hegemony based on culturally unfounded technological determinism which constrains the labeling narratives for disadvantaged classes of people and devices.

DNS names, web addresses, Qtypes and Class Values are social constructs, those who initially formalized them via RFC authorship can garner unfair advantage over later participants who must follow arbitrary standards lest they endure marginalization and exclusion.

Action:
After extensive consultations with stakeholders, including disaffected groups and under-recognized normativities , easyDNS convened a committee toward a Fairness Memorandum and Learning (“FML”) to address systemic oppression in naming post-structuralism and neo-classical addressing deficiencies, with scope not limited to: discrimination, exploitation, hypersensitivity, hypermoralization, unequal outcomes and fragility.

The FML concluded that historical asymmetries would be attenuated through implementation of a tiered pricing structure that rectifies intersectional inequity.

By providing discounts on domains and DNS services for the historically disadvantaged, while charging additional premiums on same services to members of classes benefiting from unearned advantage and privilege, coerced assimilation into predefined technological constructs can be ameliorated.

The new social justice pricing structure is active immediately with retroactive effect.

To view pricing, please review the pricing matrix in section 2A:

(Important: locate your pricing quadrant according to your personally identified class attribution and not your birth-assigned markers)

[ View Pricing Table 2A ]


https://easydns.com/blog/2019/04/01/eas ... ect-today/

Disclaimer: I am a reader at this blog, the CEO of said company

Disclaimer: I am also a longtime happy customer of their once free service offer, grandfathered over.
► Show Spoiler

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#40

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Apr 14, 2019 8:55 pm

01DOGG01 wrote:
Published on 23 Nov 2012

Interesting old film detailing advancements in computer/digital technology, featuring the 'Graphic 1' computer system at Bell Telephone Laboratories.

Includes scenes of:
*Digital musical composition
*Electronic circuit design utilising a digital pen
*Digital movie production
*3D simulation of orbiting satellite
*Conversion of pictures to mosaics composed of tiny images
*Digital voice modulation

The Bell Labs 'Graphic 1' computer system consisted of a Digital Equipment Corporation 'PDP-5' computer coupled with input devices such as the 'Type 370' light pen and Teletype Corporation 'Teletype Model 33' keyboard, married to a Digital Equipment Corporation 'Type 340' precision incremental display backed by 36-bit Ampex 'RVQ' buffer memory capable of storing 4096 'words'. The resolution on the monitor was 1024×1024.

This system was designed to transform the graphics-based input into output to be fed into a IBM '7094' (200 Kflop/s). The entire thing was attached to a microfilm-based recorder - the Stromberg Carlson 'SC 4020', which took hours to read and record the data.


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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#41

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Apr 16, 2019 7:53 pm

UK - The babysitter government
Britain just laid out plans to end the internet's Wild West days and take a world-leading role in regulating big tech
Shona Ghosh Apr. 8, 2019, 2:00 AM
  • Britain wants to take a world-leading role in regulating the biggest tech companies.
  • The UK government says it wants to legislate for a new independent regulator that would oversee "harmful content" on social media, search engines, messaging, and file-sharing platforms.
  • It would be the UK's first time regulating online safety, with the internet conventionally seen as ungovernable.
  • Platforms that fail to keep hate speech and content relating to sexual abuse, violence, terrorism, or self-abuse off their services would face huge fines under the proposed rules.
  • Industry lobbying bodies representing Facebook, Google, and other big tech firms say the proposed laws are too vague and may harm competition.
The internet's days as the Wild West may be numbered.

The British government has laid out a blueprint for groundbreaking new laws that would regulate social media, search, messaging, and even file-sharing platforms for content found to cause "online harm." That umbrella term includes content relating to sexual abuse, violence, hate speech and terrorism, self-harm, and underage sexting.

The proposals, dubbed the world's "first online safety laws" in an emailed statement, coincide with global pressure on US tech firms to prevent terrorist propaganda, hate speech, and depictions of self-harm from appearing on their sites. It also comes at a time when Silicon Valley leaders like Mark Zuckerberg are calling for regulation.

Facebook, YouTube, and the more niche 8chan came in for severe criticism just last month when the Christchurch, New Zealand, attacker livestreamed the shootings at two mosques. In February, Instagram banned "extreme" images of self-harm after the suicide of the British teenager Molly Russell.

The proposals, put forward in a white paper by the UK's Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, call for a new independent regulator that would police these platforms for harmful content.

It will have the power to issue major fines and even hold individual executives responsible for failing to comply with any new laws. Fines could reach billions of dollars for the biggest companies, Culture Minister Margot James told Business Insider in February.

Tech firms would also need to obey a "duty of care," which would require them to take steps meant to keep users safe and to deal with illegal or harmful content.


https://www.businessinsider.com/dcms-wh ... dia-2019-4

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#42

Post by Judge Roy Bean » Tue Apr 16, 2019 9:06 pm

RTH10260 wrote:
Tue Apr 16, 2019 7:53 pm
UK - The babysitter government
:snippity:

The proposals, put forward in a white paper by the UK's Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, call for a new independent regulator that would police these platforms for harmful content.

It will have the power to issue major fines and even hold individual executives responsible for failing to comply with any new laws. Fines could reach billions of dollars for the biggest companies, Culture Minister Margot James told Business Insider in February.
Independent? :pigsfly:
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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#43

Post by RTH10260 » Sat May 18, 2019 6:06 am

for the geeks - an image gallery of ancient stuff (no - Sterngard is not among them afik)
Photos: Atari, Unix, ENIAC, and more from Vintage Computer Festival East 2019
By Evan Koblentz // May 17, 2019, 3:36 PM PST // technicallyevan

Vintage Computer Festival East 2019 was held May 3-5 at the InfoAge Science & History Center in Wall, NJ. The event featured dozens of hands-on exhibitions of historic computers, peripherals, and software.

This year's keynoters were Ken Thompson, of Bell Labs/Unix fame, and Joe Decuir, a hardware engineer from Atari/Amiga. In their honor, several of the exhibitors demonstrated Unix and Atari computers.

The InfoAge center is also home to a year-round computer museum hosted by the Vintage Computer Federation, which is the same nonprofit organization that leads the Festival series. The museum's artifacts include some gems such as various analog and digital mainframes from the 1950s-1960s--even a UNIVAC that formerly belonged to the US Navy.

Upcoming editions of the Vintage Computer Festival series include VCF West (Aug. 3-4, Silicon Valley) and VCF Midwest (Sept. 14-15, Chicago).



https://www.techrepublic.com/pictures/p ... east-2019/

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#44

Post by Foggy » Sat May 18, 2019 8:54 am

... even a UNIVAC that formerly belonged to the US Navy.
I did my 6th grade science project on a UNIVAC M460 that belonged to the US Navy.
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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#45

Post by tek » Sat May 18, 2019 6:40 pm

Computers were huge, owned by the govt, huge corporations, or universities..

and then..

https://www.computerhistory.org/revolut ... 1/331/1893
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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#46

Post by RTH10260 » Wed May 22, 2019 11:15 am

Where to report when Foggy did throw you unter the bridge or sent you to FEMA Camp
EFF Project Shows How People Are Unfairly “TOSsed Out” By Platforms’ Absurd Enforcement of Content Rules
Users Without Resources to Fight Back Are Most Affected by Unevenly-Enforced Rules
PRESS RELEASEMAY 20, 2019

San Francisco—The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) today launched TOSsed Out, a project to highlight the vast spectrum of people silenced by social media platforms that inconsistently and erroneously apply terms of service (TOS) rules.

TOSsed Out will track and publicize the ways in which TOS and other speech moderation rules are unevenly enforced, with little to no transparency, against a range people for whom the Internet is an irreplaceable forum to express ideas, connect with others, and find support.

This includes people on the margins who question authority, criticize the powerful, educate, and call attention to discrimination. The project is a continuation of work EFF began five years ago when it launched Onlinecensorship.org to collect speech takedown reports from users.


https://www.eff.org/press/releases/eff- ... nforcement

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#47

Post by RTH10260 » Wed May 22, 2019 11:44 am

Justice Department shuts dark web drug directory, arrests alleged owners
The two men accused of running DeepDotWeb allegedly earned millions in kickbacks for providing access to dark web marketplaces for illicit drugs.

May 8, 2019, 10:04 PM GMT+2
By Tom Winter and Adiel Kaplan

The Justice Department has shut down a major directory of dark web drug marketplaces and arrested the alleged owners in what federal prosecutors say is a first-of-its-kind operation.

"This is the single most significant law enforcement disruption of the darknet to date," U.S. Attorney Scott Brady said at a news conference Wednesday in Pittsburgh to announce the charges and the closing of the site DeepDotWeb.

The so-called darknet or dark web is a part of the internet that can be accessed only by specialized software or hardware and contains clandestine websites not found through normal search engines. DeepDotWeb was a regular searchable website that provided a directory with direct access to a host of darknet marketplaces selling illegal narcotics including fentanyl, cocaine, heroin and meth.

The website also provided access to marketplaces for firearms, including assault rifles, and for malicious software and hacking tools.

The alleged owners, Tal Prihar, 37, and Michael Phan, 34, both from Israel, were arrested Monday, Prihar in France and Phan in Israel, where they remain in custody. They each face a single count of money laundering conspiracy in the U.S. Phan also faces charges in Israel.


https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/justic ... s-n1003451

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#48

Post by Chilidog » Wed May 22, 2019 12:30 pm

Weak charges so far.

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#49

Post by RTH10260 » Wed May 22, 2019 2:18 pm

Chilidog wrote:
Wed May 22, 2019 12:30 pm
Weak charges so far.
The disruption of trade in the Dark Web will be much more important than having a day in court. It will take some time for those websites to get their customers back, especially linking up to new customers.

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#50

Post by RTH10260 » Thu May 23, 2019 6:08 pm

Jeff Bezos finally gets .Amazon after DNS overlord ICANN runs out of excuses to delay decision any further
Persistence pays off for online super-souk, but not for South American states
By Kieren McCarthy in San Francisco 21 May 2019 at 20:25

Analysis It's taken seven years but online mega-mall Amazon will finally get its hands on the .amazon top-level domain name.

That's the upshot of a meeting of DNS overseer ICANN last week in which the organization's board finally made a decision that it has repeatedly sought to avoid. Even the final resolution approving .amazon is written so opaquely that you could be forgiven for missing its import.

"The Board finds the Amazon corporation proposal of 17 April 2019 acceptable, and therefore directs the ICANN org President and CEO, or his designee(s), to continue processing of the .AMAZON applications according to the policies and procedures of the New gTLD Program," it reads.

The Jeff Bezos-run Amazon will likely get control of its internet namesake this summer. It intends to run it as a brand business with a small number of domain names that reflect its core businesses. So we may see internet addresses like "books.amazon" and "alexa.amazon" before the end of the year.


https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/05/2 ... ts_amazon/

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