A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

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tek
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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#26

Post by tek » Tue Oct 02, 2018 6:28 pm

RTH10260 wrote:
Tue Oct 02, 2018 6:06 pm
Volkonski wrote:
Tue Oct 02, 2018 12:59 pm
That's why the company I retired from maintains complete backups of all data in three sites on three continents.
It's my understanding that Microsoft did not lose any data. Only their datacenters crashed and required hardware replacements, after which servers would again get loaded with the duplicates from other surviving srevers, ready for a merrygoround with the next storm. The lesson for customers is that even big names cannot garantee permanent availability of services with the cloud concept.
As I read it, in the end they did not lose any data. But it took a lot of effort to not lose data - some had to be recovered from the media in the affected datacenters.

A problem with live systems is that "complete backups" are not sufficient, and "not losing data" is not sufficient. You need to be transactionally consistent with all other systems you've committed to (or who have committed to you), affected or unaffected. You also need to stay transactionally consistent with transactions that you yourself are continuing to do on non-impaired parts of your system. And you need to do this in a way that you can take advantage of distributed processing when things are working as planned.

A part of my work involves enterprise and cloud storage providers. It is truly amazing how many allegedly bright Computer Science folks have no clue on this stuff..


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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#27

Post by Judge Roy Bean » Tue Oct 02, 2018 11:14 pm

Data loss prevention is a specialty that requires seriously experienced professional oversight. Traditional "backups" are becoming less and less relevant in the cloud world. Managing redundancy isn't simple.

There is an expectation that cloud service providers are able to ensure recovery in some kind of catastrophic event and they are, for the most part. But service providers are not infallible; the crooks don't give up easily. And ransomware is not going to go away because it works.

If you like to keep up on these issues, I recommend krebsonsecurity dot com as an authoritative source.


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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#28

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Oct 03, 2018 3:07 pm

Wi-Fi is rebranding itself: Here's how to understand the new naming
The Wi-Fi Alliance group has announced new names for common Wi-Fi specifications, to help eliminate confusion around the standards.

By Conner Forrest | October 3, 2018, 7:05 AM PST

Tech is full of confusing acronyms and abbreviations, and Wi-Fi standards are some of the most difficult to understand. To simplify the specifications and standards, the Wi-Fi Alliance trade group has announced a new naming system for these Wi-Fi standards.

According to a Wednesday press release, the new approach will name the generations in a numerical sequence relative to new advancements in Wi-Fi technology. This will make it easier for vendors to denote which standards their devices support, for service providers to explain what their network offers, and for users to understand which products work with which standards.

Each evolution of Wi-Fi technology brings advances in speed and throughput. However, it's often difficult to understand each standard at a glance, due to their reliance on a string of numbers and letters to designate their generation.

Based on the new naming standards, here's what the new Wi-Fi names will look like:

802.11n technology will now be referred to as Wi-Fi 4
802.11ac technology will now be referred to as Wi-Fi 5
802.11ax technology will now be referred to as Wi-Fi 6


"For nearly two decades, Wi-Fi users have had to sort through technical naming conventions to determine if their devices support the latest Wi-Fi," Wi-Fi Alliance CEO Edgar Figueroa said in the release. "Wi-Fi Alliance is excited to introduce Wi-Fi 6, and present a new naming scheme to help industry and Wi-Fi users easily understand the Wi-Fi generation supported by their device or connection."

The release also noted that UI designers can use the new terminology in their products to help users understand what standard they're connected to in real-time. The new naming system will go into effect with the Wi-Fi 6 certification, which is due to be released in 2019.


https://www.techrepublic.com/article/wi ... ew-naming/



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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#29

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Oct 19, 2018 10:12 am

WikiLeaks Publishes What It Says Is a List of Amazon Data Centers

• WikiLeaks published what it said was a list of all Amazon Web Services data centers, including their addresses
• If accurate, the list would be the most detail the public has ever seen about the world’s biggest cloud provider’s infrastructure
• The leak’s purpose is unclear, but the organization mentioned the $10 billion Department of Defense cloud contract, for which AWS is currently a leading bidder
• In 2010, AWS pulled the plug on the hosting services it was providing to WikiLeaks, citing terms-of-use violations
Yevgeniy Sverdlik | Oct 12, 2018


WikiLeaks has published a document it says lists all Amazon Web Services data centers and their addresses.

It’s unclear how accurate the information in the document is. It lists data centers by code name, addresses, and in many cases names of the colocation providers operating the facilities. According to the document, the data is recent as of October 2015. Amazon has launched more data centers since then.

It lists 38 buildings in Northern Virginia; eight in Seattle; eight in the San Francisco Bay Area; seven in northeastern Oregon; seven in Dublin, Ireland; three in Luxembourg; four in Germany; nine in China; 12 in Japan; six in Singapore; eight in Australia; and six in Brazil.

An AWS spokesperson did not respond to a request for comment in time for publication.

If the information in the document is real, it would be the most detail about AWS data centers ever released to the public. Unless they're data center providers, companies are usually extremely secretive about their data center locations, and AWS is more secretive than most others.


https://www.itprotoday.com/amazon-web-s ... ta-centers



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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#30

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Nov 22, 2018 7:06 pm

While surfing the web, viewing an interesting video on Youtube, I became aware of the following website that collects and archives stuff from way back into the 1980s and onward, the BBS things etc.

http://textfiles.com/
T E X T F I L E S
On the face of things, we seem to be merely talking about text-based files, containing only the letters of the English Alphabet (and the occasional punctuation mark).
On deeper inspection, of course, this isn't quite the case. What this site offers is a glimpse into the history of writers and artists bound by the 128 characters that the American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) allowed them. The focus is on mid-1980's textfiles and the world as it was then, but even these files are sometime retooled 1960s and 1970s works, and offshoots of this culture exist to this day.

Where are the Files? Who are You? Why does this Matter?
What was it Like? How can I Help?
Companion site https://www.archiveteam.org/



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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#31

Post by Flatpointhigh » Thu Nov 22, 2018 7:08 pm

RTH10260 wrote:
Thu Nov 22, 2018 7:06 pm
While surfing the web, viewing an interesting video on Youtube, I became aware of the following website that collects and archives stuff from way back into the 1980s and onward, the BBS things etc.

http://textfiles.com/
T E X T F I L E S
On the face of things, we seem to be merely talking about text-based files, containing only the letters of the English Alphabet (and the occasional punctuation mark).
On deeper inspection, of course, this isn't quite the case. What this site offers is a glimpse into the history of writers and artists bound by the 128 characters that the American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) allowed them. The focus is on mid-1980's textfiles and the world as it was then, but even these files are sometime retooled 1960s and 1970s works, and offshoots of this culture exist to this day.

Where are the Files? Who are You? Why does this Matter?
What was it Like? How can I Help?
Companion site https://www.archiveteam.org/
:like: :like: :like:



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RTH10260
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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#32

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Dec 10, 2018 3:59 pm

50 years ago, 'the mother of all demos' foretold our tech future
Doug Engelbart gave the world its first taste of hypertext, a mouse, networking and more.

Steve Dent, @stevetdent

Innovation usually happens in slow, measured steps over many years, but a demo in 1968 transformed the world of personal computers in just 90 minutes. In a presentation dubbed "the mother of all demos," Douglas Engelbart showed off technology that would lead directly to Apple's Macintosh, the internet, Windows, Google Docs, the computer mouse and much, much more. The most insane part was that it happened 50 years ago in 1968, when microchips were just a gleam in scientists' eyes.

Engelbart, who died in 2013, was working at the Stanford Research Institute (SRI) at Menlo Park when he presented the demo at a San Francisco computer meetup via video conference. That alone was an impressive technical feat (showing what was essentially the first version of Skype), but what was to come in the next 90 minutes changed things forever.

"If in your office, you as an intellectual worker, were supplied with a computer display backed up by a computer that was alive for you all day and was instantly responsive to every action you have, how much value could you derive from that?" Engelbart asked. "Well, this basically characterizes what we've been pursuing for many years in what we call augmented human intellect research center at the Stanford Research Institute."


https://www.engadget.com/2018/12/10/mot ... niversary/




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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#33

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Dec 10, 2018 4:09 pm

The Onion has of course its very own special reporting....
The Computer Mouse Turns 50
Wednesday 10:25am

On Dec. 9, 1968, engineer Douglas Engelbart introduced the computer mouse at a product demo, bringing one of the essential elements of the personal computer to the public. The Onion looks back at the development of the computer mouse on its 50-year anniversary.

1506:
Leonardo da Vinci sketches rudimentary plans for a trackball.



https://www.theonion.com/the-computer-m ... 1830880010



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tek
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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#34

Post by tek » Mon Dec 10, 2018 5:39 pm

A few years back ms.tek and I attended an excellent evening program at the Computer History Museum about Englebart's work at PARC.
Off Topic
daughter.tek actually met Englebart, when she was 10 years old.. I was attending a conference (SIGCHI), and they had a "kids" program that I enrolled my daughter in.. Englebart was giving a paper at the conference, and he spent a day working with the kids.. She also met and got to work with Brenda Laurel, the founder of Purple Moon (a company making computer games for young girls).. to her this was like meeting a rock star .. so she was walking on a cloud the entire trip ;)


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