Information privacy issue.

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Chilidog
Posts: 8927
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 11:36 am

Information privacy issue.

#1

Post by Chilidog » Sat Dec 30, 2017 4:46 pm

Let's face it.

We have very little real privacy anymore.

We live in an era when even our grocery shopping habits are tracked.

What then is a reasonable expectation of privacy?

Case in point: I have been doing some research on my family tree lately, trying to gather up as much info as I can while certain sources are still alive.

To that end, I have been looking through the data available on "familysearch.org". This is a website run by the LDS church. The data has all been transcribed from freely available government records (birth certificates, death certificates, census, draft registration, etc.).

1) first issue. It's an LDS operation, ultimately for the purposes of bestowing temple ordinances on non-LDS. Personally, if I believed that chanting magic words over a piece of paper had any real value, I'd be a sov-cit. That doesn't really bother me that much. I think it's rather disrespectful, even if they don't.

2) Here's were it gets a bit dicey. This web site allows you to create your family tree online by creating links between records. You can also add your own data. However, once you do that, you lose control over the data, especially if you are entering in personal recollections.

3) THe Family Search website has distinct privacy policies for information related to people who are still living. For example, let's say I have two uncles, Stan and Oliver. Stan is deceased, but Oliver is still alive. It I create two entries in the tree, one for Stan, and one for Oliver, only I will be able to see the entry for Oliver. Anyone can see the data for Stan.

Here is my particular issue. As I went through the data available on the website, I found that someone had already linked up a lot of the records and family relationships. Great. However, there was one problem. This person, let's give her the initials "CB" listed everyone as "deceased" in order to make the revords public.

It took me a bit to figure out who she was, (related to a cousin that I have not seen or communicated with in 40 years, although my sister gets x-mas cards from him.)

I get the impression that she thinks of Family Search as a social media site, which it definitely is not. I also noted that she, apparently, listed herself and her kids as still living as I can not see them in the database she created.

This bothers me.

I am trying to decide if it is worth it to try and get her to change the info (since she created the entries, only she can change them). There is an acceptable work around using third party, stand alone software for her to download and share the data and still maintain some semblance of privacy ( at least I think that it does).

At that point I would be willing to work with her to correct the numerous data errors. I have no issue sharing info with her as long as she respects the privacy of others.

Sigh. Why do people have to make things so difficult?



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RTH10260
Posts: 17710
Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2010 8:52 am
Location: Near the Swiss Alps

Re: Information privacy issue.

#2

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Mar 09, 2018 3:48 pm

remainder of the article at the link as I am unsure of how interesting this is.
Are there paid FBI informants in your IT department like Geek Squad?
New documents show that some employees of Best Buy's Geek Squad repair staff were paid by the FBI to find and report illegal content.

By Conner Forrest | March 8, 2018, 8:45 AM PST


https://www.techrepublic.com/article/ar ... eek-squad/



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DejaMoo
Posts: 4070
Joined: Tue Jan 25, 2011 1:19 pm
Occupation: Agent of ZOG

Re: Information privacy issue.

#3

Post by DejaMoo » Fri Mar 09, 2018 7:50 pm

Chilidog wrote:
Sat Dec 30, 2017 4:46 pm
Case in point: I have been doing some research on my family tree lately, trying to gather up as much info as I can while certain sources are still alive.

To that end, I have been looking through the data available on "familysearch.org". This is a website run by the LDS church. The data has all been transcribed from freely available government records (birth certificates, death certificates, census, draft registration, etc.).

2) Here's were it gets a bit dicey. This web site allows you to create your family tree online by creating links between records. You can also add your own data. However, once you do that, you lose control over the data, especially if you are entering in personal recollections.

Same as most every other website where you may share personal information.
3) THe Family Search website has distinct privacy policies for information related to people who are still living. For example, let's say I have two uncles, Stan and Oliver. Stan is deceased, but Oliver is still alive. It I create two entries in the tree, one for Stan, and one for Oliver, only I will be able to see the entry for Oliver. Anyone can see the data for Stan.

Here is my particular issue. As I went through the data available on the website, I found that someone had already linked up a lot of the records and family relationships. Great. However, there was one problem. This person, let's give her the initials "CB" listed everyone as "deceased" in order to make the revords public.
Contact familysearch.org and report it. Per their privacy policy:
When we become aware of content that we consider to be offensive or that could compromise the privacy of your personal or confidential information or that of another person, we will make a good-faith effort to block or remove such content.


Provide them the details. They'll be easily able to confirm those persons are still alive, using their databases.
I am trying to decide if it is worth it to try and get her to change the info (since she created the entries, only she can change them). There is an acceptable work around using third party, stand alone software for her to download and share the data and still maintain some semblance of privacy ( at least I think that it does).

At that point I would be willing to work with her to correct the numerous data errors. I have no issue sharing info with her as long as she respects the privacy of others.
Good luck with that. My younger sister is doing our family history, and she's been at it for enough years to be reasonably skilled in it. Her most frequent complaint is finding supposed links to our tree, then discovering all over again that the person who created the tree didn't actually do any research, hence the tree is rife with erroneous entries. She contacts these people, explains the errors, goes into detail how she knows the information is wrong, and offers to work with them to find the correct information.

She has never, not once, had anyone take her up on her offer. And no, they don't correct their trees, either.
Sigh. Why do people have to make things so difficult?
Because they have the attention span of a mayfly and the diligence of a kindergartner. They create the trees as a lark, mess with them for awhile, then lose interest and abandon them, leaving the erroneous info out there forever.

GIGO (garbage in, garbage out) still prevails. But that's a good thing, because it works to the advantage of protecting privacy. Everybody knows the saying about Big Brother. Well, Cory Doctorow's got a saying about Little Brother: Little Brother's purpose in life is to mess with Big Brother. One of the easiest ways to do that is to provide false information about yourself. I do it all the time. It's quite entertaining to see where it ends up. And anybody who finds online information about me will find some accurate data mixed in with great steaming piles of bulldata.



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RTH10260
Posts: 17710
Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2010 8:52 am
Location: Near the Swiss Alps

Re: Information privacy issue.

#4

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Jun 25, 2018 6:07 am

for Facebookers a mandatory reading
'I downloaded all my Facebook data and it was a nightmare'
Ever wondered what your data actually looks like?

Radhika Sanghani
21 June 2018

To tell you the truth, I have never been the kind of person to worry too much about my personal data online. I know it’s concerning, but trying to do anything about it just feels pointless. Where are we even supposed to start?

I'm 28, and I’ve spent most of my life online. I got a Hotmail account at 10, my first phone at 11, and a Facebook account at 16. I must have given so much personal information away (let alone all the embarrassing drunk photos I posted online while at uni) that it’s easier to live in denial and not think about it.

But when the news came out that Facebook had passed on data of up to 87 million of its members to political consultancy Cambridge Analytica without their knowledge - and one in 20 Brits were reported to delete their accounts - I started to wonder just how much information the social network had on me.

For the first time in my online life, I decided to face up to my data and download everything Facebook had on me.

In recent months, the site has made this easy. All you have to do is go to 'settings' and then 'access your information'. It turns out that in the 12 years I’ve been on Facebook, I’ve collected 324MB worth of data. This didn’t mean much to me until it took 40 minutes to download (35 minutes more than it took me to download a two hour film recently). Facebook knows far more about me than I’d ever realised.


https://www.bbc.co.uk/bbcthree/article/ ... 46cd48c12c



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