Cyber Security

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Tiredretiredlawyer
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Re: Cyber Security

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Mon Jul 10, 2017 1:21 pm

RTH10260 wrote:
Addie wrote:TIME

Trump Backtracks on His Idea for a Joint Cyber Security Unit With Russia after Harsh Criticism
:snippity:
The idea appeared to be a political non-starter. It was immediately scorned by several of Trump's fellow Republicans, who questioned why the United States would work with Russia after Moscow's alleged meddling in the 2016 U.S. election.
And why would the US want to cooperate with Russia when Russia is clearly derailing the US efforts in Syria... :brickwallsmall:
Because the trump was honored to meet Putin at the G19.
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Re: Cyber Security

Post by RVInit » Mon Jul 10, 2017 1:48 pm

Yeah, but there is still the issue of the possibility of Trump being able to meet with Putin without a career State Department or career (meaning non-political appointee) intelligence officer present. I don't trust Trump or any of his appointees to meet with Putin.

We really don't know what went on in that meeting he and Tillerson had with Putin. Tillerson was very careful how he worded his statement (which is why HE is the one who gave the statement) and I believe he deliberately worded his statement in such a way as to give the impression that Trump gave any meaningful objection to Russian interference in our election and also worded not to alarm us about what really went on in that meeting. I'm sure if we knew exactly what the four of them talked about we would indeed be alarmed. IMO.

Yeah, Trump said that the "American people" were concerned about Russian interference - meaning Trump himself was not concerned about it.
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Re: Cyber Security

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Sep 03, 2017 5:08 pm

711 million email addresses ensnared in 'largest' spambot
The spambot has collected millions of email credentials and server login information in order to send spam through "legitimate" servers, defeating many spam filters.

By Zack Whittaker for Zero Day | August 29, 2017 -- 19:30 GMT (20:30 BST) | Topic: Security

A huge spambot ensnaring 711 million email accounts has been uncovered.

A Paris-based security researcher, who goes by the pseudonymous handle Benkow, discovered an open and accessible web server hosted in the Netherlands, which stores dozens of text files containing a huge batch of email addresses, passwords, and email servers used to send spam.

Those credentials are crucial for the spammer's large-scale malware operation to bypass spam filters by sending email through legitimate email servers.

The spambot, dubbed "Onliner," is used to deliver the Ursnif banking malware into inboxes all over the world. To date, it's resulted in more than 100,000 unique infections across the world, Benkow told ZDNet.

Troy Hunt, who runs breach notification site Have I Been Pwned, said it was a "mind-boggling amount of data."
http://www.zdnet.com/article/onliner-sp ... -millions/
Members of the public can check if their accounts have been affected via the" Have I Been Pwned" service.
http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-41095606

This is the website you can check your email (or a domain name):
https://haveibeenpwned.com/



More background info can be found here:
https://www.forbes.com/sites/leemathews ... 47a2f72aa9



Note by this poster: One of my anonymous web aliasses shows up. May have been from a prior Yahoo breach. But need to change p/w :cry:

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Re: Cyber Security

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Sep 08, 2017 11:07 am

Due to the nature of this security breach, picked most pertinent info even above the 4 para limit
Equifax Says Cyberattack May Have Affected 143 Million Customers

By TARA SIEGEL BERNARD, TIFFANY HSU, NICOLE PERLROTH and RON LIEBERSEPT. 7, 2017

Equifax, one of the three major consumer credit reporting agencies, said on Thursday that hackers had gained access to company data that potentially compromised sensitive information for 143 million American consumers, including Social Security numbers and driver’s license numbers.

The attack on the company represents one of the largest risks to personally sensitive information in recent years, and is the third major cybersecurity threat for the agency since 2015.

Equifax, based in Atlanta, is a particularly tempting target for hackers. If identity thieves wanted to hit one place to grab all the data needed to do the most damage, they would go straight to one of the three major credit reporting agencies.

“This is about as bad as it gets,” said Pamela Dixon, executive director of the World Privacy Forum, a nonprofit research group. “If you have a credit report, chances are you may be in this breach. The chances are much better than 50 percent.”

Criminals gained access to certain files in the company’s system from mid-May to July by exploiting a weak point in website software, according to an investigation by Equifax and security consultants. The company said that it discovered the intrusion on July 29 and has since found no evidence of unauthorized activity on its main consumer or commercial credit reporting databases.

In addition to the other material, hackers were also able to retrieve names, birth dates and addresses. Credit card numbers for 209,000 consumers were stolen, while documents with personal information used in disputes for 182,000 people were also taken.
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/07/busi ... ttack.html

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Re: Cyber Security

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Sep 08, 2017 11:10 am

and possible some insider trading...
Equifax execs sold stock before hack was disclosed
by Paul R. La Monica September 8, 2017: 9:31 AM ET

Three Equifax executives sold shares of the credit-reporting company worth nearly $2 million shortly after a massive data breach was discovered. The sales occurred before the company announced the breach to the public on Thursday.

Equifax said in a statement to CNNMoney that it found out about the security incident on July 29 and immediately took action.

But according to filings with the SEC, Equifax Chief Financial Officer John Gamble sold shares worth nearly $950,000 on August 1.

Joseph Loughran, Equifax's president for U.S. information solutions, sold shares worth about $685,000 on August 1 as well.

And Rodolfo Ploder, president of workforce solutions, sold stock for just more than $250,000 on August 2.
http://money.cnn.com/2017/09/08/investi ... index.html

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MRich
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Re: Cyber Security

Post by MRich » Fri Sep 08, 2017 12:44 pm

Can anyone tell me how this can happen? Honestly, the executives of this company should be criminally charged.

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Re: Cyber Security

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Fri Sep 08, 2017 12:54 pm

MRich wrote:Can anyone tell me how this can happen? Honestly, the executives of this company should be criminally charged.
If they make security breeches criminal (for anything other than actual criminal conduct) for a company that's hacked we'd have to say goodbye to a shit ton of electronic transactions. It's already criminal to hack, but I can't see where making the victims of the hack responsible will do much of anything.

But they need to hang the insider trading scum out to dry. I'd be ok with that.

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Re: Cyber Security

Post by tek » Fri Sep 08, 2017 12:57 pm

Not ready to jump yet; correlation is not causation.

Often execs have preplanned sell orders (for just this reason).. it is entirely possible these were just ordered set to fire on August 1.

But the SEC could get to the bottom of that quickly, if they cared to.
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Re: Cyber Security

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Sep 08, 2017 5:19 pm

tek wrote:Not ready to jump yet; correlation is not causation.

Often execs have preplanned sell orders (for just this reason).. it is entirely possible these were just ordered set to fire on August 1.

But the SEC could get to the bottom of that quickly, if they cared to.
PS. the article mentioned a spokesperson for the company saying that the shares sold were only a small part of what the guys were holding.

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Re: Cyber Security

Post by Notorial Dissent » Sat Sep 09, 2017 9:54 am

It is entirely possible the share sale was coincidence, it is also possible that the data breach wasn't as bad as first reported. I don't believe that either. I think I see some REALLY nasty and expensive lawsuits coming. I do NOT see good things for their stock or financial stability.
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Re: Cyber Security

Post by Lani » Sat Sep 09, 2017 7:37 pm

Editor's note, September 8: We recommend that anyone with a credit history assume they were affected by the hack, as Equifax's hack-checker tool proved unreliable in our tests.

:snippity:

How can I find out if I was affected?

Equifax has set up its own program to help people find out if they were one of the millions affected in the hack. It includes a tool that lets you check to see if you were affected and a program, Trusted ID, that may help prevent identity theft. But, be aware: the checker that lets you know if you were hacked might be broken and -- per the above note -- enrolling in the program might prevent you from participating in a class-action lawsuit against the company.

Because of these circumstances, we recommend that, for now, anyone with a credit history should assume they were affected by the hack.
https://www.cnet.com/how-to/equifax-dat ... on-hacked/
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Re: Cyber Security

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Sun Sep 10, 2017 1:24 pm

https://medium.com/new-york-state-attor ... a5d8c231b7
How To Protect Yourself From The Equifax Hack

P.S. — some of you may have seen reports about the terms of use for Equifax’s website to check whether your personal information is at risk. We called yesterday. After conversations with my office, Equifax publicly stated that consumers who check their status will not waive their rights. We are continuing to closely review.
Cybersecurity Incident & Important Consumer Information
September 8, 2017

We understand that some consumers are experiencing difficulties getting the answers and support they need through our website and call center. Ramping up the website and call center to handle the anticipated volume is ongoing and we are focused on making improvements as quickly as possible. We apologize for any inconvenience this process has created.

Thus far today, we’ve made the following adjustments:

1). YOU CAN DETERMINE YOUR STATUS IMMEDIATELY
Some consumers who visited the website soon after its launch failed to receive confirmation clarifying whether or not they were potentially impacted. That issue is now resolved, and we encourage those consumers to revisit the site to receive a response that clarifies their status.

2). NO WAIVER OF RIGHTS FOR THIS CYBER SECURITY INCIDENT
In response to consumer inquiries, we have made it clear that the arbitration clause and class action waiver included in the Equifax and TrustedID Premier terms of use does not apply to this cybersecurity incident.

3). EXPANDED OUR CALL CENTER
We have tripled our call center team to over 2000 agents and continue to add agents.
:snippity:
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Re: Cyber Security

Post by ZekeB » Wed Sep 13, 2017 6:03 pm

The Feds are going to ditch Kaspersky as their AV utility. I always wondered why they used Russian stuff when the good old U S of A stuff is as good or better than Kaspersky. Chalk one up for Trump. OTOH Trump probably hasn't a clue about this.
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Re: Cyber Security

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Sep 22, 2017 12:33 pm

Android malware bypassed Google Play store security, could have infected 4.2 million devices
A new Android malware variant known as ExpensiveWall uses SMS messages to charge victims for fraudulent services without their knowledge or consent.

By Conner Forrest | September 18, 2017, 10:54 AM PST

A new form of Android malware was able to slip past the anti-malware protections in Google Play and could have infected up to 4.2 million devices, according to a report from Check Point security researchers. According to the report, ExpensiveWall infected at least 50 apps and could have been downloaded 1-4.2 million times.

So, what does this malware do? The report said that it "sends fraudulent premium SMS messages and charges users' accounts for fake services without their knowledge." It also uses an obfuscation technique that allows it to encrypt the malicious code and sneak past certain malware protections.

After finding some samples of this malware, the researchers notified Google on August 7, leading to Google removing the apps from the Google Play store. Although, even after their removal, the report said, another sample showed up later leading to more infections.
http://www.techrepublic.com/article/and ... 2-devices/

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Re: Cyber Security

Post by GhostOfSolomon » Fri Sep 29, 2017 3:51 pm

Bloomberg- The Equifax Hack Has the Hallmarks of State-Sponsored Pros
Before long, hackers had penetrated Equifax. They may not have immediately grasped the value of their discovery, but, as the attack escalated over the following months, that first group—known as an entry crew—handed off to a more sophisticated team of hackers. They homed in on a bounty of staggering scale: the financial data—Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses and more—of at least 143 million Americans. By the time they were done, the attackers had accessed dozens of sensitive databases and created more than 30 separate entry points into Equifax's computer systems. The hackers were finally discovered on July 29, but were so deeply embedded that the company was forced to take a consumer complaint portal offline for 11 days while the security team found and closed the backdoors the intruders had set up.
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Re: Cyber Security

Post by tek » Fri Sep 29, 2017 5:32 pm

cybersecurity is a fundamentally hard problem, but we (meaning my peers in the software/systems world) are perfectly happy to follow the herd and do whatever is considered good enough "today" (where "today" is at release, which might be a year ago)

I *refuse* to sign off on anything security related at any of my clients - because I know I'm not smart enough. If that means we part ways, fine.

At a higher level, we need to assume everything will be compromised. Taken at face value, that seems to say all is lost. But that's not true; we just haven't looked hard enough to understand what "everything will be compromised" means.

just MHO..
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Re: Cyber Security

Post by RTH10260 » Sat Sep 30, 2017 6:59 pm

Apache Struts Statement on Equifax Security Breach

UPDATE: MEDIA ALERT: The Apache Software Foundation Confirms Equifax Data Breach Due to Failure to Install Patches Provided for Apache® Struts™ Exploit

The Apache Struts Project Management Committee (PMC) would like to comment on the Equifax security breach, its relation to the Apache Struts Web Framework and associated media coverage.

We are sorry to hear news that Equifax suffered from a security breach and information disclosure incident that was potentially carried out by exploiting a vulnerability in the Apache Struts Web Framework. At this point in time it is not clear which Struts vulnerability would have been utilized, if any. In an online article published on Quartz.com [1], the assumption was made that the breach could be related to CVE-2017-9805, which was publicly announced on 2017-09-04 [2] along with new Struts Framework software releases to patch this and other vulnerabilities [3][4]. However, the security breach was already detected in July [5], which means that the attackers either used an earlier announced vulnerability on an unpatched Equifax server or exploited a vulnerability not known at this point in time --a so-called Zero-Day-Exploit. If the breach was caused by exploiting CVE-2017-9805, it would have been a Zero-Day-Exploit by that time. The article also states that the CVE-2017-9805 vulnerability exists for nine years now.

We as the Apache Struts PMC want to make clear that the development team puts enormous efforts in securing and hardening the software we produce, and fixing problems whenever they come to our attention. In alignment with the Apache security policies, once we get notified of a possible security issue, we privately work with the reporting entity to reproduce and fix the problem and roll out a new release hardened against the found vulnerability. We then publicly announce the problem description and how to fix it. Even if exploit code is known to us, we try to hold back this information for several weeks to give Struts Framework users as much time as possible to patch their software products before exploits will pop up in the wild. However, since vulnerability detection and exploitation has become a professional business, it is and always will be likely that attacks will occur even before we fully disclose the attack vectors, by reverse engineering the code that fixes the vulnerability in question or by scanning for yet unknown vulnerabilities.

Regarding the assertion that especially CVE-2017-9805 is a nine year old security flaw, one has to understand that there is a huge difference between detecting a flaw after nine years and knowing about a flaw for several years. If the latter was the case, the team would have had a hard time to provide a good answer why they did not fix this earlier. But this was actually not the case here --we were notified just recently on how a certain piece of code can be misused, and we fixed this ASAP. What we saw here is common software engineering business --people write code for achieving a desired function, but may not be aware of undesired side-effects. Once this awareness is reached, we as well as hopefully all other library and framework maintainers put high efforts into removing the side-effects as soon as possible. It's probably fair to say that we met this goal pretty well in case of CVE-2017-9805.
https://blogs.apache.org/foundation/ent ... on-equifax

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Re: Cyber Security

Post by GhostOfSolomon » Sat Sep 30, 2017 7:13 pm

tek wrote:
Fri Sep 29, 2017 5:32 pm
cybersecurity is a fundamentally hard problem, but we (meaning my peers in the software/systems world) are perfectly happy to follow the herd and do whatever is considered good enough "today" (where "today" is at release, which might be a year ago)

I *refuse* to sign off on anything security related at any of my clients - because I know I'm not smart enough. If that means we part ways, fine.

At a higher level, we need to assume everything will be compromised. Taken at face value, that seems to say all is lost. But that's not true; we just haven't looked hard enough to understand what "everything will be compromised" means.

just MHO..
Tek, I agree with you. At this point in time it is safe to assume everyone has been compromised in one way or another. We need to find a solution and secure the future generations.

Their data hasn't been stolen yet.
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Re: Cyber Security

Post by RTH10260 » Sat Sep 30, 2017 7:15 pm

GhostOfSolomon wrote:
Fri Sep 29, 2017 3:51 pm
Bloomberg- The Equifax Hack Has the Hallmarks of State-Sponsored Pros
Before long, hackers had penetrated Equifax. They may not have immediately grasped the value of their discovery, but, as the attack escalated over the following months, that first group—known as an entry crew—handed off to a more sophisticated team of hackers. They homed in on a bounty of staggering scale: the financial data—Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses and more—of at least 143 million Americans. By the time they were done, the attackers had accessed dozens of sensitive databases and created more than 30 separate entry points into Equifax's computer systems. The hackers were finally discovered on July 29, but were so deeply embedded that the company was forced to take a consumer complaint portal offline for 11 days while the security team found and closed the backdoors the intruders had set up.
A huge headache for the secret services communities over the next 50+ years. Deep datamining will show government employees that may be good targets for blackmail. Correlate with openly available data on court cases and many may be available to cooperate if their darker side remains hidden. A nice background to create "legends" for spies to live in the US. Take over an identity and make the real guy disappear, and the only possibility to discover the replacement may be a DNA test. Possibly even background data to uncover US spies working as expats elsewhere. Teh Donald will need very bigly extreme vetting to detect a visitor with bad credentials. Visa applications will now need to be matched to a copy of the data of the Equinox breach. Will all people with a stolen Equinox record be required to submit a biometric tag like used for passports to detect possible mismatches at visa application and attempted entry to the US?

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Re: Cyber Security

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Oct 04, 2017 11:00 am

It turns out every Yahoo account was hit by the data breach a few years ago
Instead of one billion, it was actually 'all three billion,' the company says.
WILLIAM WILCOXEN 14 HOURS AGO

A 2013 security breach at Yahoo affected three times as many accounts as the company first thought, a new announcement says.

Yahoo was acquired this summer by Verizon, which said Tuesday the data theft affected not just one billion accounts, as Yahoo reported last year, but "all three billion accounts."

Verizon had investigators look back at the data breach as part of its integration with Yahoo.

They say the hackers did not steal any bank account or payment card numbers. What they did steal were names, email addresses, telephone numbers, birth dates, hashed passwords, and security questions.

Last year Yahoo made the one billion account holders they knew were affected change their passwords and their security questions.

Now they'll send emails to another two billion people advising them to do that, too.
https://www.gomn.com/news/it-turns-out- ... -years-ago

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MsDaisy
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Re: Cyber Security

Post by MsDaisy » Tue Oct 17, 2017 6:31 am

Hackers have turned Politifact’s website into a trap for your PC
PolitiFact has been an invaluable resource for debunking politicians' misstatements and falsehoods. But now, it seems, some unknown actor is trying to profit off the website's popularity — by hooking visitors' computers into a virtual currency mining operation.

The hack was discovered Friday by security researcher Troy Mursch, who noticed that visiting Politifact.com caused his computer's CPU to run at its maximum capacity.

The anomaly left telltale signs of Coin Hive — a piece of code that can be installed on websites that, when active, diverts unused computational power on visitors' computers toward generating a Bitcoin-like currency called Monero. Under ordinary circumstances, said Mursch, Coin Hive is used by some websites as an alternative to advertising. But in the case of PolitiFact, somebody has programmed the site to run multiple versions of Coin Hive simultaneously, basically bringing any visitor's computer to a processing halt.

The phenomenon was soon confirmed by security journalist Brian Krebs.

The issue may be related to a third-party ad provider, said Aaron Sharockman, executive director of PolitiFact, which is owned by the Tampa Bay Times.

“It's frustrating,” he said. “I'm escalating now with our ad and IT folks and I'll get back to you.”
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the ... def552a477
Birfers are toast

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RTH10260
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Re: Cyber Security

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Oct 17, 2017 6:46 am

MsDaisy wrote:
Tue Oct 17, 2017 6:31 am
Hackers have turned Politifact’s website into a trap for your PC

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the ... def552a477
about Coinhive from their website:
Coinhive offers a JavaScript miner for the Monero Blockchain (Why Monero?) that you can embed in your website. Your users run the miner directly in their Browser and mine XMR for you in turn for an ad-free experience, in-game currency or whatever incentives you can come up with.

grant video streaming time
offer files for download
allow ad-free browsing on your site
credit in-game money or items in your game
Our JavaScript API gives you the flexibilty to offer any rewards and incentives you like.

We also offer a captcha-like service as well as a shortlink solution that is easy to implement on your site. These services, while fully supported, should only serve as an example of what's possible.

We are excited to see how you will use our service. We dream about it as an alternative to micro payments, artificial wait time in online games, intrusive ads and dubious marketing tactics.

Your users can “pay” you with full privacy, without registering an account anywhere, without installing a browser extension and without being bombarded by shady ads. They will pay you with just their CPU power.
https://coinhive.com

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RTH10260
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Re: Cyber Security

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Oct 17, 2017 6:56 am

Also, too.

HowTo remove Coinhive from your browser


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MsDaisy
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Re: Cyber Security

Post by MsDaisy » Tue Oct 17, 2017 7:02 am

Does this Coinhive thing affect Mac as well as PCs? :confused:
Birfers are toast

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pipistrelle
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Re: Cyber Security

Post by pipistrelle » Tue Oct 17, 2017 7:20 am

dubious marketing tactics
This sounds like one.

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