Windows 10

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Re: Windows 10

Post #426 by Flatpointhigh » Mon May 15, 2017 11:52 am

Reality Check wrote:
Fortinbras wrote:For those who were wary of Windows10, and stuck to XP, the recent European siege of ransomware seems to have been tailored to the fact that most beaureaucratic computers were still running Windows XP.

https://www.wired.com/2017/05/still-use-windows-xp-prepare-worst/


I am not surprised that government organizations would be the ones running an OS that is three releases behind and hasn't been supported with security patches since 2014. That is very irresponsible and just asking for trouble.

They have no choice - most of the programs used were never updated to run on the newer versions.



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Re: Windows 10

Post #427 by ZekeB » Mon May 15, 2017 3:55 pm

Flatpointhigh wrote:They have no choice - most of the programs used were never updated to run on the newer versions.

The IT department of my old government employer thought they could write programs better and cheaper. Better? I never saw one they wrote for us that was completely debugged. Every last one was never fully completed and was barely able to do what we told the programmers we needed. Cheaper? Not even close to the cost the commercially available stuff. They were charging us $100 an hour to reinvent the wheel. They'd write a program that would run on XP, for example, but the programs were never Microsoft Windows compliant. Many programs used the browser as the interface. When Microsoft upgraded Internet Explorer the programs wouldn't run. We were stuck with an obsolete operating system and web browser. Of course our in-house people thought they could keep the viruses out. They did, to a point. Anytime someone told us they would attach instructions to an e-mail we had to tell them to rename the file extension as txt or our mail server would trash the entire e-mail. This is why you see large companies and government institutions stuck with obsolete operating systems. They write their own half-assed programs and need to keep the old junk.



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Re: Windows 10

Post #428 by Shizzle Popped » Mon May 15, 2017 6:51 pm

I worked for 20 years for a fortune 100 insurance company, the last several as an IT Architect. We're always a generation or two behind on Windows because compatibility testing and program patching takes forever in a large organization with a wide variety of software implementations. This problem extends to purchased software as well as custom code.

Our philosophy is to purchase what we can but many commercially available programs simply can't scale to the size of our organization. This is a common problem for large companies and governmental organizations. However, the software for our core business will always be custom. I was involved in the first complete rewrite of our claims system in decades. It took years and cost a billion dollars. It wasn't perfect and there were requirements that we couldn't meet out of the gate because they either weren't technically feasible or were deemed not worth the investment at the time. On the other hand, it automated a number of processes that used to be manual. Many claims are completely processed 15 minutes after they were entered into the system. It was a huge investment in money and manpower and was a drain on the IT department's resources for years. On the other hand, the ROI worked out to 18 months, so I'll guess it was probably worth doing.

I've been in IT for 37 years and I've never seen a fully debugged system and I never will. It was hard enough when the programs were standalone COBOL programs on a mainframe and were tens of thousands of lines of code. Now our systems have to integrate with several other systems and our customers (including me) expect access to all of it from their computers and mobile devices. These systems are vastly more complex than they were just a decade ago and are many millions of lines of code. No matter what the textbooks say, it's simply not feasible to completely test all the possible permutations of interactions that a bug can crop up in. And it's not getting any easier.

Everything we write today for anything larger than a small workgroup is written with a browser based interface. There's actually a very good reason for this. Implementing code changes across a platform of 10K, 20K or 100K computers is a service and support nightmare. It can take weeks to roll out a simple code change for an application that physically resides on user workstations. If I use a browser interface, the program code is all stored on the servers. Program changes can be implemented overnight or over a weekend and everybody gets the change at the same time. It's a far more efficient way to distribute a program in a large organization.

As far as the Windows version debate goes, I've supported and/or used every version of windows from the very beginning, along with a few versions of UNIX and OS/2 back in the day. I have 10 computers in the house running Windows 10 right now and I think it's the most stable of all the Windows versions I've worked with to date. It's only on a very rare occasion that I have to restart one of these computers for anything other than a software update. Under Windows 7 I had my servers on a weekly restart schedule and even then I had to manually bounce them every once in a while. I've got a pair of servers running Windows 10 that I haven't done anything with since at least Christmas and they're running fine. There are things I don't like about Windows 10 but, overall, I'd much rather run it than any previous version.


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Re: Windows 10

Post #429 by MN-Skeptic » Mon May 15, 2017 7:14 pm

:yeah:



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Re: Windows 10

Post #430 by RTH10260 » Mon May 15, 2017 7:50 pm

ZekeB wrote:
Flatpointhigh wrote:They have no choice - most of the programs used were never updated to run on the newer versions.

The IT department of my old government employer thought they could write programs better and cheaper. Better? I never saw one they wrote for us that was completely debugged. Every last one was never fully completed and was barely able to do what we told the programmers we needed. Cheaper? Not even close to the cost the commercially available stuff. They were charging us $100 an hour to reinvent the wheel. They'd write a program that would run on XP, for example, but the programs were never Microsoft Windows compliant. Many programs used the browser as the interface. When Microsoft upgraded Internet Explorer the programs wouldn't run. We were stuck with an obsolete operating system and web browser. Of course our in-house people thought they could keep the viruses out. They did, to a point. Anytime someone told us they would attach instructions to an e-mail we had to tell them to rename the file extension as txt or our mail server would trash the entire e-mail. This is why you see large companies and government institutions stuck with obsolete operating systems. They write their own half-assed programs and need to keep the old junk.

There is also the human resources aspect. More than once I had seen top developers leaving cause HR only offered a very limited remuneration and incentives (if any). The paycheck limit generally limited also to the level of quality of staffers that joined. And HR and IT would fear dropping underperforming staff cause new staff was hardly to be found. I did see IT departments urging a good developer to drop out of the company and join one of the software supplier companies, or go full freelance, and then contracted back at the higher price, no questions asked. Ongoing education was generally lacking or allocated to the wrong people, like by seniority, with no further inhouse knowlege transfer. And then the sole developers in the know became kings, and no one ever bothered to see knowlede duplicated, exept a couple of months prior to retirement of the king. The sucessor would inevitably be a new guy off the street, as other kings were fully loaded with keeping their ancient stuff up and running. The new guy would not have time to understand what's going on. And out of frustration several threw the handtowel during probation period, leaving an empty field.



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Re: Windows 10

Post #431 by Flatpointhigh » Mon May 15, 2017 10:10 pm

The programs that my social worker uses is XP only. they can't upgrade, and these are commercial programs.



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Re: Windows 10

Post #432 by Plutodog » Mon May 15, 2017 11:00 pm

Even with Win 10, using Firefox it will freeze at times, usually requiring a restart unless I want to wait a looong time. I keep multiple tabs open.


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Re: Windows 10

Post #433 by mmmirele » Mon May 15, 2017 11:23 pm

My ex-boyfriend bought a Dell box with Windows XP a decade ago. Actually, I picked out the box and he bought it, because even though he is a programmer, he might as well be computer illiterate and a semi-Luddite. One of his "quirks" was that he wouldn't let Windows XP update, so his computer was basically unprotected except for the AVG anti-virus he had on there. And yes, I told him over and over and over again to let his box update.

Fast forward to last Friday morning, when the global hacking attack occurred. I called up the ex-boyfriend and told him he needed to get his box off the Internet. Yes, that might have been drastic, but I didn't want him accidentally downloading anything. Remember, he hasn't updated his box in I don't know how long. He actually put the box back online and tried to update it, but Internet Explorer 8 kept spewing runtime errors when trying to connect to Microsoft Update. I'm on vacation this week from work, so I said I'd come over this morning and look at it. After an hour and a half, I conceded defeat. For some reason, even after resetting IE 8 back to factory, I couldn't get ANY Microsoft website to load (everything else loaded great, except for the standard notices that Win 8 had been deprecated). So much for trying to update anything. I told him he needed a new computer.

I had actually sussed out possible candidates for My Next Box when I was shopping for a computer late last year. I waffled between a laptop and a desktop and going to Windows 10 and using a flavor of Linux. I finally settled on a specially built box from Puget Systems in Washington state, which had built my last box. It is a Windows 10 desktop with two hard drives (one SSD and the other a 2TB regular HD) and 32 GB of RAM. The most important thing about it is that it's built to be extremely quiet. Computer fans are extremely distracting to me.

Well, my boyfriend wanted a laptop, and he wanted Not Windows. This pretty much meant that he was going to get a Dell XPS 13 with Ubuntu 16.04 on it. I had specced it out last year and had seriously thought about buying it, but went with a desktop because I could use my mondo monitor with it without too much hassle, I could use a regular keyboard and so on. (Yes, you can hook all that stuff up to a laptop; I do that with my work laptop.) So he handed me his credit card and told me to go ahead and buy it. Which I did.

Remember what I said about semi-Luddite? He also pays for pretty much everything by cash or check. So his credit card got declined because, well, when the only thing you put on it is tanks of gas, and then you spend a lot more money on a computer, well, it gets flagged as fraud. So he had to call his card issuer, then call Dell and get that straightened out.

So he'll probably get this next week and I will be writing up a set of instructions for him to use with his laptop on how to regularly update it. We are not going through this again.



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Re: Windows 10

Post #434 by Addie » Thu May 18, 2017 1:25 pm

Sorry if this is the wrong thread, but thought you might want to know this.

The Register UK

Chrome (browser) on Windows has credential theft bug

Google's Chrome team is working to fix a credential theft bug that strikes if the browser is running on Microsoft Windows.

The bug is exploited if a user is tricked into clicking a link that downloads a Windows .scf file (the ancient Shell Command File format, a shortcut to Show Desktop since Windows 98). ...

While users wait for a fix from Google, Chrome users should get to their Advanced settings, and make Chrome ask where downloaded files are to be saved: that way, the .scf extension will be revealed.

Google told Kaspersky's ThreatPost it's aware of the issue and is working on a fix.


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Re: Windows 10

Post #435 by MN-Skeptic » Sun May 28, 2017 3:16 pm

My Windows 8.1 laptop has hardware issues so I just ordered a Dell XPS 15 with Windows 10.

:?

For those who have been using Windows 10 - what should I do when I get my new laptop? What default settings should I change? What can I do to avoid issues? What should I worry about that I didn't in Windows 8.1?



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Re: Windows 10

Post #436 by Estiveo » Sun May 28, 2017 3:29 pm

First, you'll want to turn off Cortana.


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Re: Windows 10

Post #437 by Reality Check » Sun May 28, 2017 3:40 pm

I have a several year old laptop that I just upgraded to Windows 10 Creator Edition. I followed a lot of the recommendations on this video and I found it booted a lot quicker. I didn't download any of the tools to do it. I just followed a lot of the settings recommendations. I would be careful about disabling services. You are probably safe to disable things like the Xbox services. I did that.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KFc6l8jrVs&t=4s


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Re: Windows 10

Post #438 by RTH10260 » Sun May 28, 2017 4:11 pm

Review all privacy settings, with Win10 MS was tricky and enables all stuff to be collected. I guess upthread may be some link to howto.



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Re: Windows 10

Post #439 by ZekeB » Sun May 28, 2017 4:17 pm

Turn off Cortana. Go to the privacy settings and turn off what you don't want them to see, including the one that sends your system errors to MS. You decide if you want location services enabled. Sometimes that comes in handy, but it does let web sites know where you are. Don't use Edge. Plan on the install taking a couple of hours as the update takes longer than the install. If you liked the Windows 7 games, send me a note after the install.

If you don't have a Microsoft Account, get one. Once you register your computer to your account you can re-install Windows on that computer without having to go through the validation again.



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Re: Windows 10

Post #440 by RTH10260 » Thu Jun 22, 2017 9:04 am

Microsoft Defender

Just a note based on a fresh news item:

For Europe at least, maybe worldwide, with the recent Creators edition of Windows10, Microsoft deactivates their own Microsoft Defender anti-virus tool when another third party ant-virus product is installed.

This based on a complaint by Kapersky with the EU Commission against Microsoft, over market power issues.

Ref in German; https://futurezone.at/digital-life/micr ... 71.179.779



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Re: Windows 10

Post #441 by Flatpointhigh » Tue Jun 27, 2017 1:30 pm

Estiveo wrote:First, you'll want to turn off Cortana.

yes. this is especially vital if you will be using your laptop where confidentiality is all.



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