Fogbow woodworkers' club

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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#351

Post by Whatever4 » Wed Dec 20, 2017 4:53 pm

Looks like gingerbread cookies.
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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#352

Post by vic » Wed Dec 20, 2017 5:10 pm

Looks like a lot of work.

But after reading stuff like the Bundy threads, it is always a joy to see something posted in this thread, whether it is a completed (or in-progress) project, or some wood samples with various stains, or a layout like that, or some nice woodworking tools.

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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#353

Post by RoadScholar » Wed Dec 20, 2017 9:53 pm

Those layouts produce a pattern called a “face mould” needed for developing compound curved railing segments like this one:
F4EE173F-EE36-4CFD-AAB3-774ED0ECB3F3.jpeg
DF299726-F73D-4FB2-977C-9BB76844ED4E.jpeg
It takes a ridiculous amount of effort to make railings look like they were effortlessly squeezed out of a tube like toothpaste.
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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#354

Post by kate520 » Wed Dec 20, 2017 11:16 pm

I remember those. ;) It’s truly amazing to see in person.
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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#355

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Thu Dec 21, 2017 4:28 am

The paper patterns are a work of art themselves.

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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#356

Post by jmj » Thu Dec 21, 2017 9:47 am

RoadScholar wrote:
Wed Dec 20, 2017 9:53 pm
Those layouts produce a pattern called a “face mould” needed for developing compound curved railing segments like this one:

F4EE173F-EE36-4CFD-AAB3-774ED0ECB3F3.jpeg

DF299726-F73D-4FB2-977C-9BB76844ED4E.jpeg

It takes a ridiculous amount of effort to make railings look like they were effortlessly squeezed out of a tube like toothpaste.
Nice. Way beyond my skill level. Did you get those out of a single wide board or did you have to glue up some pieces to get around the corner somehow? How will they get joined to the straight runs? So many questions. (and is that an Emmert vise?)
Edit: from what I can see of the grain, I guess it's made of a wide board with the grain going across at 45 deg?

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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#357

Post by RoadScholar » Thu Dec 21, 2017 11:46 am

Yes, the slab can be glued up for width and thickness. We are using KD common-size stock; the antique rails I've seen single-piece must have started with a big slab right from the tree. We can't do that no more, but fortunately we got better glue. 8-)

But it's still a single-grain-direction board. The pieces are not glued up to turn with the curve of the piece.

The old literature calls these "wreaths."

The joints are just made with rail bolts (sometimes called "hanger bolts") with a wood thread on one end and machine threads on the other. The old guys had "star nuts" that could be tightened with a punch. They're tough to find today, but are sometimes available as sets for way too much money (if you need a lot of them). If you just need a few, probably a good deal:

stair-parts-handrails-9400k-312-hd00l-64_1000.jpg

Before glues were perfected, they'd use a bolt low and a dowel high in each joint to prevent the joint from twisting.

This shows a regular up-easing above connected with a rail bolt to a compound turnout at the bottom:

Frock Handrail 1 crp.jpeg
This shot was just after installation; the colors have modulated since and show less of a contrast. We made the rail and newel cap, and a local turner made the newels and balusters. Client built the stairs.

Edit: Yes, an Emmert vise. We're got a few. My personal one is a "turtle-back."
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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#358

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Thu Dec 21, 2017 11:55 am

Beautiful!
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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#359

Post by RoadScholar » Thu Dec 21, 2017 12:01 pm

This shows the basic idea behind stair rail geometry:


Handrailing geometric theory.png
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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#360

Post by Notorial Dissent » Thu Dec 21, 2017 12:22 pm

Beautiful work.
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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#361

Post by tencats » Sun Dec 24, 2017 3:01 am

RoadScholar wrote:
Wed Dec 20, 2017 9:53 pm

It takes a ridiculous amount of effort to make railings look like they were effortlessly squeezed out of a tube like toothpaste.
Fast n easy work for these guys here.


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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#362

Post by RoadScholar » Sun Dec 24, 2017 8:02 am

Gack!
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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#363

Post by Whatever4 » Sun Dec 24, 2017 9:49 am

The amazing thing is that he still seems to have all his fingers. :shock:
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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#364

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Sun Dec 24, 2017 10:04 am

Whatever4 wrote:
Sun Dec 24, 2017 9:49 am
The amazing thing is that he still seems to have all his fingers. :shock:
You should see some of our craftsmen making band boxes. I don't know how some of them still have their HANDS!

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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#365

Post by tencats » Fri Dec 29, 2017 7:21 pm

When in my woodworking shop I'm always mindful that I'm exposing myself to rather crude very sharp edged cutting tools that are for the most part under power running at high speeds. The table saw in particular I have a healthy fear and respect for knowing that I will have accidental near miss being injured about once every 5 years or so. Other hazards like airborne wood dust and poisonous vapors in the finishing materials I try to take care to limit my exposure to by wearing gloves and a respirator. Now I've found something I hadn't anticipated before being so harmful. Few week ago suffered from a severe allergic reaction to a specie of wood that I was working with, cardinal wood. I worked with cardinal wood before and never had a problem but then recently took out a new board and cut two thin strips to use for a color accent laminated over walnut wood. Shortly after I had finished the profiling on the table saw and belt sander I found myself covered with bright red patches on any areas of exposed skin. Soon later suffered the most frightening onset of respiratory distress accompanied with an odd sore throat and nausea. I fled the shop and went down to the neighbors where she shared her Cetirizine with me. Was about two hours after downing 3X5mg before I had any feeling of relief and then its been more than a week before the severe rash has showed any real improvement. Been using a topical hydrocortisone on the rash which gives some relief from the burning sensation and itch.

Image

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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#366

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Fri Dec 29, 2017 7:54 pm

Allergic reactions are a scary thing, but you're never allergic on the first exposure. Oatmeal baths helped when I had a bad reaction to some eye drops one time. Oddly enough, my eyes didn't react, just my chest and stomach.

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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#367

Post by tencats » Fri Dec 29, 2017 11:45 pm

Starting a new project as soon as I can determine how just how to do it.

Its a frame molding that I was asked to make for to two circa 1830 primitive child portraits. One measures 43 X 43 in. The second 34 X 44 in.

One portrait painting with my corner sample that I recommended but not what I'll be making. I will though be reproducing this finish on the new profile.
Image

I really like this painting here.
Image

Second portrait painting with the owners frame.
Image

The finished curly maple seen here is a frame purchased new earlier this year for the larger painting but is not liked by the owner for the strong red maple color. Also disliked is the high sheen semi gloss poly finish on the maple frame. I was at first requested adjust/change the dye color to a golden brown and over coat with a low sheen lacquer. For the second frame they requested that I make a matching new frame. I declined and suggested producing two new matching frames in a different profile that I thought would be more in keeping with the time period of the painting. I got stalled on the project again when they then requested then that I only reproduce the profile of their frame for the second new frame. For the first frame they requested that I just simply rub down the sheen to a dull sheen and the finish the new frame in a matching dye color with a low sheen finish. At that I stalled yet again and replied that I would have to think about it because I didn't think I could run the profile in a curly hard maple and not tear out the grain in the machine shaping of the profile. Actually I just disliked their requested profile and dismissed it as more appropriate for a door casing and a waste of good wood. Almost 6 weeks passed and I find out that everyone is just waiting on me to produce new frames and I thought project was taken elsewhere. Now I'm on it. I very much like the art. Will rethink on how to do new frames but I wlll use curly soft soft maple in a scaled up profile.

Here is the requested profile that I don't like. Its too flat and thin in the rabbit.

Image

Here is what I want but haven't quite have it planned out on how to do it. My soft figured maple I have is only 3/4 inch and will need to be built up to 1 1/2 inch.

Image

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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#368

Post by RoadScholar » Sun Dec 31, 2017 7:15 pm

Tearout is a heartbreaker.

I’d sharpen the hell out of HSS shaper knives and use a power feeder to climb-cut the figured wood. But most folks don’t have that option.

Maybe a skew cut on the table saw for the concave? Then facets for the roundovers and sand from there?
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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#369

Post by tencats » Mon Jan 01, 2018 7:07 pm

RoadScholar wrote:
Sun Dec 31, 2017 7:15 pm
Tearout is a heartbreaker.

I’d sharpen the hell out of HSS shaper knives and use a power feeder to climb-cut the figured wood. But most folks don’t have that option.

Maybe a skew cut on the table saw for the concave? Then facets for the roundovers and sand from there?
Gave up on the wood shapers long ago. The low rpm and the large knife heads scared me away. Never had a stock feeder just my fingers and a few feather boards.

Once I got to working on it it wasn't as difficult as I had been thinking. Mostly I just didn't like the profile but now that I finished forty linear feet I'm liking it. Not liking the original wide thin profile but like very much the effect of the build up and the higher angle to bring the front up made all the difference. I was surprised to have had no problem with tear out. I used some nicely figured curly soft maple which further impressed me on how nicely it finished. I had never thought much of soft maples before and made use of it only for interior framing or paint grade core framing. The nicely figured maple I used here came from Home Depot. One Home Depot in my area frequently will have a few curly soft maple boards mixed in with their S4S bin.

Used a eight inch twenty tooth Freud box joint blade set here and two Amana router profile bits on a router table. Hand scrapers finished the last bit of the profile. For the large concave section of the profile I ran the lengths of maple at a angle of 50 deg into the side of saw blade.

Image

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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#370

Post by tencats » Mon Jan 01, 2018 9:32 pm

Sugar Magnolia wrote:
Fri Dec 29, 2017 7:54 pm
Allergic reactions are a scary thing, but you're never allergic on the first exposure.
Heh, I never would have thought. Its been something like six weeks ago that I got into trouble working the cardinal wood and yet the residual dust is burning my hands and face again last few days. It seems like the dust its now spread over a wider area. Good grief its potent. I'm thinking how I could have just as likely have cut up a much larger portion of the one board. If I had continued working any more that day I would be ruined. Tomorrow I'm going to risk using a high pressure air to blow as much dust out the windows as I can find. Triple washed my shop coats and gloves.

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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#371

Post by RoadScholar » Mon Jan 01, 2018 10:51 pm

HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES

Quinones

The culprit behind most of these allergies is a group of naturally occurring chemicals called quinones. They represent just a few of the numerous extractives residing in the heartwood and other tissues of various species, which are produced as defensive agents against fungal, microbial, and other predator attacks (including woodworkers and jewelry collectors). Quinones are often used to make dyes; for example, lawsone, the active ingredient in the henna plants Lawsonia inermis and L. alba, is the red-orange colored pigment 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthaquinone, a molecule known as hennotannic acid. Though they also have potential cosmetic (such as their use in skin-lightening formulas) and medicinal uses (various quinones have been studied for their antibacterial, anti-tumor, and cancer fighting abilities) in non-allergic humans, quinones play a major role in allergic contact dermatitis caused by plants.

The primary "allergens are benzoquinones or naphthoquinones but also compounds, such as catechols and other phenolic or flavonoid compounds, which are bioconverted [metabolized] into ortho-quinones or para-quinones." 3 These derivatives can covalently bond to skin proteins. Since they are not recognized by the immune system, they are attacked. Catechol is a main constituent of urushiol, which is the allergen in poison ivy. Certain types of coumarins can also be sensitizers when they form ortho-quinones via enzymatic oxidation within the skin.

It is possible that once sensitized to one of these quinones that cross reactions to similar quinones and/or compounds can develop. In other words, a reaction to a quinone component of one wood can make someone more susceptible to future reactions to other wood allergens.

:snippity:

Piratinera guianensis and P. paraense syn. Brosimum guianense and B. paraense (Snakewood and Satine Bloodwood, Cardinalwood): Quinones were discovered in the wood (Hausen 1970). 6

http://www.organicjewelry.com/woodhazards.html
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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#372

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Jan 07, 2018 8:54 pm

Picked from the Youtube




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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#373

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Jan 08, 2018 2:35 pm

Woodworkers gun safe


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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#374

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Mon Jan 08, 2018 7:20 pm

RTH10260 wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 2:35 pm
Woodworkers gun safe

That'll be useful when someone breaks in your house.

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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#375

Post by JohnPCapitalist » Mon Jan 08, 2018 8:59 pm

Saw this bowl on YouTube. Most amazing thing I've ever seen. Made me put woodturning on my bucket list for 2018, but the problem is that the local maker space doesn't have a lathe. Sigh.


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