Fogbow woodworkers' club

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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#301

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Oct 10, 2017 8:44 pm

RoadScholar wrote:
Tue Oct 10, 2017 1:08 pm

For inspiration.
Now that's a beauty! I wonder how many trees had to be sculptured until this very one with its beautifully flowing textures was found :thumbs:

This is the FB page of the artist with several pictures during the creation, plus other woodwork by her.

Gabi Rizea (Rumania)



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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#302

Post by RoadScholar » Tue Oct 10, 2017 10:19 pm

Cool! Thanks! Image was sent me sans attribution.


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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#303

Post by tencats » Tue Oct 10, 2017 10:35 pm

RoadScholar wrote:
Tue Oct 10, 2017 8:18 pm
Very nice stopped rabbets. How much was handwerk?
Almost none here when I working with a hard white oak. Just a little tweaking with a paring chisel and fine tooth rasp.
Later I will post a pic of the end grain view and it show that I have added stop blocks at the ends but with care that the end grain pattern is near perfect. I have to do a sample of this frame but large scale version in Mahogany and that one I will do the end stopped rabbits by hand.



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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#304

Post by Notorial Dissent » Tue Oct 10, 2017 11:19 pm

RoadScholar wrote:
Tue Oct 10, 2017 1:08 pm
IMG_3874.JPG

For inspiration.
That is the work of a truly warped and twisted mind, AND I LOVE IT....


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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#305

Post by Notorial Dissent » Tue Oct 10, 2017 11:20 pm

Tencats, that is lovely work, a perfect craftsman style frame that really goes well with that picture, and the dark finis his the right one for that style, and I think it looks best with the picture. The light golden stain would be perfect for a burled wood and would show it off to perfection.


The fact that you sincerely and wholeheartedly believe that the “Law of Gravity” is unconstitutional and a violation of your sovereign rights, does not absolve you of adherence to it.

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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#306

Post by tencats » Wed Oct 11, 2017 2:43 am

Notorial Dissent wrote:
Tue Oct 10, 2017 11:20 pm
Tencats, that is lovely work, a perfect craftsman style frame that really goes well with that picture, and the dark finis his the right one for that style, and I think it looks best with the picture. The light golden stain would be perfect for a burled wood and would show it off to perfection.
Oh, thank you for that comment. I always try to do my best in my work. I have had no real training in my craft and never studied art in college but hope I have in time acquired a good feel for whats right. In all the years that I have worked with other peoples art and collections I almost never get any feedback either good or bad, it just goes out and it's " no news is good news " about how my work was received. When I do get a request for my wood work its through a Gallery and I have no contact with the end client.



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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#307

Post by RoadScholar » Wed Oct 11, 2017 2:44 am

A wise fellow once told me "the best work disappears."


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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#308

Post by Notorial Dissent » Wed Oct 11, 2017 5:12 am

tencats wrote:
Wed Oct 11, 2017 2:43 am
Notorial Dissent wrote:
Tue Oct 10, 2017 11:20 pm
Tencats, that is lovely work, a perfect craftsman style frame that really goes well with that picture, and the dark finis his the right one for that style, and I think it looks best with the picture. The light golden stain would be perfect for a burled wood and would show it off to perfection.
Oh, thank you for that comment. I always try to do my best in my work. I have had no real training in my craft and never studied art in college but hope I have in time acquired a good feel for whats right. In all the years that I have worked with other peoples art and collections I almost never get any feedback either good or bad, it just goes out and it's " no news is good news " about how my work was received. When I do get a request for my wood work its through a Gallery and I have no contact with the end client.
You're entirely welcome. The best work of that period and style compliments the work by being subtle and right.
.


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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#309

Post by tencats » Fri Oct 13, 2017 3:21 pm

Needing to replenish my depleted bin of 6/4 Tulip Popular and also needing a board or two of flat cut 8/4 Sugar Maple I decided to take a drive up to a Wisconsin mill that I know. Weather is so nice at this time of year that I just started out without calling ahead to inquire as to availability of my wants. Its 280 miles round trip mostly interstate highway but the last 50 miles is mostly by rural winding county roads through rolling hills,farms and fields. When I get to the mill they tell me that all the popular is gone. While I'm welcome to toss the packages of Maple however its been all picked over several times and now is only all lower common grade. Well then I can use Basswood in place of the Popular. But I have no luck with the Basswood either, its only 4/4, all the 8/4 someone came and took out two days ago. It was a nice drive up there, the air has that hint of the fall season, the fall color in the trees is just beginning to show. I had to find something to return with and while I was sure not needing it, this is what I came back with.

Seven planks of 8/4 Black Walnut that appear to be all from one large log. Very dense fine grained example. Not steamed, although I lately prefer steamed Walnut.

Image

Two planks here 14 and 16 inches wide 104 inches in length. Sequence matched pair and with strongly figured ends.

Image

They leave by myself to search through the packages of lumber and I usually can find something, but not much anything else this time. Looked over the Butternut, Cherry, Red Elm, Ash, Sycamore, Boxelder, White and Red Pine, White Oak, lots and lots of Red Oak. I'm always on alert for any Burr Oaks and I think I see some but its buried and I wasn't felling up to the heavy unloading of the that package to get at it. I'll go back at the end of the month.

There's more then lumber there in the shed if if look carefully enough for it. Up on the sill of an old boarded up window way in the back there was this.

Image



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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#310

Post by tencats » Mon Oct 16, 2017 8:01 pm

Making progress on my pair of cross corner frames.

Expect to finish two frames later today. Both frames measure approx 19 X 23 inches inside the rabbit and 1 inch square in cross section.

Here is an example of the fumed oak compared to the non fumed oak. This fumed sample is of a rather strong fumed color which was the result after 90 minutes in the fuming box .

Image

Preparing the 3/8 in diameter pegs for the corners. Making two sets of pegs as I'm not decided how much contrast I want to have between the finished frame color and the domed pegs.

Image

Here is the label on the strong aqueous solution of ammonium hydroxide that I use for fuming oak wood.

Image



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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#311

Post by RoadScholar » Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:17 pm

tencats wrote:
Fri Oct 13, 2017 3:21 pm
Needing to replenish my depleted bin of 6/4 Tulip Popular and also needing a board or two of flat cut 8/4 Sugar Maple I decided to take a drive up to a Wisconsin mill that I know... ...I had to find something to return with and while I was sure not needing it, this is what I came back with.

They leave by myself to search through the packages of lumber and I usually can find something, but not much anything else this time. Looked over the Butternut, Cherry, Red Elm, Ash, Sycamore, Boxelder, White and Red Pine, White Oak, lots and lots of Red Oak. I'm always on alert for any Burr Oaks and I think I see some but its buried and I wasn't felling up to the heavy unloading of the that package to get at it. I'll go back at the end of the month.
Ever use Sycamore cut quarter-sawn? It's wild, especially when the log is also curly.
IMG_0672.JPG
Even when not gotten out intentionally quarter-sawn, you can sometimes spot a few boards that just ended up that way in the course of regular sawmill runs.
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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#312

Post by tencats » Tue Oct 17, 2017 5:51 am

RoadScholar wrote:
Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:17 pm
tencats wrote:
Fri Oct 13, 2017 3:21 pm
Needing to replenish my depleted bin of 6/4 Tulip Popular and also needing a board or two of flat cut 8/4 Sugar Maple I decided to take a drive up to a Wisconsin mill that I know... ...I had to find something to return with and while I was sure not needing it, this is what I came back with.

They leave by myself to search through the packages of lumber and I usually can find something, but not much anything else this time. Looked over the Butternut, Cherry, Red Elm, Ash, Sycamore, Boxelder, White and Red Pine, White Oak, lots and lots of Red Oak. I'm always on alert for any Burr Oaks and I think I see some but its buried and I wasn't felling up to the heavy unloading of the that package to get at it. I'll go back at the end of the month.
Ever use Sycamore cut quarter-sawn? It's wild, especially when the log is also curly.
IMG_0672.JPG
Even when not gotten out intentionally quarter-sawn, you can sometimes spot a few boards that just ended up that way in the course of regular sawmill runs.
Yes and only just this past week I pulled a huge plank out the far back of my shop. I have only a few Sycamore planks and they are all extra wide 8/4 and near perfectly quarter sawn across twenty four plus inches in width. I only rarely have found Sycamore available as I'm located on the far edge of its natural growth range. When I first look at Sycamore wood I think I like it but then viewing it as a whole I find the roey grain very unfavorable. Very much similar to the roey grain I find in Birch that I very much dislike. Currently I would like to get a four inch wide quarter sawn narrow "flake" figure in an upcoming project but it can't be roey. Sycamore wood is also the most wimpy wood I have experienced in use. Never completed a finished sample although I started on one a few times but decided it wouldn't take a good finish. I think though that I would like to execute something small in scale like a pencil box where the Sycamore's fine "flake" figured could be attractive.

Another wood species that I have in good quantity that I just can't find much use for is Butternut or sometimes called white Walnut. I see you are out east. Do you find and have you worked ever with Butternut wood? I like Butternut wood when I view the rough milled board but after surfacing I don't like it much and return it to the bin. Its a shame too because throughout the mid west Butternut has been decimated by the butternut canker disease. Its mostly not available as lumber and whats is available is now the dead and dying few trees that are being harvested. Most excellent beautiful wood for hand carving though. If anyone is interested in about the uncertain future of the Butternut tree here is a link to an article. http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/28/scien ... utter.html And here. http://www.venerabletrees.org/plight-butternut/
Very sad and more recently our beautiful Ash trees are dying and are rapidly being cut down throughout the mid western states.



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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#313

Post by Maybenaut » Tue Oct 17, 2017 11:24 am

RoadScholar wrote:
Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:17 pm
tencats wrote:
Fri Oct 13, 2017 3:21 pm
Needing to replenish my depleted bin of 6/4 Tulip Popular and also needing a board or two of flat cut 8/4 Sugar Maple I decided to take a drive up to a Wisconsin mill that I know... ...I had to find something to return with and while I was sure not needing it, this is what I came back with.

They leave by myself to search through the packages of lumber and I usually can find something, but not much anything else this time. Looked over the Butternut, Cherry, Red Elm, Ash, Sycamore, Boxelder, White and Red Pine, White Oak, lots and lots of Red Oak. I'm always on alert for any Burr Oaks and I think I see some but its buried and I wasn't felling up to the heavy unloading of the that package to get at it. I'll go back at the end of the month.
Ever use Sycamore cut quarter-sawn? It's wild, especially when the log is also curly.
IMG_0672.JPG
Even when not gotten out intentionally quarter-sawn, you can sometimes spot a few boards that just ended up that way in the course of regular sawmill runs.
A sycamore dulcimer? :lovestruck:



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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#314

Post by jmj » Tue Oct 17, 2017 11:28 am

tencats wrote:
Tue Oct 17, 2017 5:51 am
RoadScholar wrote:
Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:17 pm
Ever use Sycamore cut quarter-sawn? It's wild, especially when the log is also curly.
IMG_0672.JPG
Even when not gotten out intentionally quarter-sawn, you can sometimes spot a few boards that just ended up that way in the course of regular sawmill runs.
Yes and only just this past week I pulled a huge plank out the far back of my shop. I have only a few Sycamore planks and they are all extra wide 8/4 and near perfectly quarter sawn across twenty four plus inches in width. I only rarely have found Sycamore available as I'm located on the far edge of its natural growth range. When I first look at Sycamore wood I think I like it but then viewing it as a whole I find the roey grain very unfavorable. Very much similar to the roey grain I find in Birch that I very much dislike. Currently I would like to get a four inch wide quarter sawn narrow "flake" figure in an upcoming project but it can't be roey. Sycamore wood is also the most wimpy wood I have experienced in use. Never completed a finished sample although I started on one a few times but decided it wouldn't take a good finish. I think though that I would like to execute something small in scale like a pencil box where the Sycamore's fine "flake" figured could be attractive.
I've always kind of liked the look of quartersawn sycamore, but it's a bit difficult to come by around here in Minnesota. Someday I'd like to try it. I wasn't really familiar with the term "roey". I think I have an idea of what it means by doing some searching online. What is it about "roey grain" that you dislike? The appearance, or the workability?

If you don't want your quartersawn 24-inch-wide sycamore planks anymore, I'm sure I could find somewhere for you to dispose of them ;)



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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#315

Post by RoadScholar » Tue Oct 17, 2017 2:34 pm

My first wood working job was an apprenticeship with a Luthier. We made Renaissance, Medieval and Baroque stringed instruments at James Cox, Luthier, Ltd.

That was in 1975. Jim, who later built a Cello for Yoyo Ma, is a good friend to this day.

We made Violas da Gamba and Lutes in curly Maple of course, but also made Gambas in quartersawn Sycamore (and the occasional Vielle or Rebec). Sycamore is related to the London Plane Tree, and there is evidence that instruments were made from it; plus, Sycamore is a cambium-reversing species. Most trees, the outer growing layer spirals slightly, but always the same way. In Sycamore (and Willow, I think) it reverses every so often, so it's like nature's plywood.

So it does NOT like to split, which is why the thin strips of wood that go into strawberry baskets are often Sycamore. That and it's totally non-toxic. If you're ever splitting logs from unknown trees and the axe-head just buries itself in the log without a hint of a split, it's probably Sycamore. Folks have lost splitting wedges in hunks of Sycamore and had to chain-saw them out.

Which is why we thought it would be good for the wide sides and backs of Gambas, where splitting is often an issue. Its muted resonance character is (we thought) well-suited to the rather poignant, some say mournful, sound of Renaissance bowed instruments which is a result of their not having sound-posts and being gut-strung. In the Violin Family (and in the later Gambas) a sound-post propped between the top and back (a seriously maddening operation I can assure you) makes them vibrate in unison which, added to the metallic strings gives a strong, sharp, clean tone. The most recognizable Renaissance bowed-instrument sound in popular culture is in the soundtrack to Fargo.

A bunch of the Sycamore Gambas we made are still running around out there some place. Jim has only made modern instruments for some time now. I still have the parts to a treble Lute that I started in 1976.

Cox before+after.png
Oy.
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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#316

Post by tencats » Tue Oct 17, 2017 5:06 pm

jmj wrote:
Tue Oct 17, 2017 11:28 am

I've always kind of liked the look of quartersawn sycamore, but it's a bit difficult to come by around here in Minnesota. Someday I'd like to try it. I wasn't really familiar with the term "roey". I think I have an idea of what it means by doing some searching online. What is it about "roey grain" that you dislike? The appearance, or the workability?

If you don't want your quartersawn 24-inch-wide sycamore planks anymore, I'm sure I could find somewhere for you to dispose of them ;)
Pulled out this board this morning thinking to reevaluate it but I'm not liking it. You can see here what I describe as a roey or ropey grain pattern. I could possibly have some future use for it but only in a small scale project. I do not like flash in the grain rolling off the cut edge at angles to the quarter sawn grain lines. The resized wood in the project has a very odd texture and feel to it as its very light weight and just wimpy. Powders up when working it up with abrasives in a way that I don't care for as its similar to an overly dry wood that was milled after the tree had been long time standing dead. I sold several planks of this Sycamore recently this past May and cut it up into strips 5/8 X 2 inch in nominal lengths. It was for paint grade interior trim work in a renovated home. Contractor wanted popular but as I had none I substituted the order with the Sycamore. The request was one of those where they call me late the day before they need it and want to pick it up from me early the next day.

Image

Close up of grain figure detail on 2 inch by 4 inch sample area.

Image



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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#317

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Tue Oct 17, 2017 5:13 pm

tencats wrote:
Tue Oct 17, 2017 5:06 pm

Close up of grain figure detail on 2 inch by 4 inch sample area.

Image
And my artist's eye just shivers at the beauty of that pattern. I can understand the material not behaving as you want it to, but the grain pattern as a stand-alone visual texture is absolutely gorgeous. It looks like the beach sand at low tide.



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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#318

Post by tencats » Tue Oct 17, 2017 5:31 pm

RoadScholar wrote:
Tue Oct 17, 2017 2:34 pm


We made Violas da Gamba and Lutes in curly Maple of course, but also made Gambas in quartersawn Sycamore (and the occasional Vielle or Rebec). Sycamore is related to the London Plane Tree, and there is evidence that instruments were made from it; plus, Sycamore is a cambium-reversing species. Most trees, the outer growing layer spirals slightly, but always the same way. In Sycamore (and Willow, I think) it reverses every so often, so it's like nature's plywood.

So it does NOT like to split, which is why the thin strips of wood that go into strawberry baskets are often Sycamore. That and it's totally non-toxic. If you're ever splitting logs from unknown trees and the axe-head just buries itself in the log without a hint of a split, it's probably Sycamore. Folks have lost splitting wedges in hunks of Sycamore and had to chain-saw them out.

A bunch of the Sycamore Gambas we made are still running around out there some place. Jim has only made modern instruments for some time now. I still have the parts to a treble Lute that I started in 1976.
OK, I'm feeling really really bad now for cutting up my Sycamore for lowly paint grade trim. Really it did bother me at the time but I couldn't sort out the plain maple for the liner feet needed quick enough. I was at first intending to use my plain quartered Prima Vera wood but quickly set that aside when I saw the beautiful pale yellow color and sheen in those boards. Should have used the 8/4 clear white pine but ....... too late.



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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#319

Post by RoadScholar » Tue Oct 17, 2017 6:56 pm

No worries. Sycamore is all over the place, although not a lot of timber dealers carry it.

But more importantly: where the hell did you get Prima Vera? I thought that species was, like Satinwood, unobtanium! :o

We were asked to reproduce a cased opening in Prima Vera for the Hutzler Mansion some thirty years ago, and because we couldn’t find Prima Vera anywhere, at any price, we had to use Satinwood. The material alone came to $1200 in 1987 dollars.

Satinwood and Prima Vera have almost idential grain patterns, but the former is a golden color and the latter sort of a salmon color. The client, a remarkable and brave woman, took the elaborate casing we made and stained it herself to match the Prima Vera in her dining room.

394F246C-85DB-45AC-B5F2-4695FCBC6AB9.jpeg

The mansion was built as a show house for the builder; every room was a different wood. A Cherry library, a Walnut drawing-room, a quartered White Oak grand foyer and staircase, a quartered Sycamore bedroom, a curly Maple bedroom, a Cuban Mahogany bedroom, and of course the Prima Vera dining room. And more I’ve forgotten.

The structure had been abused, but within ten years she had it back to showroom condition.
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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#320

Post by tencats » Wed Oct 18, 2017 2:24 am

RoadScholar wrote:
Tue Oct 17, 2017 6:56 pm
No worries. Sycamore is all over the place, although not a lot of timber dealers carry it.

But more importantly: where the hell did you get Prima Vera? I thought that species was, like Satinwood, unobtanium! :o

We were asked to reproduce a cased opening in Prima Vera for the Hutzler Mansion some thirty years ago, and because we couldn’t find Prima Vera anywhere, at any price, we had to use Satinwood. The material alone came to $1200 in 1987 dollars.

Satinwood and Prima Vera have almost idential grain patterns, but the former is a golden color and the latter sort of a salmon color. The client, a remarkable and brave woman, took the elaborate casing we made and stained it herself to match the Prima Vera in her dining room.
Heh, I never could find much use for Prima Vera in my endeavors at working . Think I can remember only ever finding it available once at auction and that was probably before 1980. I remember I took interest in bidding on it then because one of my professors at the University had given me a little commission work for several collections display cases. Somehow Prima Vera wood was one of the requested wood species for the box. At the time I had NO idea how or where I could find Prima Vera wood and was thinking I would be using veneers purchased from a hobby craft store. I had little money at the time but soon later attended an auction with the hope to bid on some of the smaller lots of imported lumber. To my surprise I was high bidder on 200 plus bd ft of mostly 1/2 Prima Vera boards predominately qtr sawn, 7 to 10 ft lengths. Some few thicker boards were included. Completed the Professors collection cases to his satisfaction but I was disappointed in my work because I didn't know very well how to finish my wood work back then. Early on all I knew was a brushed on orange shellac finish.

Now for Satin wood, that's a good one but I just can't find mush use for it other than for small decorative inlay work. Have only a small board or two of one inch thick likely West Indian Satinwood purchased from a MI based imported wood dealer in 1980. Then one sample of a very dense heavy Lemonwood(?). Probably fifteen years back there was a lumber dealer nearby that had for a short time a good quantity of 6/4 African Satinwood which I have only one nice board. Its got good strong yellow straw color but the grain texture is course. For Satinwood veneer I have the whole log of the genuine East Indian Satinwood that I picked up at the Benteler auction in Chicago probably back in 1984. Benteler was up until then the renowned master maker of the roulette wheels and gaming tables at US casinos. Its the old thick cut veneer which I think I've read was cut 1/28th but what I have is really thick cut. Came it its original old crate with a named N.Y. veneer broker/mill label still on it. Produced early 40's or early 50's, unfortunately I got labels mixed up between crates of veneers when I last had to relocate. This Satinwood veneer is a deep strong yellow gold color with the most pronounced mottled grain pattern resembling ripples in satin fabric. A classic. Texture is very fine and has a high glistening luster. Its absolutely, well almost the gaudiest wood you'll ever see. Every few years I think I can do something with it but as of yet haven't. I getting close though. Years back when I had a few solid wood Mahogany, Bur Oak, Wenge tables exhibited in SOFA Chicago I had one low table of good size in satinwood in the show. Had Ebony/Holly/Pernambuco wood inlays in the Satinwood veneered top. Later the table was shipped to a New York SOFA show to be exhibited. I never could decide if I liked or hated that table but that is the only time I had used any of the Satinwood.

I'm busy tomorrow but will try to get a photos of the Prima Vera and Satinwood inserted here later.



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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#321

Post by RoadScholar » Wed Oct 18, 2017 6:28 am

If the company was Constantine’s, they used to carry what they called “Monarch” veneers, which were cut at 1/16”. I still have some of their Macassar Ebony around someplace...


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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#322

Post by tencats » Wed Oct 18, 2017 7:27 am

RoadScholar wrote:
Wed Oct 18, 2017 6:28 am
If the company was Constantine’s, they used to carry what they called “Monarch” veneers, which were cut at 1/16”. I still have some of their Macassar Ebony around someplace...
Not Constantine’s. When I first started dabbling at woodworking I frequented Craftsmens Wood Service. They were my first wood source and yet today have a quantity of their turning blocks and squares of East Indian Rosewood, Cocobolo, Brazilian Rosewood. One more that I discovered at Craftsmen's and have ever since highly valued and used is the most beautiful Goncalvo Alves wood.
Craftsman Wood Service Co. Catalogue
I think I remember subscribing to Constantine’s mail order catalog but never ordered anything from them. I do remember the “Monarch” veneers in the catalog. I was very early doing some bent lamination in Cherry wood but am blanking where I sourced the thin cut cherry wood from.



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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#323

Post by tencats » Wed Oct 18, 2017 7:40 pm

tencats wrote:
Wed Oct 18, 2017 2:24 am
RoadScholar wrote:
Tue Oct 17, 2017 6:56 pm
Satinwood and Prima Vera have almost idential grain patterns, but the former is a golden color and the latter sort of a salmon color. The client, a remarkable and brave woman, took the elaborate casing we made and stained it herself to match the Prima Vera in her dining room.
I'm busy tomorrow but will try to get a photos of the Prima Vera and Satinwood inserted here later.
Here is a sample of my rift and quartered cut Primavera wood. Photo here is of an 8 by 12 inch board section that has had its surface wetted. I'm surprised by the shift to a strong yellow gold color here when wiped with a moistened rag. The dry wood is very pale yellow in color. I wasn't expecting this much contrast in color.

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Primavera wood recently scraped and dry.

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Here is a sample of my E.I. Satinwood veneer. Veneer has been photo recorded dry and unworked.

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Again but positioned horizontally.

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tencats
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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#324

Post by tencats » Wed Oct 18, 2017 8:11 pm

Sugar Magnolia wrote:
Tue Oct 17, 2017 5:13 pm
tencats wrote:
Tue Oct 17, 2017 5:06 pm

Close up of grain figure detail on 2 inch by 4 inch sample area.

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And my artist's eye just shivers at the beauty of that pattern. I can understand the material not behaving as you want it to, but the grain pattern as a stand-alone visual texture is absolutely gorgeous. It looks like the beach sand at low tide.
How is this for a wood gain pattern. An example of rift and quartered cut wood. Do you recognize the species?

Or is it a fragment of an ancient Chinese landscape painting that was recovered from and underground tomb.

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RoadScholar
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Occupation: Historic Restoration Woodworker
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Re: Fogbow woodworkers' club

#325

Post by RoadScholar » Wed Oct 18, 2017 11:34 pm

Lacewood?

Both the Prima Vera at the Hutzler Mansion and in the grand foyer of a townhouse near the Washington Monument we worked on had a salmonish hue, a light pink/orange color. Maybe due to light exposure for 150 years? Maybe they were both stained, but the color sure was similar.

I've heard that figure in the Satinwood pictures you posted referred to as "bees' wing." You hear that too? I'm getting a little vague on such detail these days.

I better write my millwork manual while I've still got the concentration. There's lots of books on all kinds of woodwork, but few on reproducing historic architectural millwork,


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