Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

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Volkonski
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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#426

Post by Volkonski »

Eagles Spotted In Osprey Nest Near Dangerous, High Voltage Wires
PSEG Long Island came to the rescue to move the wires and keep the bald eagles safe.


https://patch.com/new-york/northfork/s/ ... aign=alert
According to Elizabeth Flagler, media representative for PSEG Long Island, the eagles were spotted on March 18 in the nest, which sits atop a 100-foot pole on Jessup Lane.

"We have a team of employees dedicated to monitoring the activity of osprey, and now eagles, on our equipment," she said. "They jumped into action when they noticed the nest was built around the wires carrying 13,000 volts."

Crews safely diverted the wires two feet below the nest to give ample clearance to protect the nest and the birds, she said.

"We work hard all year to identify nests on the equipment and remediate where necessary," Flagler said. "We have relocated two dozen nests to safer platforms to protect the birds and the electric system."


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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#427

Post by kate520 »

I kept a well-stocked feeder on my yard until our dog, a black pug just like our new pup, got a bad case of sticktight fleas.

They are avian-borne and only touch the ground to lay eggs/be born, then they grab the nearest feather and climb aboard. Tiny, hard to grab, they lined his eyebrows like a carapace. They also lined the inside of his ears and between his toes.

I worked with tweezers and alcohol for two hours and removed a couple hundred :shock: but couldn’t get them all. A trip to the vet got the rest -325 more!

The side street cul-de-sac where we live is called Sycamore place. It’s lined along its short length with, you guessed it, sycamores. It’s always a mess with leaves and branches strewn everywhere. In spring it is full of birds, building nests, having territorial aerial battles, and making babies. I counted 3 different small woodpecker species last year -no pileated so far- and numerous small BBS.

Yesterday I put my veggie garden out in pots on the front porch, the best possible view of the birded sycamores. It’s the only place where the chickens won’t ravage it. I have my binocs ready And I plan to do a lot if sitting and watching.

Foggy, meet Rudy, my gorgeous, beloved rooster. He’s such a good bird. Even mr520, who has been known to bolt out of bed buck naked at 5:30am to shoot a crowing cock with a BB gun, likes him. 😉
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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#428

Post by MsDaisy »

Volkonski wrote: Sat Apr 04, 2020 1:22 pm Eagles Spotted In Osprey Nest Near Dangerous, High Voltage Wires
PSEG Long Island came to the rescue to move the wires and keep the bald eagles safe.


https://patch.com/new-york/northfork/s/ ... aign=alert
:snippity:
Several years ago we had breakfast one morning at a little local restaurant that's probably been here for 50 years. When we went out to the car we saw a black vulture land on a transformer and sparks started flying. Within seconds the entire bird was on fire. That was a horrible sight to see. :cantlook:


Birfers are toast
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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#429

Post by Maybenaut »

Tiredretiredlawyer wrote: Thu Apr 02, 2020 12:09 pm The little birds return about 4:00 p.m. for evening silflay.
:lovestruck: :lovestruck: :lovestruck:


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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#430

Post by MsDaisy »

Interesting story...

These Birds Eat Fire, or Close to It, to Live Another Day
A willingness to experiment with new foods and ways of foraging may make some birds less vulnerable to extinction.
Rufous treepies, birds in the crow family native to South and Southeast Asia, usually eat insects, seeds or fruits. But some of them have learned to eat fire.

Well, not exactly, but close. At a small temple in the Indian state of Gujarat, the caretakers regularly set out small votive candles made with clarified butter. The birds flit down to steal the candles, extinguish the butter-soaked wicks with a quick shake of their heads and then gulp them down.

This willingness to experiment with new foods and ways of foraging is an indicator of behavioral flexibility, and some scientists think it is evidence that certain species of birds might be less vulnerable to extinction.

“The idea is that if a species has individuals that are capable of these novel behaviors, they’ll respond with changes in their behavior more easily than individuals from species that do not tend to produce novel behaviors like that,” said Louis Lefebvre, a professor at McGill University in Montreal and an author on the study. “The idea is pretty simple. The problem was to be able to test it in a convincing way.”
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/28/scie ... e=Homepage


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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#431

Post by Chilidog »

Got a couple new bird feeders today, a cylinder cake feeder and a simple oriole feeder.

I'm hoping to get some of the double stuffed orioles. ;)


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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#432

Post by tek »

new neighbors, a couple nights ago..
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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#433

Post by kate520 »

I'm hoping to get some of the double stuffed orioles. ;)
;)


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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#434

Post by AndyinPA »

https://www.wpxi.com/news/top-stories/m ... 5VE3ZZ4WQ/
According to BirdCast, a collaboration between the EPA, the National Audubon Society, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, and other institutions, the birds will be in the sky above Pittsburgh around 7 p.m. Over Philadelphia, there could be more than 41,000 birds and over Harrisburg, there could be more than 50,000.
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Predictions estimate nearly 400 million birds will be journeying south on Sunday and Tuesday nights, and nearly 500 million birds on Monday night. This is expected to be one the largest migration events of the fall. Tropical systems Sally and Paulette are also impacting bird migration patterns.


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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#435

Post by MN-Skeptic »

But Trump says that all the windmills are killing the birds.


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It’s the pandemic, stupid!
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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#436

Post by Sugar Magnolia »

Looked out the kitchen window yesterday, watching the hummingbird dogfights, and noticed a huge hawk just sitting on the edge of the bird bath. He hung out for a good while, just chilling and checking things out. Then he fluffed his feathers up, did that shoulder shrug thing and took off. We were so surprised to see him so close we didn't even get a photo!


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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#437

Post by pipistrelle »

Sugar Magnolia wrote: Mon Sep 14, 2020 6:40 am Looked out the kitchen window yesterday, watching the hummingbird dogfights, and noticed a huge hawk just sitting on the edge of the bird bath. He hung out for a good while, just chilling and checking things out. Then he fluffed his feathers up, did that shoulder shrug thing and took off. We were so surprised to see him so close we didn't even get a photo!
A “rouse,” sign of a content bird.


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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#438

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

I ordered a book with bird sounds so I can identify the birds by sound in our woodland backyard. It hasn't yet arrived so I use the Cornell Lab's bird identifier.

I can identify cardinals, blue jays, crows(really hard NOT), kites, wrens, mourning doves, and just recently the yellow bellied sapsuckers (it has a red yarmulke if you're looking.)

The problem is these birds have more than one call and they have answering calls which are similar, but like a counterpoint call. Any Fogbow suggestions?


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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#439

Post by Grumpy Old Guy »

Tiredretiredlawyer wrote: Mon Sep 14, 2020 11:01 am I ordered a book with bird sounds so I can identify the birds by sound in our woodland backyard. It hasn't yet arrived so I use the Cornell Lab's bird identifier.

I can identify cardinals, blue jays, crows(really hard NOT), kites, wrens, mourning doves, and just recently the yellow bellied sapsuckers (it has a red yarmulke if you're looking.)

The problem is these birds have more than one call and they have answering calls which are similar, but like a counterpoint call. Any Fogbow suggestions?
I have the Audubon app. Be warned, it takes a lot of memory.


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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#440

Post by RTH10260 »

:confused: an audio book :?:

I remember actually from a prior life where magazines would contain a cardboard inlet with impressed audio for the 45rpm record player, also thin vinyl foil embeded.

Does that make me :geezertowel:


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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#441

Post by Azastan »

Tiredretiredlawyer wrote: Mon Sep 14, 2020 11:01 am

The problem is these birds have more than one call and they have answering calls which are similar, but like a counterpoint call. Any Fogbow suggestions?
Basically you want to concentrate on learning, really learning, the calls of the birds you hear all the time.

For instance, here where I am, I hear dark-eyed juncos, black-capped chickadees, Steller's jays, Barred Owls, and Pileated Woodpeckers every day. I often have chestnut-backed chickadees, Hairy and Downy Woodpeckers, Red-naped and Red-breasted Sapsuckers (Red-naped is the equivalent of your Yellow-bellied Sapsucker), Northern Flicker, Brown Creepers, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Bushtits. Killdeer, American Robin, Swainson's Thrush and Varied Thrush show up at the appropriate time of the year.

I know all the backyard birds, so I listen for songs I don't know. Some songs/calls are easy--Pileated Woodpeckers, Barred Owls, Killdeer, Swainson's Thrush and Varied Thrush are distinctive. Some are not. The two chickadees sound almost identical, and there's actually four species of chickadee in WA (Black-capped, Chestnut-backed, Mountain, and Boreal) which all sound similar!

It's mostly listening over and over to the songs, and having a good memory for them.


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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#442

Post by jmj »

Tiredretiredlawyer wrote: Mon Sep 14, 2020 11:01 am I ordered a book with bird sounds so I can identify the birds by sound in our woodland backyard. It hasn't yet arrived so I use the Cornell Lab's bird identifier.

I can identify cardinals, blue jays, crows(really hard NOT), kites, wrens, mourning doves, and just recently the yellow bellied sapsuckers (it has a red yarmulke if you're looking.)

The problem is these birds have more than one call and they have answering calls which are similar, but like a counterpoint call. Any Fogbow suggestions?
A worthwhile endeavor. May I ask what book you're getting? I have these books and I think they're pretty good. My kids loved playing with them (although they're not necessarily aimed at kids) and I like the fact that they have a medium-ish number of different species -- more than just the super-common species, but also not so many of the rarer species that it overwhelms you.

I second Azastan's suggestions. When I was trying to learn bird sounds, I tried to always be listening and identifying birds every time I was outside. If I heard a bird sound, i would try to match it to a sound I knew. If it didn't match anything I knew, I would try to get a view of the bird that was making the sound. The more effort you spend finding the bird, the better you'll remember that sound next time you hear it ;)

Eventually you build up a knowledge base of the common species and the variety of different sounds that they make. Once you have that foundation, it gets really fun, because when you hear a sound that you don't know, you can be pretty sure that it's something exciting that you don't see every day.
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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#443

Post by Northland10 »

A couple weeks back I tried to take a photo of a hawk on a nearby telephone pole. It did not work out well so i later got my good camera with zoom up and working again. The hawk was back (or it was the other one) and sitting on a wire right outside my window. After fumbling with the camera, I got it up, pointed and, it took off. Doh. I got a lovely blur.

One thing I did learn about Chickadee calls is that their Dee Dee call has 5 or more dees when predator like the hawk are around.

I have taken to birdwatching while holed up at home.


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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#444

Post by Azastan »

Another interesting way to identify birds, especially waterfowl, is to listen to sounds made during flight.

For instance, you can tell a broad-winged male hummingbird by listening for a high pitched trill made by the wing feathers.



Most rural people have heard nighthawks 'boom'.

Bear in mind that many species have different calls for males and females.


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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#445

Post by Volkonski »



Wildlife experts in New Mexico say birds in the region are dropping dead in alarming numbers, potentially in the "hundreds of thousands;" ask the public for help. https://t.co/gtOW6LOUg5


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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#446

Post by fierceredpanda »

:(


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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#447

Post by AndyinPA »

https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... ern-us-aoe
Thousands of migrating birds have inexplicably died in south-western US in what ornithologists have described as a national tragedy that is likely to be related to the climate crisis.

Flycatchers, swallows and warblers are among the species “falling out of the sky” as part of a mass die-off across New Mexico, Colorado, Texas, Arizona and farther north into Nebraska, with growing concerns there could be hundreds of thousands dead already, said Martha Desmond, a professor in the biology department at New Mexico State University (NMSU). Many carcasses have little remaining fat reserves or muscle mass, with some appearing to have nose-dived into the ground mid-flight.

“I collected over a dozen in just a two-mile stretch in front of my house,” said Desmond. “To see this and to be picking up these carcasses and realising how widespread this is, is personally devastating. To see this many individuals and species dying is a national tragedy.”
Cross-posting.


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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#448

Post by Northland10 »

So, how long till somebody blames it on Antifa?


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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#449

Post by Volkonski »

As Wildfire Smoke Blots Out the Sun in Northern California, Many Ask: ‘Where Are the Birds?’
Extreme temperatures and fires stoked by climate change can have dire consequences for creatures living on the edge.


https://insideclimatenews.org/news/1009 ... ium=social
"I live in Folsom—have not seen a bird or heard a bird chirp this morning," said Jodi Root, a member of the California Birding group on Facebook.

"We live in northern Nevada and have noticed the same thing," added Karen Holden of Gardnerville.

"Same here in Napa," said Tammy Saunders "very quiet which just adds to the eeriness of the orange colored dark sky."

And on it went. Nearly 100 serious birdwatchers from throughout California and parts of Nevada responded to an impromptu survey posted on the Facebook group. And the majority said they had observed a pronounced drop in the number of birds flying in for a nibble at feeders or sips of water at bird baths, as well as a reduction in the variety of species.


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Re: Fogbow Birdwatchers Club

#450

Post by kate520 »

I just saw my first Northern Flicker! In my yard!
I Don’t think they’re common here.
3614C420-29F7-4FC4-A4AD-F8F870198FEB.jpeg
Sorry for the terrible photo through a dirty window.
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