At The Movies, comments and reviews

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Bill_G
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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#651

Post by Bill_G » Sat Mar 24, 2018 11:09 am

What do you do on a Friday night when the Mrs. isn't feeling good, goes to bed early, and all you have to look forward to is the cat wanting to perch on your shoulder? You fire up some Bollywood on Netflix of course!

Last night's selection was Baahubali - The Beginning ... because there's Baahubali - The Conclusion, and you should always start a story on the first page, if possible, especially with epic tales such as this. Think Braveheart India Style. Only with more colorful costumes, and a lot more dancing and singing than Braveheart. Lots. Even during battle.

There's plenty of action for violence junkies. Gotta have that. But, Bollywood sensibilities require stylized violence. So, you get a sanitized version of warfare and death gore. You get to see the protagonist hack limbs from a distance. Heads fly after his swords swings, or he just takes it off with brute strength, landing perfectly piked on a tree, as seen from the nose bleed seats. Not a lot blood spurting details.

And like modern Kung Fu movies, much of the action is highly improbable. ie: the ability to run across the top of a bamboo forest while having a sword fight. In Bollywood, you can climb a waterfall, leap to a roof like a ninja, do a triple somersault, spike the landing, and stab the guard without attracting any attention just before you start your assault on the Raja's throne room.

Be prepared for cultural insights. Besides the costumes, the henna tattoos, and the jewelry, the class distinctions are on display. And the lines are reinforced and highlighted for those unfamiliar with where they are. Royalty is royalty, commoners are common, and slaves are slaves for life. The obligations pass from generation to generation. And everybody loves it, at least according to the story tellers. That's why they fight so valiantly - they want to preserve their way of life. (cough)

Now, if Hindi is not your native tongue, and you have difficulty reading the English captions, there are several versions based on language. You can get it in Samil, or Malaysian too if you desire.

So, there you have it. An almost three hour show with spectacular scenery, period costumes, beautiful people, epic battles, singing, dancing, romance, love, lust, loss, and luxury. And, don't forget, there a Part 2 if you want more.

Enjoy!

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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#652

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Sat Mar 24, 2018 11:15 am

:thumbs: :thumbs: Bollywood sounds wonderful. Thanks for the review!
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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#653

Post by Bill_G » Sat Mar 24, 2018 11:37 am

You're welcome. It is a wonderful experience. You get to see the world through someone else's eyes from an entirely different perspective. Even when your rational mind is rebelling at the absurdity of the hyperbolic scenes, you are drawn in by the beauty of the subtle differences. it is mindfully delicious.

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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#654

Post by gupwalla » Mon Mar 26, 2018 6:33 pm

I, Tonya - funny and moving, worthy of its 90% Tomatoes rating, and Allison Janney totally owns her Supporting Actress Oscar. Worth a rent.

Next in queue: some billboards.
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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#655

Post by ZekeB » Mon Mar 26, 2018 7:31 pm

gupwalla wrote:
Mon Mar 26, 2018 6:33 pm
Next in queue: some billboards.
I saw it. There’s some dark humor that doesn’t fit. The timelines for some injuries to heal are unreasonably short. I didn’t fall asleep while watching the film.
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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#656

Post by Bill_G » Thu Mar 29, 2018 8:54 am

gupwalla wrote:
Mon Mar 26, 2018 6:33 pm
I, Tonya - funny and moving, worthy of its 90% Tomatoes rating, and Allison Janney totally owns her Supporting Actress Oscar. Worth a rent.

Next in queue: some billboards.
I have been hesitant to watch it. We lived through the play-by-play of her drama here. She couldn't fart in public without a byline. Got a bit tiresome. So, the appetite to watch a sanitized interpretation of her life hasn't grown in me yet.

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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#657

Post by Bill_G » Thu Mar 29, 2018 9:26 am

Speaking about biopics of female athletes, I have been continuing my journey through Bollywood on Teh Netflixes. Last night's revue was "Mary Kom", the five time Women's World Champion boxer, and mother of three from India.

As sports movies go, it's your usual roller coaster battle for the protagonist. Father disapproves. Mother worries. The neighbors think she's violent and a possible danger. The trainers ignore her. She has to put in more effort to prove she's worthy of the sport, and eventually she succeeds. She wins fights, gains position in the rankings, and slowly gathers support from those that love her. Everyone is on her side when she's bringing home the gold, and she's quickly forgotten when she isn't.

She did this terrible terrible thing of falling in love, getting married, and having babies in between championships. Unheard of! (Gasp!) But, she's the come back kid, got back into shape, kicked some butt, and continued to decorate her wall with medals up to about 2016. Then she went into politics, and holds a seat now. So, as life achievement stories go, her's isn't over yet, though boxing is probably behind her.

What was fascinating for me was the insight into Indian culture, particularly the regional animosity that got played out. She's from Manipur, a Christian, and speaks a different language - none of that is well approved by other parts of the country. Besides being a woman, she had several other strikes against her within Indian Society.

The next thing on display was the open corruption. During one period between championships when she was at home caring for babies, the family income needed a boost, and she went looking for work. She was offered the lowest positions, but if she paid this amount, she would receive this position, or that one for a bit more. In other words, she has to pay her boss to get a better job which makes me imagine her boss has to pay someone else for his job, and up the ladder it goes with this stream of graft. How does a system like that even work? I don't know, but it's one of the things on her agenda now.

Overall, worth the watch. Be a quick reader. They do not hesitate to switch the subtitles about as fast as people speak.

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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#658

Post by Bill_G » Sun Apr 15, 2018 9:59 am

Tale of Tales (IL RACCONTO DEI RACCONTI)

Image

Do you want to see Salma Hayek munch down on a monster's heart like Sunday BBQ?
Would you like to win the hand of the princess by guessing what beast the hide on the wall is from?
How about becoming the paramour to the king despite being over 70 years old?

If you like period plays from 13th century Europe with their mix of splendor and filth, if you appreciate magic and wonder, if you believe that ogre's exist, and if you can deal with the vivid imagination of this director, then Tale of Tales will capture you.

On Netflix Instant now.

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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#659

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Sat May 12, 2018 2:02 pm

http://www.openculture.com/2018/04/10-g ... films.html

10 Great German Expressionist Films: From Nosferatu to The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

In 1913, Germany, flush with a new nation’s patriotic zeal, looked like it might become the dominant nation of Europe and a real rival to that global superpower Great Britain. Then it hit the buzzsaw of World War I. After the German government collapsed in 1918 from the economic and emotional toll of a half-decade of senseless carnage, the Allies forced it to accept draconian terms for surrender. The entire German culture was sent reeling, searching for answers to what happened and why.

German Expressionism came about to articulate these lacerating questions roiling in the nation’s collective unconscious. The first such film was The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920), about a malevolent traveling magician who has his servant do his murderous bidding in the dark of the night. The storyline is all about the Freudian terror of hidden subconscious drives, but what really makes the movie memorable is its completely unhinged look. Marked by stylized acting, deep shadows painted onto the walls, and sets filled with twisted architectural impossibilities -- there might not be a single right angle in the film – Caligari’s look perfectly meshes with the narrator's demented state of mind.

Nosferatu - Free - German Expressionist horror film directed by F. W. Murnau. An unauthorized adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula. (1922)

The Student of Prague - Free - A classic of German expressionist film. German writer Hanns Heinz Ewers and Danish director Stellan Rye bring to life a 19th-century horror story. Some call it the first indie film. (1913)

Nerves - Free - Directed by Robert Reinert, Nerves tells of "the political disputes of an ultraconservative factory owner Herr Roloff and Teacher John, who feels a compulsive but secret love for Roloff's sister, a left-wing radical." (1919)

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari - Free - This silent film directed by Robert Wiene is considered one of the most influential German Expressionist films and perhaps one of the greatest horror movies of all time. (1920)

M - Free - Classic film directed by Fritz Lang, with Peter Lorre. About the search for a child murderer in Berlin. (1931)
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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#660

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Sat May 12, 2018 2:11 pm

And yet all that Expressionism led to was the horror of the Holocaust and World War 2.

Enjoy art for art's sake* without imposing hope on it.

* Anybody know what film studio uses that motto? No cheating and asking Google. :fingerwag:

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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#661

Post by Estiveo » Sat May 12, 2018 2:57 pm

The one with the kitty.
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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#662

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Sat May 12, 2018 3:20 pm

Estiveo wrote:
Sat May 12, 2018 2:57 pm
The one with the kitty.
Grrrrrrrowl!

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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#663

Post by Kendra » Thu May 17, 2018 7:48 pm

Looks like we'll have to wait a bit for this one.


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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#664

Post by kate520 » Sat May 19, 2018 11:22 am

RBG! Great documentary about a great lady, much I didn't know about her life. I love that she had a goofy, very successful tax lawyer husband who adored her for her mind. Plus, she wrote a Trumpian birther joke into her lines for an opera she appeared in!
DEFEND DEMOCRACY

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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#665

Post by Lani » Thu May 31, 2018 12:42 am

Continuing our family traditional of seeing Star Wars movies together, we went to see SOLO (on Oahu the evening before my latest surgery). I'd read all of the complaining reviews, my son avoided all reviews. Here is our experienced, time tested opinion as long time Star Wars nerds: It was fun.

In many ways it reminded us of the first Star Wars, now know as Episode 4. Just go and enjoy it. Thinking not required. You can have opinions about whether the lead actor resembled Harrison Ford, or Danny Glover was a younger Lando Calrissian, blah blah blah. It was popcorn & soda fun. Lots of action, lots of twists and turns. Over the top sometimes/often. Rather mindless in many ways, just like the early films. Escapism with snacks. Loved it.
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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#666

Post by Danraft » Thu May 31, 2018 12:51 am

NPR had an interview with Danny Glover where he said as soon as he heard about a Solo based spinoff he told his agent he wanted to be Calrissian.... he got it.
Glad to hear it's worth seeing and sounds like a flick to do in a crowded theater ... :-D
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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#667

Post by Estiveo » Thu May 31, 2018 1:11 am

Donald Glover, kids. I know the name Donald is anathema these days, but Danny Glover was Lethal Weapon.
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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#668

Post by Danraft » Thu May 31, 2018 1:16 am

:oopsy:
And, he would have a horrible Calrissian, not enough smarm.
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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#669

Post by Lani » Thu May 31, 2018 1:19 am

When I googled Danny Glover, Star Wars showed up. :oops: :bag:

Anyway, the real Glover was great! Has a thing about fancy capes.
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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#670

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Thu Aug 09, 2018 1:11 pm

https://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_5b6b ... 062061ed6/
Michael Moore’s ‘Fahrenheit 11/9’ Trailer Aims To Expose Trump’s ‘Evil Genius’

In starting “Fahrenheit 11/9,” what was your intention? Did it change at all during the course of production?

Donald Trump is an evil genius. He has no intention of leaving the White House. Whenever he hears that another country has a president for life, he perks up and thinks, “I like the sound of that!” And he has an obedient political party that holds every seat of power backing him up.

American journalism schools have not trained students how to cover an authoritarian leader. Our media has no idea what it is up against. They’re getting steamrolled by a tyrant because Trump understands media and understands the country he lives in more than those that cover him do. This puts us all in grave danger. If nothing else, I hope this film exposes that grave danger and shows people the way out.
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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#671

Post by Addie » Sat Aug 11, 2018 1:59 pm



The Guardian: Dark Money: how a documentary became a political thriller

In a shocking new film about the influence of corporate finance in US politics, a film-maker and a journalist uncover a nefarious, far-reaching web
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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#672

Post by Bill_G » Sat Sep 15, 2018 11:00 am

The Founder

Here's a biopic about Ray Kroc, the founder of McDonald's, that you will love to hate. He didn't invent McDonald's. He took it. He did try to bring the McDonald brothers with him, but they didn't share his vision. Ultimately he got everything from them. Michael Keaton gives a solid performance. He kept me immersed in the story from beginning to end.

On Netflix instant now.

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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#673

Post by Orlylicious » Sun Nov 25, 2018 3:52 am

Wow! We repped Disney for the original TLK online, we had a blast, this looks awesome.
The Lion King’ Teaser Is Disney’s Biggest Preview With More Than 224M Views
by Bruce Haring November 24, 2018 12:23pm

While most Americans feasted and gave thanks on a holiday Thursday, the rest of the world was online and enjoying the first teaser trailer from the live action version of Disney’s The Lion King, propelling it to the studio’s biggest trailer bow ever.

The Lion King topped Disney, and became the #2 most-viewed trailer from any studio of all time, trailing only the debut of Avengers: Infinity War (238M views).

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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#674

Post by Suranis » Sun Nov 25, 2018 7:14 am

I'm less than enthused by the "live action" fad in Disney these days, especially after I watched this "thanks, I hate it" video from Lindsay Ellis on Beauty and the Beast, who looks back into the reasons for the live action fad, and what Disney changed in the transfer, and why. And why she hates it. And I am going to assert my individuality and say "what she said."

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Re: At The Movies, comments and reviews

#675

Post by Volkonski » Fri Jan 25, 2019 12:32 pm

I have got to see this movie.

A Few Thoughts on the Authenticity of Peter Jackson’s “They Shall Not Grow Old”

https://www.newyorker.com/news/daily-co ... _5-8-visit

Image
But the visual record is the heart of the film. With enormous audacity, Jackson and his team in New Zealand decided, in addition to restoring the footage, to “modernize” it, not merely regularizing its often staccato beat—that familiar jerky rhythm of old silent footage, produced by a mismatch of the speed at which the film camera was turned with the speed at which it’s projected now—and cleaning up its sometimes over- or underexposed light, but actually “colorizing” it to match the palette of the Western Front, and adding, in many places, an audio track carefully synched (with the help of lip readers!) to the ancient footage.

Jackson artfully has the opening sequences in the film, about the recruitment and training of Brits for the Army (early in the war, they were all willing and even eager recruits, conscription being introduced only in 1916) pass by in black and white. Only at the arrival of these men on the Western Front in Belgium and northern France does the footage spring into color—and, with a painstaking attention to detail, the colors are exactly the washed-out gray-greens and mud browns of the Belgian front, with every square of British khaki, and, occasionally, German gray, lovingly recreated. (Jackson took scouting trips to the sites of the war, and, wherever possible, found the precise locations where the footage that he was recycling had been taken, and then photographed the landscape on site in order to match it, earth tint for earth tint, in the lab.)

The result is, in its way, as eerie and enthralling, albeit with a completely opposite emotional valence, as the moment in “The Wizard of Oz” when Dorothy’s world goes from black and white to color. There, it means the coming of magic; here, it means an entry to Hell. The immediacy and sudden contemporaneity of the film makes one feel the inferno of the Western Front as one never quite has before. Mud and rats, sandbags and trenches, sniper fire and mortar attacks—all of these things that we’re accustomed to experiencing abstractly through a distancing veil of archaisms and antiquity are suddenly real before us. Even as many shots effectively introduce camera movement, so that the cameraman seems to have a light, modern Sony on his shoulder, we see, or think that we’re seeing, the war for the first time, as the poor soldiers saw it. (In those places where no footage was taken or survives—that is, exactly in pitched battle—Jackson uses, less effectively, illustrations from wartime magazines, which show just how rhetorical and stereotyped even documentary-minded drawing had to be. In place of the frightened, scuttling everymen we see in the film, the magazines show us bold British warriors, heads up and mustaches flying, annihilating the Hun.) Though the immediacy of the imagery is in itself astounding, the addition of a vocal track only adds to the effect. For one unforgettable moment, the fruit of insanely obsessive labor, Jackson tracked down the precise words spoken by an officer to his troops just before the battle of the Somme, and so, for the first time in a hundred years, we “hear,” dubbed in, what’s being said, the officer’s lips suddenly coming to life with words long ago swallowed up in air.

The moment is unforgettable. Yet one need not be a media-studies major, or maven, to also feel, and then raise, some unsettling questions about the film’s approach and the achievement. We congratulate ourselves on the effective updating—on how we now can see the war as it was seen by those who fought it. But no truth is truer than how the look or sound of what seems eerily convincing changes radically as technologies change. As I once wrote for the magazine, a famous and apparently accurate story has it that a scratchy first-generation Victrola of a soprano singing, placed behind a curtain, was accepted by a circa-1900 audience as absolute fidelity. We adjust to the technology of our time as much as it adjusts to us.
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
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