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Lola_Getz
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#26

Post by Lola_Getz » Thu Jun 23, 2011 6:15 am

I had ribs at another place and they served Cole slaw and cooked red cabbage as the sides.A close friend married a girl from Warsaw. From what I can tell over the years, she serves red cabbage at damn near every meal. I half expect to see it at breakfast when we visit. Good thing I like cabbage.Are you sure that was red cabbage and not one loaf of it with a lot of red beet (burak)?She cooks both. I like beets too, so I'm happy to roll with it.On the good side, in Belgium red beet juice was recently scientifically proven to be the best drink for ... cyclists.I drink a lot of beet juice. I actually buy it by the case (12 x 1litre bottles). I've read that beet juice is a good "organ purifier," which may or may not be true, but I like the way it tastes. It's robust and earthy and just tastes like it's good for you.I know what you mean about stains though. Spill some of that stuff on your clothes and you might as well go ahead and dye the entire garment that color because the detergent hasn't been invented yet that will get those stains out.



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TollandRCR
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#27

Post by TollandRCR » Thu Jun 23, 2011 9:23 am

...I know what you mean about stains though. Spill some of that stuff on your clothes and you might as well go ahead and dye the entire garment that color because the detergent hasn't been invented yet that will get those stains out.Detergents with added stain removers come last. Act immediately. First, flood the stain with COLD water. Make sure any solid pieces are flushed away. Flood well. Then soak a piece of bread in COLD water (some use cold milk) and press it onto the stain (don't rub). It will absorb a great deal of the remaining stain. Repeat until the bread soaks nothing up. (Don't let the bread stain another garment, carpeting, or cat.) A spongy soft bread with little character works best.From here on, the usual aggressive stain removal techniques should be applied, starting with application of a bleach for colored garments in which the stain soaks for a while. Then on to the stain removal sprays or sticks and a good detergent. Enzymes in the detergent seem to be helpful. I've successfully used the Amway powder products. A couple of cycles may be needed. Don't add other garments; the beet stain will be spread throughout the wash water.This works for a number of other stains. For blood, use milk instead of water at all pre-wash stages.There was once a newspaper advice columnist, [link]Heloise,http://www.heloise.com/[/link]. I think that I picked this up from her.Alternatively, you can cut or burn a hole in the garment and then declare it to be the latest trend in punk fashion.


“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

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Dr. Kenneth Noisewater
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#28

Post by Dr. Kenneth Noisewater » Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:33 am

...I know what you mean about stains though. Spill some of that stuff on your clothes and you might as well go ahead and dye the entire garment that color because the detergent hasn't been invented yet that will get those stains out.For blood, use milk instead of water at all pre-wash stages.Yeah.... *walks away slowly*



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raicha
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#29

Post by raicha » Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:35 am

Always drink beet juice naked. No pesky stains.



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PatGund
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#30

Post by PatGund » Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:39 am

I love buffalo *strips*. Not those pesky wing things with maybe a bite or two of meat, but proper chicken breast strips in buffalo sauce.Which I'm sure marks me as some horrible heretic. But then, I also commit the cardinal sin at Rumproast of liking cilantro.



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ZekeB
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#31

Post by ZekeB » Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:42 am

Act immediately. First, flood the stain with COLD water. Make sure any solid pieces are flushed away. Flood well. Then soak a piece of bread in COLD water (some use cold milk) and press it onto the stain (don't rub). It will absorb a great deal of the remaining stain. Repeat until the bread soaks nothing up. (Don't let the bread stain another garment, carpeting, or cat.) A spongy soft bread with little character works best.Do NOT use cold water. That is a myth. Yes, hot water tends to set proteins, but cold isn't the best choice either. Think 98.6 - 37C for those like Lola who have become Europeanised :) - the body temperature. This is the ideal temperature for removing blood.In one of my past lives I was a Certified Laundry Manager at a hospital. I speak from the knowledge of hours of tedious classroom work.


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gimmeabreak
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#32

Post by gimmeabreak » Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:44 am

I love buffalo *strips*. Not those pesky wing things with maybe a bite or two of meat, but proper chicken breast strips in buffalo sauce.Which I'm sure marks me as some horrible heretic. But then, I also commit the cardinal sin at Rumproast of liking cilantro.You are forgiven your heresy on the strips because you are one of my few cilantro supporters.



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listeme
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#33

Post by listeme » Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:46 am

I love buffalo *strips*. Not those pesky wing things with maybe a bite or two of meat, but proper chicken breast strips in buffalo sauce.Which I'm sure marks me as some horrible heretic. But then, I also commit the cardinal sin at Rumproast of liking cilantro.You are forgiven your heresy on the strips because you are one of my few cilantro supporters.Cilantro is of the devil. It is like chewing soap leaves.And, anagrammatically, cilantro anagrams to contrail, which is only one step away from chemtrail, and look where THAT leads.Just avoid the whole cilantro fiasco, that's my motto.


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verbalobe
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#34

Post by verbalobe » Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:50 am

I love buffalo *strips*. Not those pesky wing things with maybe a bite or two of meat, but proper chicken breast strips in buffalo sauce.Which I'm sure marks me as some horrible heretic. But then, I also commit the cardinal sin at Rumproast of liking cilantro.You are forgiven your heresy on the strips because you are one of my few cilantro supporters.Cilantro is of the devil. It is like chewing soap leaves.And, anagrammatically, cilantro anagrams to contrail, which is only one step away from chemtrail, and look where THAT leads.Just avoid the whole cilantro fiasco, that's my motto.You may have something. Fiasco anagrams to fascio (an organized political group). So cilantro fiasco = contrail fascio. Spooky!



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#35

Post by ducktape » Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:58 am

I love buffalo *strips*. Not those pesky wing things with maybe a bite or two of meat, but proper chicken breast strips in buffalo sauce.Which I'm sure marks me as some horrible heretic. But then, I also commit the cardinal sin at Rumproast of liking cilantro.You are forgiven your heresy on the strips because you are one of my few cilantro supporters.MMMMMmmmmmmmmCilantro! :xo :xo I think it's like licorice, in that you love it or you hate it from the get-go, there's very little in between, and it's not a trainable or persuadable thing.But I could be wrong, lol. It happened once.



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#36

Post by BFB » Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:59 am

I love buffalo *strips*. Not those pesky wing things with maybe a bite or two of meat, but proper chicken breast strips in buffalo sauce.Which I'm sure marks me as some horrible heretic. But then, I also commit the cardinal sin at Rumproast of liking cilantro.Those are called "chicken fingers."But chickens ain't got no fingers!



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Foggy
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#37

Post by Foggy » Thu Jun 23, 2011 12:26 pm

Roosters are fully able to use a computer keyboard, tho ...


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A Legal Lohengrin
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#38

Post by A Legal Lohengrin » Thu Jun 23, 2011 8:01 pm

Cilantro is of the devil. It is like chewing soap leaves.Funny, it used to taste like that to me as a child, but as I grew older, that went away.



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June bug
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#39

Post by June bug » Thu Jun 23, 2011 8:12 pm

Cilantro is of the devil. It is like chewing soap leaves.Funny, it used to taste like that to me as a child, but as I grew older, that went away.I used to have that exact take on it too, listeme. I'd say then that cilantro tasted like someone had left dish soap on the plate. But, like Loh, my taste buds must have changed. First I found I didn't mind it in Mexican dishes - now I like it in Asian food too - especially Thai. [/threadjack]



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#40

Post by A Legal Lohengrin » Thu Jun 23, 2011 8:20 pm

I used to have that exact take on it too, listeme. I'd say then that cilantro tasted like someone had left dish soap on the plate. But, like Loh, my taste buds must have changed. First I found I didn't mind it in Mexican dishes - now I like it in Asian food too - especially Thai. [/threadjack]I like it particularly in Thai. I love the spice combos in Thai food: much more subtle and piquant than Chinese, or what passes for Chinese in a mediocre "American" Chinese restaurant which, like American pizza, is more of an American food than Chinese food.



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Whatever4
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#41

Post by Whatever4 » Thu Jun 23, 2011 8:43 pm

Cilantro is of the devil. It is like chewing soap leaves.Funny, it used to taste like that to me as a child, but as I grew older, that went away.My theory on that ist that Loh got used to having his mouth washed out with soap as a kid and learned to love the taste. :mrgreen:


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DaveMuckey
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#42

Post by DaveMuckey » Thu Jun 23, 2011 9:18 pm

I eat both cilantro and thinly shredded cabbage on my tacos. It's not so unusual to find shredded cabbage used at a Taqueria. When cilantro grows up, it becomes coriander.



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#43

Post by Somerset » Thu Jun 23, 2011 9:33 pm

I used to have that exact take on it too, listeme. I'd say then that cilantro tasted like someone had left dish soap on the plate. But, like Loh, my taste buds must have changed. First I found I didn't mind it in Mexican dishes - now I like it in Asian food too - especially Thai. [/threadjack]I like it particularly in Thai. I love the spice combos in Thai food: much more subtle and piquant than Chinese, or what passes for Chinese in a mediocre "American" Chinese restaurant which, like American pizza, is more of an American food than Chinese food.Subtle is not a word I would to describe Thai cuisine :)



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#44

Post by A Legal Lohengrin » Thu Jun 23, 2011 10:05 pm

I used to have that exact take on it too, listeme. I'd say then that cilantro tasted like someone had left dish soap on the plate. But, like Loh, my taste buds must have changed. First I found I didn't mind it in Mexican dishes - now I like it in Asian food too - especially Thai. [/threadjack]I like it particularly in Thai. I love the spice combos in Thai food: much more subtle and piquant than Chinese, or what passes for Chinese in a mediocre "American" Chinese restaurant which, like American pizza, is more of an American food than Chinese food.Subtle is not a word I would to describe Thai cuisine :)I disagree on that, well, except for their green curries, which are a punch in the face. Even those have interesting undertones, though.



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#45

Post by Somerset » Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:30 pm

I used to have that exact take on it too, listeme. I'd say then that cilantro tasted like someone had left dish soap on the plate. But, like Loh, my taste buds must have changed. First I found I didn't mind it in Mexican dishes - now I like it in Asian food too - especially Thai. [/threadjack]I like it particularly in Thai. I love the spice combos in Thai food: much more subtle and piquant than Chinese, or what passes for Chinese in a mediocre "American" Chinese restaurant which, like American pizza, is more of an American food than Chinese food.Subtle is not a word I would to describe Thai cuisine :)I disagree on that, well, except for their green curries, which are a punch in the face. Even those have interesting undertones, though.[serious threadjack]Complex, definitely. But Thai food in general is pretty assertive. And I should hasten to add that I'm in complete agreement with you about loving Thai food. I eat enough of it in a couple of Thai restaurants here that I should probably invest in them. I'm their "pet falang" who eats just about everything they eat (although I had to draw the line at the fried termites my friend brought back from Issan). Here's an example. This is nam prik ga bpi, a shrimp paste "relish" that's as common on Thai tables as ketchup is on American tables (and gets made in the Somerset household every few days):4 garlic cloves, peeledpinch of kosher salt1 tablespoon shrimp paste~4 mouse dropping chilis1~3 teaspoons palm sugar1 tablespoon lime juice, or to tastefish sauce, if neededUsing a mortar and pestle, pound garlic and salt into a smooth paste, then add shrimp paste. Add chilies, pounding a little for a litte heat, and into a paste to release more heat. Finish with palm sugar and lime juice to taste, and add some fish sauce if the saltiness balance is off. The relish should be a balance of salt, heat and sour, with the sugar adding richnessThis is a very common condiment in Thailand, but I've never seen it served in a US restaurant (unless you ask for it). Even if you keep the heat toned down, the combination of raw garlic and shrimp paste is pretty assertive. From my experience, this is fairly typical of Thai cuisine. Not everything is blazing hot, but the flavors are usually pretty "up front."



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TollandRCR
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#46

Post by TollandRCR » Fri Jun 24, 2011 10:35 am

...I love Frank's Red Hot sauce. When the supermarket in my small English town finally started stocking it about a year ago, I actually asked them if I could buy it by the case just so I'd have some stockpiled in the event they decided to stop selling it. There's not much I don't like it with. Ice cream, maybe, but I'm sure I could figure out a way to make it work.Absolutely it could work. If there is ginger ice cream and garlic ice cream, there surely can be jalapeño ice cream and [link]jalapeño avocado ice cream,http://realtexasblog.com/2010/05/17/rea ... ice-cream/[/link]. Probably not haberno ice cream. My maternal grandmother, who was from New Iberia, LA, would make a meal of "sweet milk" with Tabasco sauce and cornbread crumbled into it. Tabasco used to be produced only from peppers grown on [link]Avery Island,http://www.tabasco.com/tabasco_history/avery_island.cfm[/link], a salt dome island outside New Iberia. It is made from a pepper that uniquely retains its juiciness, Capsicum frutescens var. tabasco, not from jalapeños. I think that other sources had to be used when the Avery Island peppers got the tobacco mosaic virus. She had died when that occurred, so she had little to say about whether this made a difference in the flavor.Unfortunately, she also loved brains and eggs. The rest of us had to leave the house when she made that. Those Creole folk can have funny tastes.


“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

gentrfam
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#47

Post by gentrfam » Fri Jun 24, 2011 10:54 am

Funny article in [link]Slate,http://www.slate.com/id/2297106/[/link] yesterday. "Hmmm," she said cautiously, "this violates my old home-ec teacher's rule: Never cook anything with more than one column of ingredients."[link]Here's the recipe in question,http://events.nytimes.com/recipes/7401/ ... ecipe.html[/link]I've figured out what a channel knife is (maybe) and I think I know the purpose of scoring the carrots lengthwise with the channel knife before cutting very thin slices (make them look pretty) but how does one fry celery leaves until they're crisp?



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#48

Post by ducktape » Fri Jun 24, 2011 11:04 am

Absolutely it could work. If there is ginger ice cream and garlic ice cream, there surely can be jalapeño ice cream and [link]jalapeño avocado ice cream,http://realtexasblog.com/2010/05/17/rea ... ice-cream/[/link]. Probably not haberno ice cream.I made avocado & jalapeño ice cream last summer, as part of my exploration into what sort of interesting freezes, ice creams and sorbets could be derived from what I was getting as free "eat me now" fruits in the market.While it didn't work very well as a standalone ice cream, it is marvelous when a scoop is dropped into a bowl of gazpacho. The heirloom tomato season is just coming in here, and I had my first this week, so I see more avocado & jalapeño ice cream coming.I'm also thinking of a cucumber/jalapeño sorbet, sort of a riff on those fresh pickles that come with pad thai.



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ZekeB
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#49

Post by ZekeB » Fri Jun 24, 2011 11:28 am

So how did the topic title get changed? Bad Hostigator!


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Somerset
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#50

Post by Somerset » Fri Jun 24, 2011 7:33 pm

So how did the topic title get changed? Bad Hostigator!Foggy hadz a mad at some of us. We said we wuz sorry and we promised not dirty up the sittin' room no more with none of our cookin' stuff.



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