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Plutodog
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#101

Post by Plutodog » Sun Jul 24, 2011 1:28 pm

That was good until the end...especially the very end. Roast Rooster (that's manok in the Philippines) is starting to sound very good to me. :twisted: http://images01.olx.com.ph/ui/10/34/81/ ... 338043.jpg


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#102

Post by listeme » Sun Jul 24, 2011 1:29 pm

I have a great recipe that I use when I feed my cat the raw diet.
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#103

Post by Litlebritdifrnt2 » Sun Jul 24, 2011 7:44 pm

Figs.My earliest experience of fresh figs is when I used to visit Morocco from Gibraltar when the border between Gib and Spain was still closed. Fresh fruit and veg in Gib was very thin on the ground but when we went on the Ferry over to Morocco we could buy bag loads. I remember seeing the piles of fresh figs at the fruit and veg markets and tasting one, offered to me by the vendor. What an explosion of flavor, sweet, ripe and with an almost distinct flavor of creamy English toffee. I was hooked!Today I went to Fresh Market (my monthly pilgrimage) and they had fresh California figs in containers. They were dark plum colored and looked for all the world like those lucious figs from Morocco. I bought a package and when I got home I eagerly opened the container and sunk my teeth into the ripe fig. To be honest with you it tasted like I was eating a scrunched up paper towel. It was dry, it was completely and utterly tasteless. How do they manage that? How do they manage to create a completely and utterly inedible version of a simply wonderful fruit? Do they inbreed varieties? Do they cross breed the most wonderful parts of the fruit out of its existence? How the hell do they manage to make a fruit inedible? WTF?



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#104

Post by A Legal Lohengrin » Sun Jul 24, 2011 8:00 pm

Today I went to Fresh Market (my monthly pilgrimage) and they had fresh California figs in containers. They were dark plum colored and looked for all the world like those lucious figs from Morocco. I bought a package and when I got home I eagerly opened the container and sunk my teeth into the ripe fig. To be honest with you it tasted like I was eating a scrunched up paper towel. It was dry, it was completely and utterly tasteless. How do they manage that? How do they manage to create a completely and utterly inedible version of a simply wonderful fruit? Do they inbreed varieties? Do they cross breed the most wonderful parts of the fruit out of its existence? How the hell do they manage to make a fruit inedible? WTF?This is, tragically, an American specialty. The American produce industry now specializes in creating lovely looking fruits and vegetables that, for all their taste, may as well be made of wax. A prime example would be the repulsive bright red "tomatoes" often sold in supermarkets, that are artificially made bright red by spraying them with ethylene. This is just one example of the pathetic scams pulled on Americans every day of our lives. You have to get imported tomatoes to get a real tomato these days, or buy locally, or actually pick them in your own garden (there is no better tomato than one still warm from the sun in your own backyard). For the imported tomatoes, I absolutely love Israeli tomatoes, but I haven't been able to get those since I lived down the block from Balducci's (before they shut the one in the Village down).In any event, American fruit and vegetables from corporate outlets is ghastly. It looks wonderful, and is actually barely food. At the same time, we vastly subsidize high-fructose corn syrup, so soda is very cheap, and most things sold as "fruit juice" are "juice drinks" and other garbage that has at most 10% fruit juice and is actually about as good for you as soda. We also subsidize the synthetic garbage that goes into things like Twinkies and pretty much anything in the middle aisles of a grocery store.It's outrageous that we literally subsidize our own death at the hands of the food industry octopus, while actually discouraging the growing of healthy foods.The despicable and degraded omnibus so-called "Farm Bill" that Congress passes every five years is literally subsidizing the deaths of tens of thousands of Americans every year, and essentially at this point exists to finance the corn industry, via companies like ConAgra, Pioneer, Archer-Daniels-Midland, and Monsanto.Lest this post sound a bit hysterical, I will mince no words. My use of the phrase "tens of thousands" is quite considered, and based in solid fact. [/break1]nytimes.com/2007/04/22/magazine/22wwlnlede.t.html?ref=farmbillus]This isn't the best article I've read on the subject, but it cuts to the case. The Farm Bill is making America fatter, sicker and poorer. It is the most expensive boondoggle that you never hear about.Anyway, I can't see if I'm in a jackable thread, and don't really care. I just haz a mad at these useless wax replicas sold as produce by corporate America, and don't like being swindled into buying something that looks like a tomato, usually at an inflated price, that instead is actually tasteless pulp. There are reasons for this, and none of them are good.



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Sequoia32
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#105

Post by Sequoia32 » Sun Jul 24, 2011 8:14 pm

Britty, the tasty ones would never make it across the country. Fruits and veg are bred to look good and survive shipping still looking good.We had a young lady from Australia stay with us a few years ago. She was amazed at the huge variety of produce in the stores but appalled at the lack of flavor.Fortunately, more Americans are getting interested in where their food comes from and gardening is coming back in style.Can you grow a fig tree there?


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#106

Post by ducktape » Sun Jul 24, 2011 9:08 pm

Can you grow a fig tree there?Indeed, unless the climate has changed markedly since I lived in eastern NC, you can grow fig trees there. They're almost "trash trees" -- the kind that will take over where other trees have been, so if you get the chance and have a sunny spot, put some in.Be careful which kind you get, though. I remember. I've had figs out here in CA that were almost tasteless, and some that were absolute explosions of flavor that make fabulous fig-ginger ice cream But the latter have all been the "eat me now" figs that I get at the farmers' market. I like the black figs for eating -- the green ones get put into jam.I don't think then really ripen any more once they're off the tree and they also don't transport well when they're ripe, so if they're shipped to NC from CA, I think they're going to be pretty tasteless. But maybe you can find some local figs.



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#107

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Sun Jul 24, 2011 9:48 pm

Can you grow a fig tree there?Indeed, unless the climate has changed markedly since I lived in eastern NC, you can grow fig trees there. They're almost "trash trees" -- the kind that will take over where other trees have been, so if you get the chance and have a sunny spot, put some in.Be careful which kind you get, though. I remember. I've had figs out here in CA that were almost tasteless, and some that were absolute explosions of flavor that make fabulous fig-ginger ice cream But the latter have all been the "eat me now" figs that I get at the farmers' market. I like the black figs for eating -- the green ones get put into jam.I don't think then really ripen any more once they're off the tree and they also don't transport well when they're ripe, so if they're shipped to NC from CA, I think they're going to be pretty tasteless. But maybe you can find some local figs.Ducky -- don't tell me -- you were once a fig farmer, too?



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#108

Post by Princess foofypants » Sun Jul 24, 2011 11:01 pm

This year I joined a farm cooperative to try and support local agriculture. Loving it but yesterday's take included 2 kohlrabi bulbs. Anyone have a clue what to do with them?I can figure out the corn and peppers.



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#109

Post by ducktape » Sun Jul 24, 2011 11:59 pm

This year I joined a farm cooperative to try and support local agriculture. Loving it but yesterday's take included 2 kohlrabi bulbs. Anyone have a clue what to do with them?I can figure out the corn and peppers.Treat them link broccoli stems. They're a member of the cabbage family.When I get a new veggie, my rule of thumb is "when in doubt, roast."Heat the over to 375, slice the veggie into 1/4-inch slices and toss with a bit of olive oil. Spread slices on a sheet pan in an even layer, and roast for 15 min ... you should be getting some bits of nice brown maillard color on the sides touching the pan. Turn slices over, shake on some freshly-grated (or shredded) parmesan cheese, some garlic powder, or any other seasoning you like (yum - broken pecans) except NOT salt (put it on after the veggies are finished so that they don't get soggy from it). Continue roasting another 10 to 15 min. Serve and accept kudoes.Very easy, and works with about anything dense. Parnips, carrots, celery root, sweet potators & yams, sunchokes, etc. Also is fabulous with cauliflower; with beets, leave off the parmesan and serve with a couple of splashes of balsamic vinegar.



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#110

Post by A Legal Lohengrin » Mon Jul 25, 2011 12:35 am

This year I joined a farm cooperative to try and support local agriculture. Loving it but yesterday's take included 2 kohlrabi bulbs. Anyone have a clue what to do with them?





I can figure out the corn and peppers.Treat them link broccoli stems. They're a member of the cabbage family.





When I get a new veggie, my rule of thumb is "when in doubt, roast."Personally, I'm more "when in doubt, eat it raw!" I don't think kohlrabi goes that way, though. For that, I would go with your roast option.





Interestingly, kohlrabi is not merely in the cabbage "family." It's the same species. An astonishing number of plants we eat, and generally think of as being different plants, are the same exact species, Brassica oleracea. Broccoli, cauliflower, "Roman" cauliflower, kohlrabi, kale, brussels sprouts, collard greens, and many other crops humans eat all are cultivars of that same species. Rutabagas, turnips, and mustard are also part of the same genus, but not the same species.





They can all generally be eaten raw, and so, supposedly, can kohlrabi, though I'd be hesitant to try that out.



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#111

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Mon Jul 25, 2011 12:39 am

As for same species (and food in some parts of the world) you can include grasshoppers and locusts.



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#112

Post by A Legal Lohengrin » Mon Jul 25, 2011 12:41 am

As for same species (and food in some parts of the world) you can include grasshoppers and locusts.Locusts are unique among the insects in sometimes being kosher. I don't think anyone seems terribly certain which locusts actually are kosher, though.



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#113

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Mon Jul 25, 2011 12:42 am

I know when they are trafe.Sekrit Stuffs!
When they are fried in bacon fat.



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#114

Post by A Legal Lohengrin » Mon Jul 25, 2011 12:44 am

I know when they are trafe.Sekrit Stuffs!
When they are fried in bacon fat.
Sekrit Stuffs!
You could say the same of matzoh balls, though.



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#115

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Mon Jul 25, 2011 12:45 am

I know when they are trafe.Sekrit Stuffs!
When they are fried in bacon fat.
Sekrit Stuffs!
You could say the same of matzoh balls, though.
I prefer the female matzohs.



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#116

Post by TollandRCR » Mon Jul 25, 2011 1:13 am

Can you grow a fig tree there?Indeed, unless the climate has changed markedly since I lived in eastern NC, you can grow fig trees there. o if ...They will grow in northern Virginia, too. Also. Of course, gardening is a defensive art in a northern Virginia summer. I could tell you stories about the pumpkin that ate the backyard....


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#117

Post by Estiveo » Mon Jul 25, 2011 2:45 am

So, I've been playing with "Deconstructing," which, for the uninitiated, is sort of breaking down and re-imagining standard fare or comfort food, then rebuilding it into something new...and sometimes healthier. The best part, though, given the discussion above, is that, tonight, I used Matzo Meal as an ingredient. (I love Matzo Ball Soup...hence I have Matzo meal on hand)





One of my fave-rave soups when I was a kid was Chicken & Mushroom Soup. It was sort of cream of mushroom meets chicken noodle without the noodles. Served with a grilled cheese sammich it was haute cuisine for the kiddie set back in the 60's. (yeah, you heard me...the 60's.)





Tonight I deconstructed that into what I'm gonna call:





Six Mushroom Soup with Turkey Meatballs Served Over Rice


(Please note that measures will be non-existant; I just throw stuff in until it's right)





MEATBALLS:


1 lb (+/-) Ground Turkey (97/3)


2 eggs


splash of beer (optional)


several dashes of Tapatío (or whatever hot sauce you like)


herbs/spices (I used oregano, basil, thyme, garlic powder, hot paprika, roasted coriander, kosher salt & coarse black pepper)


Bread crumbs


Matzo meal





Mix the above except for the bread crumbs & matzo meal until blended and soupy. Mix in bread crumbs until the mixture is about half way to being thick enough to roll into meatballs then add the matzo meal until it’s just right. Chill for an hour or two while you build the soup. Roll into +/- 1 inch meatballs and stage on waxed paper or alu-bloody-minium foil. Drop into the soup as indicated below.





SOUP:


Butter


Olive oil


Some form of onion (I used Leeks)


Mushrooms (I used fresh White, Brown (crimini) and Shitake mushrooms, with dried Porcini & Woodear and canned Straw mushrooms, but use whatever you can get, the more the merrier)





**please note: rehydrate the dried mushrooms as indicated but SAVE THE LIQUID!!**





Herbs & spices (I used dried oregano, basil, garlic powder, thyme, roasted (ground) cumin, kosher salt, black pepper and some Ottoman Spice that my Bro & Barbara-in-law brought home from the spice market in Istanbul. (use chili flakes and paprika as a sub, or just taste as you go and figure it out))


1 big container of low sodium Chicken broth


1 standard container of no sodium Vegetable broth.





Melt the butter with the Olive oil, bring to high heat & throw in the leeks, stir for a minute or so then toss in the ‘shrooms and all the herbs and spices. Stir until well mixed. If carmelization occurs? Lucky you, keep going.





Once everything has started to cook a bit, stir in the chicken broth and vegetable broth. Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer and, slowly, drop in the meatballs. Drop some, stir gently, drop some more, repeat until all the meatballs are in the soup.





NOTE this is where you add in the reserved mushroom liquid if you need to add some volume. Knock yourself out, it’s flavor that you’re adding!





Cover and put on a low simmer for about an hour, stirring from time to time.





Meanwhile: cook some rice. (I cooked mine with some tomatos, sesame oil and saffron) Put a good sized scoop o’ rice in the middle of a soup bowl. Arrange 3 or 4 of the meatballs around the rice. Spoon the soup over the rice & meatballs.





Yeah, it was pretty good. 8-)


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#118

Post by Global Village Idiot » Mon Jul 25, 2011 6:24 pm

I know when they are trafe.Sekrit Stuffs!
When they are fried in bacon fat.
Sekrit Stuffs!
You could say the same of matzoh balls, though.
I prefer the female matzohs.I've always wondered (being a recovering catholic); what do they do with the rest of the matzoh once the balls are removed?



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#119

Post by P.K. » Sun Jul 31, 2011 4:42 pm

Can you grow a fig tree there?Indeed, unless the climate has changed markedly since I lived in eastern NC, you can grow fig trees there. o if ...They will grow in northern Virginia, too. Also. Of course, gardening is a defensive art in a northern Virginia summer. I could tell you stories about the pumpkin that ate the backyard....I have a decades-old fig tree in my backyard, which produces lovely, sweet, delicious figs. And I never get any of them because the damn squirrels eat them all before I get a chance to pick them! ! I've lived in this house nine years now and have never gotten enough figs at one time to make jam. Little rotten bastards......


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#120

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Sun Jul 31, 2011 4:46 pm

You need a good tree climbing cat.



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#121

Post by Whatever4 » Mon Aug 01, 2011 1:52 am

You need a good tree climbing cat.Stern is recommending getting a cat? Who are you, and what have you done with the real Sterngard Friegen??


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#122

Post by majorbabs » Mon Aug 01, 2011 2:45 pm

You need a good tree climbing cat.Stern is recommending getting a cat? Who are you, and what have you done with the real Sterngard Friegen??I think it's just a case where Stern hates squirrels much, much more than cats. Or maybe he's just hoping that the squirrel will eat the cat? :D



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#123

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Mon Aug 01, 2011 2:49 pm

My squirrels produce their own rattlesnake antivenin.



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Princess foofypants
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#124

Post by Princess foofypants » Mon Aug 01, 2011 11:05 pm

I give up. Tonight, even with a recipe I managed to fuck up the one thing I was allowed to have for dinner.Sekrit Stuffs!
jello
:oops:



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#125

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Mon Aug 01, 2011 11:08 pm

Hint: You have to refrigerate it.



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