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ZekeB
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#1476

Post by ZekeB »

I only eat Spam with a helping of Monty Python. For those who have ever driven across southern Minnesota on I-90, the Spam museum is at Austin, MN. Volkonski's ads are as much meat advertisements as dairy advertisements. Kosher they ain't, but there were no Jews in the 1950's, yes?
Trump: Er hat eine größere Ente als ich.

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Volkonski
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#1477

Post by Volkonski »



Volkonski, I have to chuckle every time you post one of those mid-20th century cooking booklets or ads. So often, I see the recipes that my mother (who, trust me, cannot cook, but can/could put together a Spam Peach Bake or a Wrangler's Frank Bake with the best of them) must have followed. Lordy, it's amazing to me that we kids lived to adulthood...credit my father and stepfather, both of whom were--at the base of their souls--farmers, and both of whom made sure there were plenty of fresh fruits and veggies on the table. :mrgreen:





So your mother used to make those dishes? There is a website for people like you-

Hey, My Mom Used to Make That!

http://pzrservices.typepad.com/vintager ... index.html



There is a companion website-

Found in Mom's Basement

http://pzrservices.typepad.com/vintageadvertising/



From that site, a 1964 ad-





Yes, we had Betty White back then too.
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

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SueDB
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#1478

Post by SueDB »

From that site- http://img0.etsystat...N.271150264.jpg



Gawd I love Betty White! :lol:
“If You're Not In The Obit, Eat Breakfast”

Remember, Orly NEVAH disappoints!

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Family Liberty Patriot
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#1479

Post by Family Liberty Patriot »

My old man was a camera operator on her TV show in the 50s; apparently, she was universally loved, and he adored her until the day he died.
"The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness."

John Kenneth Galbraith (1908 - 2006)

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Volkonski
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#1480

Post by Volkonski »



My old man was a camera operator on her TV show in the 50s; apparently, she was universally loved, and he adored her until the day he died.





This show?




Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

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Family Liberty Patriot
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#1481

Post by Family Liberty Patriot »

Indeed. For all we know, my dad shot that.
"The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness."

John Kenneth Galbraith (1908 - 2006)

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Paul Lentz
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#1482

Post by Paul Lentz »

Indeed. For all we know, my dad shot that.



Credits on that are at 25:30...you may want to check it out.



I'd never heard of "Date With the Angels" before, and apparently Betty White had another show called "Life With Elizabeth" (also news to me).
The love of power will not win over the power of love.
Orlando, Florida 6/12/16

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Sequoia32
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#1483

Post by Sequoia32 »

The neighbor brought over some really good cookies she had baked. She included the recipe which looks like it originated at Sunset Magazine Test Kitchens (for Challenge Dairy). They are really yummy! Coconut-Cranberry Chews1½ cups Butter, at room temperature (3/4 lb.)2 cups sugar1 Tablespoon grated orange peel2 teaspoons vanilla1 large egg3¼ cups all-purpose flour1 teaspoon baking powder¼ teaspoon salt1½ cups dried cranberries1½ cups sweetened flaked dried coconutIn a large bowl, with a mixer on medium speed, beat 1½ cups butter, sugar, orange peel, and vanilla until smooth. Beat in egg, until well blended.In a medium bowl, mix flour, baking powder, and salt. Add to butter mixture, stir to mix, then beat on low speed until dough comes together, about 5 minutes (see notes). Mix in cranberries and coconut. Note: The mixture may look dry until it comes together as a dough. If its too crumbly to form into balls, the dough need to be mixed longer; it should be a smooth homogeneous mass.Shape dough into 1-inch balls and place about 2 inches apart on buttered 12" x 15" baking sheets.Bake in a 350°F regular or convection oven until cookie edges just begin to brown, 11 to 15 minutes (shorter baking time will yield a chewier cookie; longer baking time will yield a crispier cookie). If baking two sheets at once in one oven, switch their positions halfway through baking. Let cookies cool on sheets for 5 minutes, then use a wide spatula to transfer to racks to cool completely.
So far every case of Ebola in this country got it by helping people. So relax, Republicans, you're in the clear. - Tina Dupuy

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Volkonski
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#1484

Post by Volkonski »

Well, just in time for winter here is my Potato and Leek Soup recipe. This soup is rich and delicious on a cold winter's day. The recipe is easy but it does take some time. When on the North Fork in the fall we make this with mostly local ingredients (excepting the chicken stock and Worcester sauce).



5 medium or 3 large potatoes, russets work well but others can be used.



4 leeks



1/2 large onion or 1 small onion, chopped



4 tablespoons butter



32 oz no salt added chicken stock



1 pint half and half or cream



1/4 cup dry sherry or cooking sherry



1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley



3 gloves garlic, pealed and chopped or pressed



Several dashes of Worcester sauce



salt and pepper



Preparation-



Scrub the potatoes (do not peel) and cut into 1/2 inch cubes.



Slice the white part of the leeks into ~ 1/8 inch slices.



(It is my custom, after the knife work is done, to pour a nice glass of pinot noir into the cook. ;))



In a large pot, melt the butter and saute the onion and leeks until they are a bit tender.



Add the chicken stock and potatoes, cover the pot and bring to a boil then reduce the heat and boil slowly for about 20 to 25 minutes until the potatoes are tender.



Uncover, reduce the heat and stir in the half and half, garlic, Worcester sauce and sherry.



Simmer without boiling for about 15 to 20 minutes which will slightly thicken the soup, stir occasionally.



Add the parsley, stir and serve.



Salt and pepper to taste



I like to serve this with crusty french bread, butter and a selection of cheeses. (Mrs. V. would also add a side salad.)



This soup freezes well and can be kept for months.
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

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Volkonski
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#1485

Post by Volkonski »

1½ cups dried cranberries



Hard to go wrong with cranberries! :D
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

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Volkonski
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#1486

Post by Volkonski »

This recipe arrived in my inbox this morning and it looked so good I thought I would link to it.



http://www.riverheadlocal.com/2014/12/2 ... arty/Roast the perfect rack of lamb for your holiday dinner party


Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

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Plutodog
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#1487

Post by Plutodog »

That link didn't work for me. How 'bout this one?



http://www.riverheadlocal.com/2014/12/2 ... ner-party/
The only good Bundy is an Al Bundy.

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Volkonski
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#1488

Post by Volkonski »





That link didn't work for me. How 'bout this one?



http://www.riverheadlocal.com/2014/12/2 ... ner-party/





Thanks, don't what went wrong with the link.
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

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Paul Lentz
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#1489

Post by Paul Lentz »

Ahh, New Year's Day! There are 4 holidays each year (New Year's, Easter, Thanksgiving and Christmas...and maybe St. Patrick's Day) when we tend to fix fairly traditional meals, or at least feel some pressure to conform to traditions. And while we have, over the years, made some departures (wide and narrow) from the "traditional" of Easter, Thanksgiving and Christmas, for my family, New Year's Day continues to be the same meal that both my parents and CB's parents always served on the 1st day of the New Year...indeed, when we were growing up here in Orlando, you could safely put money down that if you went to 5 houses on the same block in either direction, you'd find that the very same meal was being served in all of them.



For many southerners, the traditional New Year's meal includes Hoppin' John (black-eyed peas, chopped bacon or ham, chopped onions, either served over or incorporating rice; greens; cornbread). Now, of course, there are some variations in the basic ingredients (for example, my Georgia relatives used field peas instead of black-eyed peas, and usually ate turnip greens instead of the collard greens used by my family and CB's here in Central Florida). And, like a pecan pie recipe which varies from cook to cook and region to region, the recipe used for the Hoppin' John might well vary from cook to cook.



I never realized until we lived in Pennsylvania briefly that Hoppin' John/greens/cornbread weren't the traditional New Year's dinner for everyone, everywhere across the U.S. This was brought to our attention just preceding our first New Year's there, when CB went to the little grocery store in town, and could not find black-eyed peas--not frozen, not dried, not canned. And--I suppose not too surprisingly--no collard greens (plus no mustard greens and no turnip greens). No ham hocks (a key ingredient in properly prepared greens). "No, indeed," CB was told by the grocery store manager, "You won't find those things here for New Year's, or really for most of the year, if at all. In these parts, we eat pork roast and sauerkraut on New Year's. I thought everyone did." :lol:



So, that year, we made do with our "Pennsylvania Hoppin' John" made with lentils, chopped ham, and onions; a Stouffer's spinach souffle for our "greens," and our usual cornbread; shortly thereafter, CB's mom sent us a care package of 10 bags of dried black-eyed peas and 10 bags of Dixie Lily Yellow Rice Dinner (something else we couldn't get there, and can't get here anymore). CB planted collards and mustard the following summer, and blanched and froze some of the harvest for New Year's. On a few occasions when she'd see ham hocks in the grocery store, she'd buy them and set some aside in the freezer. As it turned out, we both really liked the Stouffer's spinach souffle (but, for us at that time, it was an extravagance we couldn't really afford to repeat). Undeterred, CB searched through her old family recipes and we tried several spinach preparations over the years (souffles, casseroles, etc.) until finally settling on a Spinach Cheese casserole we all enjoy, and which is now our traditional New Year's serving of "greens" (no ham hocks required).



How about all of you? What are your New Year's traditions?
The love of power will not win over the power of love.
Orlando, Florida 6/12/16

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#1490

Post by TollandRCR »



...

How about all of you? What are your New Year's traditions?







Blackeyed "peas" on cornbread with sweet India relish and chopped onions. Also the usual three or four other vegetables for "dinner." Ham, preferably an old smoked ham. I was unpleasantly surprised to discover that vegetables were not a major part of meals outside of the South. but that may be changing. Kale seems to appear in many guises now.



My ancient aunt used to call to determine whether I had eaten my blackeyed peas as prescribed. That brings a good year, you know.
“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

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#1491

Post by Estiveo »

Great northern beans with chopped ham and plenty of onions, cornbread and I use a mix of spinach, chard and kale for the greens.
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#1492

Post by ducktape »

I made my famous "killer beans" which are usually black eyed peas, but I didn't have any in the pantry so I made them with black beans. Ham hock, onions, peppers, tomatoes, and my secret mix of goodies that make it killer. It's not traditional at all.



But I actually did it for Christmas with smoked spare ribs and collards, so when it got cold in the last few days, I took the rest of the beans, cooked up about 1-1/2 pounds of ground beef and onions and turned it into chili.

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#1493

Post by magdalen77 »

I agree with your former Pennsylvania neighbors the only appropriate meal for New Year's Day is pork roast and sauerkraut. Of course in our family we also had fresh and smoked kielbasa. But that was for every holiday dinner.

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#1494

Post by Roboe »

How about all of you? What are your New Year's traditions?

New Year's traditions around here dictated the following:



Kir Royal (Champagne and Creme de cassis) as an aperitif along with various salty snacks. To be consumed standing during the Queen's New Year speech, with toasts along the way as she sent her greetings to the usual suspects: The people of Greenland, the people of the Faroe Isles, the Danish minority in Schleswig, the "people of the sea" (ie. sailors), Danes abroad, and those whose duties requires them to be at work on New Year's Eve (police, firemen, nurses, etc.). This year she really threw a curveball, when she started out by sending a special greetings to children and teenagers.



Then we moved on to the first course, which has traditionally been raw oyster with the works, but which I've found to work much better (as in, for people who are not accustomed to the taste of raw oyster) when deepfried. Served with an oyster infused mayo and you're good to go.



Then the main course, which was beef tenderloin, but again with a minor twist. The tenderloin was cut into tournedos, bacon wrapped around the edge, and then grilled as you would a steak. Served with mornay potatoes (raw potatoes sliced and placed into a casserole with thinly sliced onions, a couple sliced leeks, a couple of thinly sliced garlic cloves, all nearly covered in mornay sauce (it'll expand to cover it all anyway), and then roasted in the oven for 45 mins or so).



Dessert was simple ice cream with warm chocolate sauce to go with it, followed by a cheese platter and coffee & tea.



Around 11.40 pm or so, everyone gathered around to watch Dinner for One, while yours truly set to work with the champagne and kransekage, which is served at midnight. Later on, around 2 am, when everything had settled down, a midnight snack was served in the form of soup and smørrebrød for those who were still in a state to ingest anything, and needed something hearty in order to make the trip home.

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#1495

Post by Foggy »

A simple smoked ham, heated up in the oven for a couple hours. Hoppin' John is a thing here, but I haven't tried making it. :oops: ?( Maybe next year. I suppose y'all know about the symbolism of luck, monetary wealth, and romance. I'm not that big into symbolism.



We had scalloped taters and fresh squash. It was a quiet New Year's. :batting:



Tonight I'll cook some of the leftover ham on skewers with chunks of pineapple, grilled and brushed with a brown sugar/olive oil/vinegar glaze.



Next week, based on some blowback I got from the boys about serving pork too often (pork is really cheap here in hog farm country), is Chicken Week.



Chicken Shawarma



Coq au Riesling



Lemon Chicken Picatta



Tuscan Garlic Chicken



Indian Butter Chicken



Sesame Chicken



Chicken Tikka Masala



Parmesan Chicken Bites





Then we'll see if they're ready for a little pork again ... :mrgreen:
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#1496

Post by SueDB »

Virginia and NC are piggie country. It was said that citizens of Virginia ate so much pork that they would rather squeal than talk.



Grandma from VA used to send out a Pruden's Ham (old style VA smokedhouse ham). Heaven on earth after you get over the salt.



When my father ate that ham, I could just see his ankles swell.



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“If You're Not In The Obit, Eat Breakfast”

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Whatever4
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#1497

Post by Whatever4 »

What's the appeal of "Dinner for One"? My german friends say it's an institution there.
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Volkonski
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#1498

Post by Volkonski »


Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

Roboe
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#1499

Post by Roboe »





What's the appeal of "Dinner for One"? My german friends say it's an institution there.







These days, it's mainly that it's a tradition :lol: It's been shown every year since 1973 and even as a kid growing up, the adults could cite most of the drunken toasts the butler makes along the way. For some reason, I keep getting "I now declare this bazaar" open stuck in my head. I suppose the drunken debauchery reminds of what New Years Eve parties eventually turn into ;)



Edit: It should be noted, just about every television set will be tuned in to a TV station that broadcasts the New Years bells from Copenhagen City Hall, and there's only two that really does it - and Dinner for One is broadcast on one of them. So people are used to filling the last few minutes by watching the show, as champagne and cake is handed out.

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Paul Lentz
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#1500

Post by Paul Lentz »

Tonight I'll cook some of the leftover ham on skewers with chunks of pineapple, grilled and brushed with a brown sugar/olive oil/vinegar glaze.



That glaze sounds good, Foggy. However, I'm stuck on another Southern traditional ham glaze: mix brown sugar and yellow mustard (about a 3:1 ratio) to a thick liquid. We use that glaze primarily for ham (which is often studded with whole cloves, or which is covered in pineapple rings and pegged in maraschino cherries). I love that glaze. I have been known to lick the bowl clean after all the glazing is done, and to pout if CB washes out the bowl before I have a chance to do so.
The love of power will not win over the power of love.
Orlando, Florida 6/12/16

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