Recipes!

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TollandRCR
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Re: Recipes!

#2651

Post by TollandRCR »

Why peel those potatoes? I know that nothing could make for a delicious creamy soup unless the potatoes are peeled, but much of the nutrition is in and nesr the skin. Creamy is less imporant.
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Volkonski
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Re: Recipes!

#2652

Post by Volkonski »

I suppose it was inevitable. Limited Edition Pumpkin Spice English Muffins made with real pumpkin.

:roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll:

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Patagoniagirl
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Re: Recipes!

#2653

Post by Patagoniagirl »

I saw an article on salted potatoes and was skeptical and intrigued. A relative of mine dug up her taters and had no use for the tiny ones (I didn't food shame her) so I gave it a whirl. THE MOST DELICIOUS TREAT! I did not do the last part of putting the taters back in the pot with butter. I simply let them rest in the colander and get a salty film. Served them with several dipping sauces. Butter and herbs, cheese sauce and a lemon dill.

So creamy and not at all too salty.

Here is the recipe:

Ingredients
2 quarts (1/2 gallon) water

1/2 pound salt

2 pounds small waxy potatoes, new potatoes, or fingerlings

6 tablespoons unsalted butter (3/4 stick)

About the potatoes. White potatoes are standard, but you can use red skinned potatoes if you wish.

About the salt. It doesn't matter if you use table salt or kosher salt since the recipe goes by weight.

Method
1) First, read my article on The Science of Potatoes.

2) Prep. Wash the potatoes thoroughly, scrubbing them with a scrubby sponge. Make sure you get all the soap out of the sponge, please. Cut out any bad spots or growing eyes, but leave the skin on and leave them whole.

3) Cook. Then bring the water to a hard boil. Add the salt and stir until dissolved. Add the taters being careful not to splash yourself. Boil until a fork slides in and out of a potato with ease, about 20-30 minutes.

4) Pour the potatoes into a strainer or colander in the sink and drain. Let them sit for a few minutes and they should get a slight frosting of salt. Put the hot pot back on the burner and turn it to medium. Add the butter and melt it. Then add the potatoes, stir to coat with butter.

5) Serve. Serve immediately, but they are potatoes, so they'll stay warm for a while.

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Sugar Magnolia
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Re: Recipes!

#2654

Post by Sugar Magnolia »

So good you had to post it twice? :)

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Re: Recipes!

#2655

Post by Foggy »

Fixed it.
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tek
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Re: Recipes!

#2656

Post by tek »

Continuing on with 'taters..

I like "dirty" mashed potatoes (with the chopped-up skins).
But
I've decided that the best way to mash potatoes is to rice them after boiling.
Skins eff up the ricer pretty badly.

Thinking about boiling the potatoes in their jackets, then sliding the jackets off to rice, then adding back in the chopped up jackets. Have not attempted this yet.

It will have to wait, though. Tomorrow we're going over to a neighbor's to weber-charcoal-smoke a spatchcocked turkey.. I first turned him on to the (non-spatchcocked) charcoal-cooked-turkey a few years back, and we've been doing variations on it every year since.. usually a few weeks before Thanksgiving; for actual Thanksgiving he does the all-out thanksgiving dinner in the traditional way.

Oh, yeah, right, recipes.
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Maybenaut
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Re: Recipes!

#2657

Post by Maybenaut »

Homemade chicken jerky. Three flavors: sriracha, teriyaki, and BBQ.

I made this from ground chicken and golden raisins, salt, onion and garlic powder, and the sauces. They look crappy because I don’t have a mold yet, and formed them by hand.
DE8E9F8A-FE8F-4269-BF5F-08A858F58D00.jpeg
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RTH10260
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Re: Recipes!

#2658

Post by RTH10260 »

;)


Published on 3 Aug 2018

Right now in the U.S. the dairy industry is working to enforce the rules about what products can call themselves milk. They are making the case that nut milks aren't really milks, because they don't come from lactation.

Many agree with this decision because proper definitions in food marketing are important. Other people think this is a silly waste of resources, and that people will always think of almond milk as milk, regardless of the rules.

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Volkonski
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Re: Recipes!

#2659

Post by Volkonski »

:shock: :crying:
AP Eastern US

Verified account

@APEastRegion
2h2 hours ago
More
Shelling out for shellfish: Climate-change study’s findings have implications for consumers, because prices could rise or the U.S. could become more dependent on foreign sources.
Valuable species of shellfish have become harder to find on the East Coast because of degraded habitat caused by a warming environment, according to a pair of scientists that sought to find out whether environmental factors or overfishing was the source of the decline.

The scientists reached the conclusion in studying the decline in the harvest of four commercially important species of shellfish in coastal areas from Maine to North Carolina — eastern oysters, northern quahogs, softshell clams and northern bay scallops. They reported that their findings came down squarely on the side of a warming ocean environment and a changing climate, and not excessive harvest by fishermen.

:snippity:

The scientists observed that the harvest of eastern oysters from Connecticut to Virginia fell from around 600,000 bushels in 1960 to less than 100,000 in 2005. The harvest of the four species declined from 1980 to 2010 after enjoying years of stability from 1950 to 1980, they found.

:snippity:

The study mirrors what Maine clam harvesters are seeing on the state’s tidal flats, said Chad Coffin, a clammer and the president of the Maine Clammers Association. Maine’s harvest of softshell clams — the clams used to make fried clams and clam chowder — dwindled to its lowest point since 1930 last year.
This is bad. This is really bad!

eastern oysters-

The Chesapeake Bay oysters!

northern quahogs-

The chowder clams!

softshell clams-

The long necked steamers!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

northern bay scallops-

The Peconic Bay scallops, the Pearls of the Peconic!
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
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Volkonski
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Re: Recipes!

#2660

Post by Volkonski »

The declining supply of shellfish inspires restaurants to take extreme measures. :o

The 'crawfish mafia' helps cafe owner serve crawfish through the holidays

https://www.chron.com/neighborhood/pear ... =sftwitter
Brook Honore of Honore's Cajun Café in Manvel is pretty secretive of how he gets his crawfish.

"It's a crawfish mafia deal. Obviously, you don't go to the store and get some," Honore said, referencing the slim chances of getting crawfish out of season. "You take care of people and people take care of you."

Most Houstonians are not used to having crawfish in November. According to Honore, it's rare, and you need to know the right people in order to get them. "I get them from Louisiana...and that's all I really have to say about that," Honore said.

While Honore prefers to keep silent on his crawfish connection, he's excited to share with Houstonians that his restaurant plans on offering mud-bugs throughout the holidays.
The usual crawfish season is from early March to late June. Crawfish farms are beginning to control their water temperatures to trick crawfish into thinking it is spring. The crawfish can be made to grow to a marketable size year around.

The number of farms doing this is still small and restaurants buy all the out of season crawfish that are available.
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

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Jez
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Re: Recipes!

#2661

Post by Jez »

When my mom wanted to make a no/low fuss dinner (or was just out of ideas) she would go to her "Chicken Stuff" as she called it. It would be chicken, rice, and cream of something soup. Maybe with a little salt and pepper. It was tasty, filling, and reheats very well.

Last night, I played around with the base recipe and it came out so good. Therefore, I share.

Chicken Bacon Rice Casserole
**********************
2 boneless chicken breasts, trimmed and cut into 1 inch chunks.
3 tsp Herbs de Provence
1 tsp Pepper
1-1/2 Tbsp stone ground mustard
3/4 to 1 cup of diced sweet white onion
2 cloves garlic, minced
3 slices bacon, diced
1 box (approx 1 cup) wild rice
1 cup brown rice
1 cup white rice
1 large (26 oz) can Cream of Something soup (I used cream of chicken).
2 cups Whole milk
Shredded Parmesan cheese
************************
1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Pre-cook the rice until almost done. Wild rice should take about 45 minutes. Regular rice 20-30 minutes.
2. Drain liquid from the rice and set aside.
3. Spray 13x9 baking dish with non-stick cooking spray. Empty can(s) of cream soup into baking dish.
4. Add milk to soup, stir well. It doesn't have to be perfectly incorporated, just well mixed.
5. Add rice to soup mixture, stirring to mix the rice around.
6. In a bowl large enough to hold all the chicken pieces, add chicken, spices, pepper, and mustard. Mix well to coat the chicken. Set aside.
7. Chop up onion and garlic. Set aside.
8. Add bacon to a heated wok and fry until done. Remove from wok. A bit of bacon grease should be left behind in the wok.
9. Add chicken to the wok. stir fry until almost done, about 5 minutes.
10. Add onion and garlic to the wok. Continue to cook, stirring, until onions become translucent and soften.
11. Add chicken, onions, and garlic to the baking dish.
12. Crumble bacon on top of mixture in baking dish and mix in lightly.
13. Sprinkle desired amount of parmesan cheese on top of the mixture.
14. Cover in foil and bake for about 1 hour until rice is tender.
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tek
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Re: Recipes!

#2662

Post by tek »

Tis the season. Mine are currently in the infusion stage.

This is roughly based on the Fanny Farmer recipe.

Dark Fruitcake
1/2 cup butter, softened
1 cup packed brown sugar
grated zest of an orange or lemon
2 large eggs
1/2 cup dark molasses
2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. allspice
1/4 tsp. nutmeg
1/4 tsp. cloves (I used Penzey’s pumpkin pie spice in place of all the spices)
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 cup milk
2 cups small pieces mixed candied fruit (I used 3 cups dates, dried cranberries, dried cherries , home-candied lemon and orange peel))
1/2 cup chopped candied citron
1 cup raisins (I used raisins and currants, soaked for an hour in a bit of rum)
1 cup chopped pecans or walnuts (I used both)

Preheat the oven to 325°F. Line two 8”x4” loaf pans with foil, then butter the foil (I just use everbake spray and skip the foil). Cream the butter, add the brown sugar and orange or lemon zest and beat until light. Add the eggs and beat well, then beat in the molasses. Mix together the flour, baking soda, spices, and salt; add half to the liquids and beat just until blended. Add the milk and beat until smooth, then beat in the rest of the flour just until combined. Stir in the candied fruit, citron, raisins, and nuts.

Spoon into the pans, smooth the tops and bake for 1 to 1 1/4 hours, or until the top is springy to the touch. Let sit for about 10 minutes, then turn out of their pans onto wire racks to cool. When completely cool, wrap well and store in an airtight container.

Brandied Fruit Cake: Soak two large pieces of cheesecloth in brandy (I used rum). Wrap each fruit cake in the cheesecloth, covering all sides, then wrap well in foil. Moisten the cheesecloth with additional brandy every few days for about a week. The brandy will flavor the cake and help preserve it too.
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AndyinPA
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Re: Recipes!

#2663

Post by AndyinPA »

Jez wrote:
Thu Nov 15, 2018 7:12 am
When my mom wanted to make a no/low fuss dinner (or was just out of ideas) she would go to her "Chicken Stuff" as she called it. It would be chicken, rice, and cream of something soup. Maybe with a little salt and pepper. It was tasty, filling, and reheats very well.

Last night, I played around with the base recipe and it came out so good. Therefore, I share.

Chicken Bacon Rice Casserole
**********************
2 boneless chicken breasts, trimmed and cut into 1 inch chunks.
3 tsp Herbs de Provence
1 tsp Pepper
1-1/2 Tbsp stone ground mustard
3/4 to 1 cup of diced sweet white onion
2 cloves garlic, minced
3 slices bacon, diced
1 box (approx 1 cup) wild rice
1 cup brown rice
1 cup white rice
1 large (26 oz) can Cream of Something soup (I used cream of chicken).
2 cups Whole milk
Shredded Parmesan cheese
************************
1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Pre-cook the rice until almost done. Wild rice should take about 45 minutes. Regular rice 20-30 minutes.
2. Drain liquid from the rice and set aside.
3. Spray 13x9 baking dish with non-stick cooking spray. Empty can(s) of cream soup into baking dish.
4. Add milk to soup, stir well. It doesn't have to be perfectly incorporated, just well mixed.
5. Add rice to soup mixture, stirring to mix the rice around.
6. In a bowl large enough to hold all the chicken pieces, add chicken, spices, pepper, and mustard. Mix well to coat the chicken. Set aside.
7. Chop up onion and garlic. Set aside.
8. Add bacon to a heated wok and fry until done. Remove from wok. A bit of bacon grease should be left behind in the wok.
9. Add chicken to the wok. stir fry until almost done, about 5 minutes.
10. Add onion and garlic to the wok. Continue to cook, stirring, until onions become translucent and soften.
11. Add chicken, onions, and garlic to the baking dish.
12. Crumble bacon on top of mixture in baking dish and mix in lightly.
13. Sprinkle desired amount of parmesan cheese on top of the mixture.
14. Cover in foil and bake for about 1 hour until rice is tender.
That looks good! I also grew up on soup casseroles, and I find them satisfying. I don't have a recipe, but occasionally I still just grab a bunch of ingredients I have on hand, mix it all up, and make a casserole. It's also a great way to use leftovers. I don't always use soup, but in my general recipe, it would be soup (sometimes), vegan sour cream, grated cheese, seasonings, mushrooms, noodles, rice, or pasta, onions, garlic, and a meat of some type. I made one just last night with canned tuna. Last night I added chilly peppers to heat it up. My husband loves it any time I get out the casserole dish.
"To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead." -- Thomas Paine

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Jez
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Re: Recipes!

#2664

Post by Jez »

AndyinPA wrote:
Thu Nov 15, 2018 11:01 am
That looks good! I also grew up on soup casseroles, and I find them satisfying. I don't have a recipe, but occasionally I still just grab a bunch of ingredients I have on hand, mix it all up, and make a casserole. It's also a great way to use leftovers. I don't always use soup, but in my general recipe, it would be soup (sometimes), vegan sour cream, grated cheese, seasonings, mushrooms, noodles, rice, or pasta, onions, garlic, and a meat of some type. I made one just last night with canned tuna. Last night I added chilly peppers to heat it up. My husband loves it any time I get out the casserole dish.
I would love to do something with peppers, and normally I do add green or red bell peppers to the mix, but Dawn HATES bell peppers with a passion I rarely see. Plus, she had a her gall bladder taken out several years ago and spicy does not do good things to her. So, I've been cooking more savory then spicy. It's been good for me to experiment in that direction.

It's an ice storm here today, with some snow mixed in. But mostly freezing rain. If I can get out of the driveway tomorrow, I'm hitting up the store and getting some stew meat and gonna make a big ol' pot of beef stew.
I have learned silence from the talkative, toleration from the intolerant, and kindness from the unkind; yet, strange, I am ungrateful to those teachers.

~Khalil Gibran

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AndyinPA
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Re: Recipes!

#2665

Post by AndyinPA »

Jez wrote:
Thu Nov 15, 2018 1:57 pm
AndyinPA wrote:
Thu Nov 15, 2018 11:01 am
That looks good! I also grew up on soup casseroles, and I find them satisfying. I don't have a recipe, but occasionally I still just grab a bunch of ingredients I have on hand, mix it all up, and make a casserole. It's also a great way to use leftovers. I don't always use soup, but in my general recipe, it would be soup (sometimes), vegan sour cream, grated cheese, seasonings, mushrooms, noodles, rice, or pasta, onions, garlic, and a meat of some type. I made one just last night with canned tuna. Last night I added chilly peppers to heat it up. My husband loves it any time I get out the casserole dish.
I would love to do something with peppers, and normally I do add green or red bell peppers to the mix, but Dawn HATES bell peppers with a passion I rarely see. Plus, she had a her gall bladder taken out several years ago and spicy does not do good things to her. So, I've been cooking more savory then spicy. It's been good for me to experiment in that direction.

It's an ice storm here today, with some snow mixed in. But mostly freezing rain. If I can get out of the driveway tomorrow, I'm hitting up the store and getting some stew meat and gonna make a big ol' pot of beef stew.
Same ice storm here! I like to make a big pot of beef stew, too. And I love making corn chowder. I haven't made chili in a while, but it's time to make a big pot of that, too, but I need the freezer for the turkey leftovers, so I guess these will have to wait a while. I'm also hoping to get out of the driveway tomorrow, but mostly to shop for turkey day. I don't really have a recipe for any of those, but make them come out pretty much the same all the time, although a different take wouldn't be a bad thing. When I make any of them, I use a six-quart crockpot that I can brown up the beef or veggies and then slow cook. And I always have leftovers for the freezer. :clap:
"To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead." -- Thomas Paine

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Volkonski
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Re: Recipes!

#2666

Post by Volkonski »

Now I'm hungry for crockpot food but that will have to wait since we leave tomorrow for our younger daughter's wedding and then Thanksgiving at our older daughter's house.

Just going to put this recipe here again in case anyone wants to have it for Thanksgiving-

Volkonski's Dad's Oyster Stuffing.

This has been a Volkonski family favorite every Thanksgiving and Christmas for decades. It can be made the day before and heated in the oven before the big meal.

1 bag Pepperidge Farm Stuffing

2 8 ounce cans of oysters or 16 ounces of fresh oysters

1 cup chopped onions

1 cup chopped celery

2 teaspoons of rubbed sage

3/4 cup dry sherry or cooking sherry

butter

dried parsley

paprika

Make the stuffing according to directions on package with onion, sage and celery except instead of using water or broth substitute the liquid the oysters come packed in and the sherry. If needed, add enough water or vegetable broth to get the total amount of liquid required.

In a baking dish (with cover) spread half the stuffing across the bottom. Evenly place the oysters on the stuffing and cover with the rest of the stuffing. Garnish top with parsley and paprika. Put several butter pats on top.

Cover and bake in a 350F oven for about 30 minutes. Uncover and cook for another 10 to 15 minutes to brown the surface of the stuffing.
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
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AndyinPA
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Re: Recipes!

#2667

Post by AndyinPA »

YUM!
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Lunaluz
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Re: Recipes!

#2668

Post by Lunaluz »

So an update on the Sous Vide experience, it is remarkable how beautiful a Sous Vide Ribeye turns out..perfectly medium rare side to side and top to bottom. I sous vide it for 2 hours at 130 degrees, and sear it in a pan to finish. I also bought a bottom round roast and sous vided it for 24 hours at 135 degrees for French Dip, recipe here https://pressureluckcooking.com/recipe/ ... rench-dip/ It came out lovely, next time however I will use about 131 degrees.

My current project , Sous viding my turkey for Thanksgiving. Today I broke the turkey down, I was intimidated, never having broken down an uncooked turkey before lol, thank god for youtube lots of how to's on it and I managed to get it done, not perfect but good enough. I seared off the various parts and vacuum sealed them and put it back in the fridge. I will sous vide them starting tomorrow, legs and thighs 24 hours at 150 degrees or so, then before bed, turn the bath down and add the breasts at 130 degrees till feast time and finish off with a final sear. I roasted the carcass with some veggies and I am simmering all that to make stock for gravy. So far so good. Recipe instructions here https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/a- ... feast-ever
I will be making homemade creamed corn, bacon wrapped asparagus, a green salad, brussels sprouts with bacon sour cream and Parm cheese, home made dinner rolls, my daughter is making a Pumpkin pie and I am making a Vanilla Caramel No Bake Pie.
I like the sous vide, the turkey won't hog up my oven. I told my kids I am doing an experimental turkey lmao. We will see how this all turns out.

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NMgirl
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Re: Recipes!

#2669

Post by NMgirl »

Lunaluz wrote:
Tue Nov 20, 2018 6:15 pm
So an update on the Sous Vide experience, it is remarkable how beautiful a Sous Vide Ribeye turns out..perfectly medium rare side to side and top to bottom. I sous vide it for 2 hours at 130 degrees, and sear it in a pan to finish. I also bought a bottom round roast and sous vided it for 24 hours at 135 degrees for French Dip, recipe here https://pressureluckcooking.com/recipe/ ... rench-dip/ It came out lovely, next time however I will use about 131 degrees.

My current project , Sous viding my turkey for Thanksgiving. Today I broke the turkey down, I was intimidated, never having broken down an uncooked turkey before lol, thank god for youtube lots of how to's on it and I managed to get it done, not perfect but good enough. I seared off the various parts and vacuum sealed them and put it back in the fridge. I will sous vide them starting tomorrow, legs and thighs 24 hours at 150 degrees or so, then before bed, turn the bath down and add the breasts at 130 degrees till feast time and finish off with a final sear. I roasted the carcass with some veggies and I am simmering all that to make stock for gravy. So far so good. Recipe instructions here https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/a- ... feast-ever
I will be making homemade creamed corn, bacon wrapped asparagus, a green salad, brussels sprouts with bacon sour cream and Parm cheese, home made dinner rolls, my daughter is making a Pumpkin pie and I am making a Vanilla Caramel No Bake Pie.
I like the sous vide, the turkey won't hog up my oven. I told my kids I am doing an experimental turkey lmao. We will see how this all turns out.
Sous vide is a godsend if you don’t cook meat very often and thus don’t have the experience and skillset necessary to cook perfect, done-to-order cuts of expensive meat. When we have houseguests who love a good steak, rack of lamb, etc., I use the sous vide method and the results are beyond satisfying. My Anova has eliminated Extreme Meat Cooking Anxiety Syndrome for me. :thumbs:

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tek
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Re: Recipes!

#2670

Post by tek »

Lunaluz wrote:
Tue Nov 20, 2018 6:15 pm
I told my kids I am doing an experimental turkey lmao. We will see how this all turns out.
Experimental Turkey WBAGNFARB ;)
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Re: Recipes!

#2671

Post by Lunaluz »

I enjoy learning new things.. keeps me sharp... and the control over the meat is phenomenal. I'll post how things turn out.. >wink<

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RTH10260
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Re: Recipes!

#2672

Post by RTH10260 »

Lunaluz wrote:
Tue Nov 20, 2018 6:15 pm
:snippity:
My current project , Sous viding my turkey for Thanksgiving.
:snippity:
The boys at Sous Vide Everything had less of a success...
ABBC3_SPOILER_SHOW

Lunaluz
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Re: Recipes!

#2673

Post by Lunaluz »

A lesson for us all, that was a bad idea from the get. They are good sports for experimenting, but :sick:

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Re: Recipes!

#2674

Post by Foggy »

This spicy pepper relish I discovered at the NC State Fair is wonderful.

https://cottagelanekitchen.com/

Image

This flavor is "Get Me A Switch".

That's Southern for I'm gonna pop you one. :boxing:
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Maybenaut
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Re: Recipes!

#2675

Post by Maybenaut »

Trying to sneak more protein into my diet. Jerky is a great way to grab-and-go protein, but I’m allergic to beef and pork (and venison, bison, dolphin, giraffe, and all other mammals — except large primates, so gorilla is safe, but, well...)

Anyhoo... I’ve been experimenting with chicken jerky. I’m trying to copycat epic bars. The results so far are pretty good, but I’m still tweaking the recipes.

The basic recipe per pound is:

1 lb ground chicken breast
1/2 cup golden raisins (or to taste - more = sweet)
1 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp onion powder
Various flavorings

Here’s what I did:

1. I grind my own chicken breast and cut out *all* the fat because it will go rancid. I’m worried that even the uber-lean ground chicken has too much fat for the dehydrator (ymmv). Also cut out any gristle or skin still attached (Put this in a pot of boiling water — we’re going to make dog treats out of it).
2. Process the raisins into a paste in a food processor.
3. In a large bowl with your (nitrile-gloved) hands, mix the chicken, raisin paste, salt, onion, and garlic together. Any 7-10 year old will be more than happy to assist with this part of the operation.
4. Now you can add whatever flavors you want. I had 4.5 lbs of chicken when I was done trimming (and 1.5 lbs of treats for Maybedog). So I divided it up into 1 lb bowls with 1/2 lb left over, and added to the different bowls:

A. 1/4 cup sriracha (hot, hot, hot, but delicious!)
B. 1 tbsp rosemary, 1 tbsp Italian seasoning (this one was my favorite)
C. 1/8 cup balsamic vinegar, 1 tbsp Italian seasoning (next time, more vinegar, but I didn’t want it too wet)
D. 1/2 cup Sweet Baby Ray’s Original BBQ sauce
E. 1.5 tbsp sugar, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1/2 tsp nutmeg, 1/4 tsp clove (surprisingly good).

Best to work with it cold, so put it in the fridge to firm up a bit. Roll it between two pieces of parchment (I have 2 sticks that are 1/4 in thick that I use to ensure uniform thickness. Lift the top layer of parchment, and with a sharp knife cut meat into desired sizes. Pick up the parchment with the meat on it and flip it onto the tray, then use the knife to separate the pieces a bit.

The dog treats have been happily boiling away all this time, so the fat should have mostly boiled out. Strain and rinse to get any liquid fat off, and put the pieces on a tray for dehydration.

Dehydrate for 8-10 hours in a dehydrator (I have an Excalibur - don’t know about other brands. You can also do it in the oven on the lowest setting with the door cracked, but I don’t know how long it takes.

About the pumpkin spice jerky. That was my grandaughter’s idea, and I thought, well, if it’s horrible, we can give it to the dog. It wasn’t horrible, and in fact it reminded me of traditional mincemeat. So next time I’m going to add things that are in mincemeat, like orange, lemon, currants, and apple. And I’d probably use maple syrup instead of sugar. Chicken candy! Can’t wait!
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"Hey! You know, we left this England place because it was bogus. So if we don't get some cool rules ourselves, pronto, we'll just be bogus too." - Thomas Jefferson

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