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#8851

Post by Whatever4 »

This should probably have its own thread just for the mugshot.[/break1]msnewsnow.com/story/21528455/police-woman-high-on-meth-led-them-on-chase]http://www.msnewsnow.com/story/21528455 ... m-on-chaseUmmm... Anybody here watch Faceoff on SyFy? (Project Runway for Makeup Artists) W2 and I are catching up by watching last season when they did a Dr. Seuss challenge. I swear that mugshot was one of the creatures.
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#8852

Post by Dallasite »

Does anybody have any experience with an island/peninsula range hood? Something like this? http://c.shld.net/rpx/i/s/pi/mp/23833/6 ... 6d[link]36'' Kitchen Glass Stainless Steel Island Range Hood,http://www.sears.com/akdy-new-europe-36 ... ockType=G4[/link]The guest house kitchen is having a bit of a redesign that puts the stove on a peninsula. Mom has never actually had a range hood that worked, but the inspector says there has to be a hood.When we remodeled the kitchen in our old house our cooktop was on a peninsula. We looked at hoods (one very similar to this but with curved glass). We went with a downdraft vent for two reasons. One, I didn't want the hood blocking the view into the kitchen/den and, two, the downdraft was much cheaper. For the hood you will need to reinforce the ceiling where it attaches and run the vent duct out through the roof. If there was a hood in place already you won't have much additional expense.
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#8853

Post by Dolly »

[quote name=verbalobe]

To be completely honest... my heart goes out to her.




verbalobe, that is so nice of you to say that. I feel the same way.


Ashully, the photo reminds me of the image in my bathroom mirror some mornings. :oops:
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#8854

Post by Foggy »

I'm adding your occupation under your avatar in every post, below your location. There are six board styles, so far I fixed subsilver2 only. I'll get to the others later today.





Have fun with it; my occupation says "Obamunist Agitator & Fake American". To change your occupation, go to User Control Panel --► ProfileAnd "alias" is next?I wuz gonna add "number of birther sites that have banned me" but I lost count a long, long time ago. :roll:





As for the lady in the mugshot, all I can say is there are no old speed freaks. Her future isn't bright.
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#8855

Post by Liz »

Speaking of speed freaks in an unrelated way. Are there any NASCAR fans here? I know most consider the sport to be a Republican, redneck, mouth breather sport, but I love it --> By the way, I am none of those adjectives. No, really!
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#8856

Post by ZekeB »

To be completely honest... my heart goes out to her.Meth screws a person up royally. I've seen far worse. Besides her face, they don't show her teeth. Most meth users have totally rotten teeth. Glamour girls, they are not. All it takes is one "experiment" and a person is hooked. Too bad so many users-to-be do not realize that.
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#8857

Post by Dolly »

Yep, just google "Meth Mugshot". plenty of examples there.
Edit: btw, I often wake up weird hairdos. Some are so funny, I have thought of documenting them. I have never tried Meth. I don't like uppers.
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#8858

Post by TollandRCR »

To be completely honest... my heart goes out to her.Meth screws a person up royally. I've seen far worse. Besides her face, they don't show her teeth. Most meth users have totally rotten teeth. Glamour girls, they are not. All it takes is one "experiment" and a person is hooked. Too bad so many users-to-be do not realize that.Many people believe that one must use a drug repeatedly before one can become addicted. Experimentation with speed is "not dangerous" if they do it only once or twice. I had a bright, pleasant, articulate student disappear down that tunnel at the end of the fall semester. He thinks he has it out of his life now, and I hope he is right.
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#8859

Post by Johnny Foreigner »

Yep, just google "Meth Mugshot". plenty of examples there.
Edit: btw, [highlight]I often wake up weird hairdos[/highlight]. Some are so funny, I have thought of documenting them. I have never tried Meth. I don't like uppers.
Do you poke them with sticks or something? ;)
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#8860

Post by MaineSkeptic »

Many people believe that one must use a drug repeatedly before one can become addicted. Experimentation with speed is "not dangerous" if they do it only once or twice.For some people (and I would guess the majority, though it's just a guess), that turns out to be true. In my experience, individuals react to potentially addictive substances and practices in widely divergent ways, depending on personal attributes, environment, and possibly other factors. I was brought up to believe that a single hit of cocaine was enough to cause addiction, but back in the 80s, when I was hanging out with a Wall St. crowd, cocaine use was very common. Some developed serious problems; most did not.(I remember that, back in the Vietnam era, heroin use was sufficiently widespread among our troops overseas that there were major concerns about an epidemic of addiction when the servicemembers returned stateside. To be sure, there was something of a problem, but people were also surprised to find out how many in the grips of what was thought to be an iron-clad addiction simply abandoned the habit when their circumstances changed -- when they were back at home among loved ones and the availability of cheap, high-grade heroin was severely reduced. There's an interesting overview [link]here,[/link].)Nevertheless, for many people, a single experimental use has proven sufficient to lead to profound losses, including financial and medical disasters and even death. If you are in that high-risk group -- and you may not know it until it's too late -- a seemingly small misstep can have dire consequences.That's a hard message to communicate to the vulnerable. It's something like Russian roulette -- if you're lucky, it's absolutely harmless. But not everyone is.
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#8861

Post by SueDB »

One of the other issues is if even if he/she/it used for the first time, they are taking the chance of getting busted one way or another. The longer it goes, the more chances as USUALLY drug users get sloppy after a while. A bust can ruin your financial future almost as bad as abuse (unless you are a doctor - for some reason Docs all close ranks around an abuser making it very hard to deal with docs). :( :( :( :(
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#8862

Post by TollandRCR »

Many people believe that one must use a drug repeatedly before one can become addicted. Experimentation with speed is "not dangerous" if they do it only once or twice.For some people (and I would guess the majority, though it's just a guess), that turns out to be true. In my experience, individuals react to potentially addictive substances and practices in widely divergent ways, depending on personal attributes, environment, and possibly other factors. ...Do our medical experts classify some drugs are "instantly addictive" for a large proportion of the population and would Methamphetamine be one such drug? I have seen evidence of recovery from addiction to heroin and cocaine, although I also know of a young man who died on his "last night out" before going into the Navy to break his heroin addiction. He was the best friend of one of my students.
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#8863

Post by SueDB »

Many people believe that one must use a drug repeatedly before one can become addicted. Experimentation with speed is "not dangerous" if they do it only once or twice.For some people (and I would guess the majority, though it's just a guess), that turns out to be true. In my experience, individuals react to potentially addictive substances and practices in widely divergent ways, depending on personal attributes, environment, and possibly other factors. ...Do our medical experts classify some drugs are "instantly addictive" for a large proportion of the population and would Methamphetamine be one such drug? I have seen evidence of recovery from addiction to heroin and cocaine, although I also know of a young man who died on his "last night out" before going into the Navy to break his heroin addiction. He was the best friend of one of my students.As far as I know from the Pharmaceutical standpoint, nothing is considered "instantly addicting" [-X . The exception is when you try to twist the facts to fit your perception or political outlook such as when the reich wing screams that they want more money and dictatorial powers. :- :- :-
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#8864

Post by MaineSkeptic »

Do our medical experts classify some drugs are "instantly addictive" for a large proportion of the population and would Methamphetamine be one such drug? I have seen evidence of recovery from addiction to heroin and cocaine...Good questions, though I should note that the point I was making had less to do with recovery from addiction that with the question of when "addiction" is the right word to describe habitual uses of potentially addictive substances -- not about my friends who recovered from cocaine addiction but rather those who used it regularly for a time but could not, at least to my way of thinking, be described as addicts.
Edit: edited for clarity
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#8865

Post by Dolly »

Bill Moyers, oldest son struggled with drugs and alcohol. He produced work on addiction. Moyers on Addiction: Close to Home (1998) Portrait of Addiction - In-depth exploration of the pain of addiciton and possibility of recovery.This link has a 56 minute video. [/break1]com/content/moyers-on-addiction-close-to-home/]http://billmoyers.com/content/moyers-on ... e-to-home/Here is the DVD series with blurbs about the content. Moyers on Addiction DVD Professional Series - Close to Home Collection - 5 DVD Collection [/break1]hazelden.org/OA_HTML/ibeCCtpItmDspRte.jsp?item=6736]http://www.hazelden.org/OA_HTML/ibeCCtp ... ?item=6736In one of his programs, I remember them explaining how drugs affect people differently. It depends on how your brain is wired (for my lack of better words) whether a person becomes addicted or not. Some people become addicted to a drug the first time they use it.Person A could experiment with Heroin several times and have no desire for more. But if he smokes Crack, can become trapped.Person B would have the exact opposite reaction. It depends on the person.
Edit: add another link: [/break1]nytimes.com/1998/03/20/nyregion/celebrity-s-son-big-connections-addictions-ordeal-moyers-family-underlies-tv.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm]http://www.nytimes.com/1998/03/20/nyreg ... all&src=pm
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btw, [highlight]I often wake up weird hairdos[/highlight]. Some are so funny, I have thought of documenting them.Do you poke them with sticks or something? ;) :oops: Good catch. :oldlady: :D
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#8866

Post by MRich »

Speaking of speed freaks in an unrelated way. Are there any NASCAR fans here? I know most consider the sport to be a Republican, redneck, mouth breather sport, but I love it --> By the way, I am none of those adjectives. No, really!Liz, I live near Bristol (TN), but my only ties to NASCAR are having relatives and friends who occasionally work at the track on race day. But I meet race fans from all over the country, and it's not just a redneck sport. I have a friend who rents out a bedroom in her house to a couple of MDs from New Jersey every year. We do have a member (Lea) who I know is a fan, but she's been sick and she hasn't been here since October.
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#8867

Post by Maybenaut »

I have seen evidence of recovery from addiction to heroin and cocaine, although I also know of a young man who died on his "last night out" before going into the Navy to break his heroin addiction.It really saddens me when I hear about young people literally throwing their lives away over drugs. Having said that, I could not imagine how difficult it would be to try to break any addiction through basic training in the military. It's hard enough when you're healthy. And, of course, the first thing they do when you get there is give you a drug test. If it comes back positive for opiate metabolites, you'd likely be separated.
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#8868

Post by esseff44 »

Many people believe that one must use a drug repeatedly before one can become addicted. Experimentation with speed is "not dangerous" if they do it only once or twice.For some people (and I would guess the majority, though it's just a guess), that turns out to be true. In my experience, individuals react to potentially addictive substances and practices in widely divergent ways, depending on personal attributes, environment, and possibly other factors. I was brought up to believe that a single hit of cocaine was enough to cause addiction, but back in the 80s, when I was hanging out with a Wall St. crowd, cocaine use was very common. Some developed serious problems; most did not.(I remember that, back in the Vietnam era, heroin use was sufficiently widespread among our troops overseas that there were major concerns about an epidemic of addiction when the servicemembers returned stateside. To be sure, there was something of a problem, but people were also surprised to find out how many in the grips of what was thought to be an iron-clad addiction simply abandoned the habit when their circumstances changed -- when they were back at home among loved ones and the availability of cheap, high-grade heroin was severely reduced. There's an interesting overview [link]here,[/link].)Nevertheless, for many people, a single experimental use has proven sufficient to lead to profound losses, including financial and medical disasters and even death. If you are in that high-risk group -- and you may not know it until it's too late -- a seemingly small misstep can have dire consequences.That's a hard message to communicate to the vulnerable. It's something like Russian roulette -- if you're lucky, it's absolutely harmless. But not everyone is.Thanks for the link to that NPR report. I was intrigued by the Viet Nam study and I have to take issue with it based on personal experience and observations as did some of the comments to the article by people who were there at that time. I knew a lot of people who were addicted, both military and civilian. I knew vets who volunteered to go back for another tour just so they could maintain their habit. Some hired on as civilians in NGO's and government contractors to go back, make a lot of money and maintain their habit without being harassed about it. The heroin was high-grade, cheap and available on most every street corner. One did not have to steal or rob to avoid the agony of withdrawal. It was no different that getting that morning coffee and donut or whatever it is that gets one going in the morning or that afternoon cocktail or beer after a hard day at work. The report that was mentioned was a shocker and heroin use was widespread among the troops. It was one of the main reasons to pull them out sooner and faster. The rates were shooting up. The troops were not shooting up heroin though. They didn't have to. It was so pure that you just dusted a cigarette with in. None of that cooking and injecting and cutting and worrying about what it was being cut with and how much. The big negatives were absent. So, what about coming home? Well, there were huge negatives that stopped a lot of people but a very high percentage did not make it. The reasons are the same as why heroin addicts here did not make it. I knew of lot of those as well.One of the jobs I had when I returned from 5 years in SE Asia in 1971 was doing interviews of heroin addicts who were in a methadone program. The study was sponsored by Johns Hopkins and I think I still have a copy of the interview questions in my files somewhere. I interviewed local young people from good families raised here in the city. They told me how good heroin made them feel and what a drag methadone was. They told me all the bad things they had done to get the money to avoid withdrawal, stealing from grandma, writing bad checks on everyone they could. They told me how they could function just fine and normally if they could get their fix. The problem was not the heroin. The problem was they could not afford it. If they had been given free heroin instead of free methadone (which made a lot of money for the legitimate drug dealers), they would be much better off. The requirements of going in everyday for testing and all kinds of humiliations did not help and there were bad side effects that made them feel lousy and sick.The really sad part is that a lot of the people I have liked a lot because of their talent and compassion and intellect were drug addicts. The fear and agony of withdrawal made them untrustworthy. I only know one who has made it and he goes through cycles of relapse and rehab. He happened to be born into a wealthy and famous family that could afford to keep him going even after he depleted his trust fund. He is still the best company of any one I know and would fit right in here. He was on the streets starving when I first met him. His father was practicing 'tough love' and just waiting 'for that call in the night.' I brought him home and fed him until I could talk to this mother, a nurse who had remarried and moved across the country. A month later, she came and got him and helped him get help. He completed a technical course in record time and was hired to build and program a satellite. As soon as he was finished with the project, he was laid off and then relapsed. He was fine as long as he was working. He could not handle idleness. I learned from him about all the good intentions of government -funded programs for addicts and why they fail. Many of them are run by drug dealers and they do not separate the people who can benefit from those who can't or don't want to. If I were King, I would make him drug czar as well as mental health czar. He had a triple diagnosis of drug addiction, alcohol addiction and bi-polar. He also had an IQ that went off the scale, a great sense of humor, a photographic memory, a strong constitution that survival multiple overdoses and Hep C and so on, and a strong sense of morality that kept him out of trouble with the law.And then there was crack. Don't get me started. I could write a book about the crack addicts. They have not fared well. The laws made sure of that. Meth is another thing altogether. Police officers tell me they are the toughest and most dangerous to deal with. They have super human strength and energy while their brains are fritzing like a shorted out transformer. It seems to be a rural thing and not much of a city thing. I wonder why.Addiction is one of those words that is really meaningless because it has too many meanings and no one is sure what is meant by it or what it is or what to do about it. It has to do with the release of natural substances in the brain that give us a sense of pleasure or well-being. Who wants to give that up? I was so surprised last year when I was having a little problem with the clinic nurses and I started reading up on the biochemistry of vomiting. Why do you feel so much better after throwing up? It's accompanied by a release of those natural drugs that makes you feel good. Could that explain bulemia? Like chocolate, like falling in love, like flattery, like good food?
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Post by TollandRCR »

I have seen evidence of recovery from addiction to heroin and cocaine, although I also know of a young man who died on his "last night out" before going into the Navy to break his heroin addiction.It really saddens me when I hear about young people literally throwing their lives away over drugs. Having said that, I could not imagine how difficult it would be to try to break any addiction through basic training in the military. It's hard enough when you're healthy. And, of course, the first thing they do when you get there is give you a drug test. If it comes back positive for opiate metabolites, you'd likely be separated.That seems to be a fairly common fantasy or hope among young men -- that the military will help clean them up. As I understand them, the Navy is particularly attractive because their opportunities to indulge are (supposedly) reduced. The operative idea here is "clean them up." We need better, more humane ways of helping them achieve that, and putting them in prison is not one of those ways.
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Post by Dolly »

Ry Cooder's "Feelin Good"Feelin' good, feelin' goodAll the money in the world spent on feelin' goodlyrics [/break1]allthelyrics.com/lyrics/cooder_ry/feelin_good-lyrics-1164659.html]http://www.allthelyrics.com/lyrics/cood ... 64659.html
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#8871

Post by Maybenaut »

That seems to be a fairly common fantasy or hope among young men -- that the military will help clean them up. As I understand them, the Navy is particularly attractive because their opportunities to indulge are (supposedly) reduced. The operative idea here is "clean them up." We need better, more humane ways of helping them achieve that, and putting them in prison is not one of those ways.Unfortunately, that the Navy is more forgiving than the other services where drugs are concerned is a myth. The Navy has "mandatory processing," meaning that they have to provide a certain amount of due process before they can put you out. But at the end of the day, out you'll be. Although they are theoretically possible, second chances for drugs are extremely rare in any of the services.I completely agree that prison isn't the answer. I've often wondered what wholesale decriminalization of all drugs would look like.
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#8872

Post by MaineSkeptic »

Addiction is one of those words that is really meaningless because it has too many meanings and no one is sure what is meant by it or what it is or what to do about it. It has to do with the release of natural substances in the brain that give us a sense of pleasure or well-being. Who wants to give that up?Thanks for all your insights, especially concerning your personal experiences.I find the part I quoted especially interesting. Not wanting to give up something pleasurable is a position that pretty much all of us have been in at one time or another, but it seems to me that a word like "addiction" has to mean more than that if we are to take it seriously.We've all at times walked away from something we enjoyed. When we get too fat we cut down on our intake (far more difficult for some than for others, to be sure). When the movie is over we leave the theater. And, for many, when the recreational drug runs out, we do without it.My principal experience is with cocaine. I've known people who had so much difficulty doing without it that their lives were ruined by it. I've also known people -- a far greater number -- who simply stopped for one reason or another and never looked back, or stopped with no particular goal in mind, returning to it if circumstances permitted but not caring if they didn't. And I wouldn't be surprised if the same person might find himself in one category or the other depending on circumstances.That's one of the reasons it's such a difficult issue -- even among adults who can be expected to have some degree of self-knowledge, but much more so among youngsters whose naive view of themselves often includes fantasies of invulnerability.
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#8873

Post by esseff44 »

Yep, whatever it is that produces a release of this feel good substance:Endorphins ("endogenous morphine") are endogenous opioid peptides that function as neurotransmitters.[1] They are produced by the pituitary gland and the hypothalamus in vertebrates during exercise,[2] excitement, pain, consumption of spicy food, love and orgasm,[3][4] and they resemble the opiates in their abilities to produce analgesia and a feeling of well-being.[/break1]wikipedia.org/wiki/Endorphin]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EndorphinWe are all addicts of some kind or another. We are just lucky if we can afford or can easily obtain whatever it is that makes us feel good. Even pain releases endorphins which explains a lot of strange behavior.
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#8874

Post by kate520 »

Spicy foods? :shock: cool.
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#8875

Post by Dolly »

That's one of the reasons it's such a difficult issue -- even among adults who can be expected to have some degree of self-knowledge, but much more so among youngsters whose naive view of themselves often includes fantasies of invulnerability.And it is not just "drugs". I remember a guy in my high school class in the late 60's that ruined his mind by sniffing glue.My Brother In Law had an employee a few years ago whose junior high daughter was very involved with huffing paint. When her parents confronted her, she turned them in to Child Services or something. They had to go to court. The DA (or whatever) asked them before the trial, "What's the deal here?" When the dad explained, the DA said don't worry about being prosecuted. His son had the same problem and he knew what they were going through.
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