Cycling

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Sugar Magnolia
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Re: Cycling

#26

Post by Sugar Magnolia »

pipistrelle wrote: Mon Sep 21, 2020 10:42 pm I have a $750 bike. Like a $7k bike it has two wheels.
What a coincidence! So does my $30 bike!


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pipistrelle
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Re: Cycling

#27

Post by pipistrelle »

Sugar Magnolia wrote: Tue Sep 22, 2020 5:49 am
pipistrelle wrote: Mon Sep 21, 2020 10:42 pm I have a $750 bike. Like a $7k bike it has two wheels.
What a coincidence! So does my $30 bike!
I wish. Unfortunately I have special needs.


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Re: Cycling

#28

Post by Foggy »

My bike is so old I can't remember what I paid for it, certainly less than $500. An ancient Cannondale, I got it in the mid-80s.


But a few years ago I realized it was seriously deteriorating, so I paid $400 to a local bike shop for a "complete mechanical disassembly and reassembly". Every nut, bolt, ball bearing, everything in little pieces, and then they put it back together. Best $400 I ever spent. :blink:


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RTH10260
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Re: Cycling

#29

Post by RTH10260 »

pipistrelle wrote: Mon Sep 21, 2020 10:42 pm I have a $750 bike. Like a $7k bike it has two wheels.
It's Singapore dollars, but that still makes it US$ 5.2K :doh:


qbawl
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Re: Cycling

#30

Post by qbawl »

Foggy wrote: Tue Sep 22, 2020 7:49 am My bike is so old I can't remember what I paid for it, certainly less than $500. An ancient Cannondale, I got it in the mid-80s.


But a few years ago I realized it was seriously deteriorating, so I paid $400 to a local bike shop for a "complete mechanical disassembly and reassembly". Every nut, bolt, ball bearing, everything in little pieces, and then they put it back together. Best $400 I ever spent. :blink:
I had a Cannondale I got just about the same time as you maybe a little earlier. I loved that bike. My son has it now but it doesn't really fit him (top tube too short I think). He has a bunch of bikes in the basement in various states of assembly. Plus the ones he actually rides on his commutes. Question: "What is the proper number of bikes to own?" Answer: "One more than I have and one less than drives the wife over the edge." I have a recumbent trike that unfortunately I haven't ridden for a while but hopefully will get back to it soon.


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JohnPCapitalist
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Re: Cycling

#31

Post by JohnPCapitalist »

pipistrelle wrote: Mon Sep 21, 2020 10:42 pm I have a $750 bike. Like a $7k bike it has two wheels.
I have both a $700 mountain bike and one that cost more than $7,000 when new (I bought it used for substantially less than that). You don't have to know much about bikes to feel the differences intuitively if you were to ride them.

Example: the $700 bike gets me around town and does ok on gentle trails. But the suspension is not adjustable for my weight, which means the front fork bottoms out really easily on anything more complex than a dirt road. That means more risks of wheel damage and pinch flats.

Suspension is just one of the differences -- everything on the expensive bike is designed to be durable and lightweight. You could point to any component on the expensive bike and I would be able to tell you how it's designed to last while not building a 90-pound bike.

The durability means that virtually anything I can do on the bike will not break something so significantly that I would face the dreaded long walk back to the car. It's no fun being up in the mountains with the sun starting to go down and facing a 15 mile walk back to the car, especially if you're carrying a bike with a taco'd wheel.

There are a number of videos where pro riders will take a $200 Walmart mountain bike down a trail at one of the downhill mountain bike parks. The odds of a bike like that surviving a single trip like that are about 50-50. But a high quality bike on some of the gnarliest rock gardens you've ever seen will keep going day after day all season long.

A similar equation holds true for road bikes. A $7,000 road bike with carbon frame and high-quality wheels is going to be more efficient at transforming power out of your legs into speed on the roads, because the carbon won't flex side-to-side as you stomp on the pedals, but it also has vertical flex built in, which reduces the vibration that makes your hands numb on long rides. Braking is much better, especially with the new hydraulic discs available on road bikes. "Through axles" instead of the standard quick release skewers mean more stability on high speed descents. And on and on and on. My road bike is way less than $7,000 but has enough of these gizmos that the ride is vastly better than a $700 bike.


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MN-Skeptic
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Re: Cycling

#32

Post by MN-Skeptic »

My sister-in-law in Seattle puts thousands of miles on her bike each year. I never realized before I knew her that there are groups who will put together several-day biking trips. Washington, Oregon, California, wherever. And not on flat land which is what I would do. (As a former resident of Iowa, I had to chuckle when I heard someone who had participated in Iowa's annual cross country bike ride - RAGBRAI - "Iowa isn't flat!") Anyway, my SIL just bought a real pretty Cervelo bike.


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Re: Cycling

#33

Post by JohnPCapitalist »

MN-Skeptic wrote: Tue Sep 22, 2020 12:44 pm My sister-in-law in Seattle puts thousands of miles on her bike each year. I never realized before I knew her that there are groups who will put together several-day biking trips. Washington, Oregon, California, wherever. And not on flat land which is what I would do. (As a former resident of Iowa, I had to chuckle when I heard someone who had participated in Iowa's annual cross country bike ride - RAGBRAI - "Iowa isn't flat!") Anyway, my SIL just bought a real pretty Cervelo bike.
Iowa most certainly is not flat. I did RAGBRAI a couple times in the 1980s. I still remember the last day one year, where we went from (IIRC) Cedar Rapids to Guttenberg (20 miles north of Dubuque on the river). We went through the charming German-heritage town of Elkader. I remember the hills in that part of the state being seriously reminiscent of New England's glacial walls -- short, steep and nasty. There were some really brutal climbs that made it the hardest day of the ride.


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MN-Skeptic
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Re: Cycling

#34

Post by MN-Skeptic »

JohnPCapitalist wrote: Tue Sep 22, 2020 3:56 pm
Iowa most certainly is not flat.
I know they altered the RAGBRAI route each year so that you went through different parts of the state each year. I lived in Independence (25 miles east of Waterloo) from 8th grade thru college. Great farm land, only mildly rolling. My sweetie was from NE Iowa, a small town not far from Decorah which was a very hilly part of the state. I know RAGBRAI has gone through both towns over the years.


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