Gardening 2019

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p0rtia
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Re: Gardening 2019

#51

Post by p0rtia » Sun Jul 07, 2019 1:03 pm

Awesome Bill_G. :heart: Today is definitely the day to take garden piccies. Let the summer in.
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Re: Gardening 2019

#52

Post by Whatever4 » Sun Jul 07, 2019 2:07 pm

FEMA Camp 626 has a garden. This new plot was wrestled with great effort from piles of lumber and trash. It’s a thing of beauty. Verbie and Listeme are hard workers!
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The rest of the garden, with radishes, potatoes, tomatoes, garlic, etc. Maine is weeks behind other parts of the country.
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And Shadow, a very nice lamb.

71876F2E-2B02-4A45-949A-9488E5A01273.jpeg
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Re: Gardening 2019

#53

Post by p0rtia » Sun Jul 07, 2019 2:56 pm

:heart:
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Re: Gardening 2019

#54

Post by Bill_G » Sun Jul 07, 2019 3:59 pm

Bill_G wrote:
Sat Jun 22, 2019 7:33 am
The strawberries have come and gone.
... and turned into jam. Between the flat we grew, the flat we bought, and the flat we were given, we made a half dozen pints, and two dozen half pint gift jars. We also canned several flats of the neighbors blueberries, red raspberries, and Marion berries (a domestic var of blackberries). On the 4th, we walked around handing out gift bags to the neighbors as Thank You! gifts for being so great.

With the remaining berries, I made a couple quarts of cordial (non-alcoholic). Taste test today says it's past the "green vine" flavor, and started moving towards "banana". I flavor adjusted the batch with a small amount of sugar, lemon juice, and apple cider. We canned it in pints jars using the inversion method. We opened a jar of last year's on the 4th, and it was yummy. Mixed 50/50 with vodka, it was great. Sure to go well with champagne or 7-Up.
Bill_G wrote:
Sat Jun 22, 2019 7:33 am
I need to replant beans again for the third time.
I had to replant a fourth time. This time I bought different seed. This years Ed Hume French fillet beans were a bust. Very low viability. So, I bought Contender - a Kentucky Wonder bush var - and Jade - a Blue Lake bush var. Got nearly 90% germination. I thinned the rows this morning to every other plant to give each one about ten inches. That makes for easier cultivation, and better harvest.

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Re: Gardening 2019

#55

Post by Bill_G » Sun Jul 07, 2019 4:01 pm

p0rtia wrote:
Sun Jul 07, 2019 1:03 pm
Awesome Bill_G. :heart: Today is definitely the day to take garden piccies. Let the summer in.
Definitely let the Summer in. It's still mild around here. Great for the veggies. They are putting on blooms like crazy. Once the heat hits, they will move towards fruit growth and stop setting flowers.

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Re: Gardening 2019

#56

Post by Bill_G » Sun Jul 07, 2019 4:03 pm

Whatever4 wrote:
Sun Jul 07, 2019 2:07 pm
FEMA Camp 626 has a garden. This new plot was wrestled with great effort from piles of lumber and trash. It’s a thing of beauty. Verbie and Listeme are hard workers!
Great photos. Maine may be later, but it has longer days to make up for it, though you may have to coax the tomotoes with a tent to get extended heat for ripening.

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Re: Gardening 2019

#57

Post by Maybenaut » Sun Jul 07, 2019 4:41 pm

My sister is a flower farmer — she grows cut flowers on her farm. Today I went out with her to cut some lilies, snap dragons, gladiolas, dianthus, and a few others whose names I either cannot recall or cannot pronounce.
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Re: Gardening 2019

#58

Post by p0rtia » Sun Jul 07, 2019 5:00 pm

Bill_G wrote:
Sun Jul 07, 2019 4:01 pm
p0rtia wrote:
Sun Jul 07, 2019 1:03 pm
Awesome Bill_G. :heart: Today is definitely the day to take garden piccies. Let the summer in.
Definitely let the Summer in. It's still mild around here. Great for the veggies. They are putting on blooms like crazy. Once the heat hits, they will move towards fruit growth and stop setting flowers.
Where are you? I'm in upstate NY. Very shady where I am, so I grow a selected assortment of vegetables, mostly for the flowers! Pickling cukes are great for that. Beans and cherry maters are about the only things that actually bear. Heat doesn't ever really hit, because shade. But I have to water. Tricky when you're off grid, but I gots downspout diverters!
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Re: Gardening 2019

#59

Post by Azastan » Sun Jul 07, 2019 9:43 pm

I am way behind on the gardening, due to the ridiculous amount of snow that we had here in my part of town. The grass keeps growing, I keep mowing. My horses can't keep up with the growth!

I don't do a lot of organized gardening, but this year I went down to Olympia to attend a dahlia tuber sale put on by the local dahlia club, and bought 23 varieties. They all got planted in tubs on my deck, well away from the edge of the deck. Last year one of the horses decided she was going to eat my just-about-to-flower big red dinnerplate dahlia and I wasn't going to let them do that this year.

I've also gained some chickens since last year. My neighbour loves hatching out chicks, so she sent me 8 chicks. Two of them went to freezer camp since unfortunately for them, they were....ermmm....too noisy in the morning. There's still one rooster, an odd little guy who is mostly a glossy green-black with gold epaulets. We think he's a silky cross of some sort. But he's small and inoffensive, so he gets to stay.

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Re: Gardening 2019

#60

Post by Bill_G » Mon Jul 08, 2019 8:53 am

p0rtia wrote:
Sun Jul 07, 2019 5:00 pm

Where are you? I'm in upstate NY. Very shady where I am, so I grow a selected assortment of vegetables, mostly for the flowers! Pickling cukes are great for that. Beans and cherry maters are about the only things that actually bear. Heat doesn't ever really hit, because shade. But I have to water. Tricky when you're off grid, but I gots downspout diverters!
We're in Portland in the burbs south of town along the Willamette River. Full civilization with city water. I didn't realize you were off grid having to bring in your own water. That can be a challenge. Reminds me of friends in Almagordo NM where water is a very big deal. They got all sciencey about soil moisture and minimum requirements per species for optimal (eyes glaze over) blah blah blah. I was much younger then. I would probably gobble it up now. Around here, for people off grid, or at least off the water grid, they collect lots of runoff in ponds, some natural, some man-made, to sustain their agriculture. If they have any water rights at all, they get a well and pump in.

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Re: Gardening 2019

#61

Post by p0rtia » Mon Jul 08, 2019 9:06 am

I collect rainwater from the roof. Four rain barrels. So not so bad for my tiny garden. No water pressure for hoses, but I have a system :-D

Only problem is when I will be away for ten days in August. It's sink or swim for the garden then. But the bush beans will be by by then.I have a lot of perennials, so the devastation is never too bad.
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Re: Gardening 2019

#62

Post by DejaMoo » Mon Jul 08, 2019 9:15 am

My favorite garden vegetable is cucumbers. I personally prefer picklers over slicers. They are firmer, less watery, and have more flavor. Not to mention they come in sooner and are much more prolific.

Incidentally, Straight Eight is another old-timer open-pollinated slicer variety which was supplanted decades ago by yet another open-pollinated variety - "Marketmore". Reason: Straight Eight's skin tends to be thicker and have a bitter taste. That's the reason why people got into the habit of peeling cucumbers. They've been working to breed the bitterness out of cucumbers, but Straight Eight is one of the old-timers, so it's more noticeable.

Ed Hume is another small seed company that, like the one I worked for, and like Burpee's and all the other seed companies around, buys their seed in bulk from the companies that grow it and repacks it in smaller packages under their own label. The growers test the seeds before shipping to ensure they meet the minimum standards for viability. But Ed Hume probably does what the growers and all of the re-packagers do: mix leftover seed from previous year(s) with the seed bought this year from the grower. (That's why the packages say, "Packed for <year>", not "Grown for <year>".) You're supposed to test again for germination after doing so, to ensure it still meets minimum viability. But the testing is done under optimal conditions, in a lab/greenhouse, NOT outdoors and thus not subject to the vagaries of nature. So it's possible their seed failed to meet minimum viability, or it could just be that this year's rotten spring weather in much of the US took its toll on seeds.

ETA: IOW, seeds with the same variety name all comes from the same grower(s), regardless of who you buy it from. Meaning it doesn't matter who you buy it from. The only difference will be the price and the re-packagers name on the seed pack.
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Re: Gardening 2019

#63

Post by Maybenaut » Mon Jul 08, 2019 10:10 am

p0rtia wrote:
Mon Jul 08, 2019 9:06 am
I collect rainwater from the roof. Four rain barrels. So not so bad for my tiny garden. No water pressure for hoses, but I have a system :-D

Only problem is when I will be away for ten days in August. It's sink or swim for the garden then. But the bush beans will be by by then.I have a lot of perennials, so the devastation is never too bad.
If you have a pump, you can put it on a timer.

Before we had electricity and running* water at the cabin, we would bring in 8gal containers from home, and fill a 65 gal tank. To solve the problem of no water pressure, we used a 12-volt Sureflo pump, connected to a car charging battery pack. Worked like a champ - it provided sufficient water pressure to trip the switch on the propane on-demand water heater. You can get the Sureflo pumps in 12v or 115v, but either way you have to wire the plug connection to the power supply (we wired a cigarette-lighter plug to plug into the battery pack; after we got electricity we bought a 115v pump, wired a regular plug, and plugged it into the wall).

* We still don’t have “running” water. It jogs. Sometimes it merely walks at a brisk pace. We don’t have a source of fresh water on our property, so we have 2K gallons of water trucked in to fill an underground cistern. We keep a half-dozen 5gal containers of bottled water on hand. We can’t really capture rainwater reliably because we’re in the woods and it comes down so dirty that it’s too much trouble to make it useable. We do have a pond and have been known, on occasion, to pump water out of the pond and use for emergency toilet-flushing when our water delivery guy was out of commission. I can also distill water, but it’s a great deal of work for a small quantity. But I can make clean, safe drinking water from the pond in an emergency.
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Re: Gardening 2019

#64

Post by p0rtia » Mon Jul 08, 2019 7:29 pm

Maybenaut wrote:
Mon Jul 08, 2019 10:10 am

If you have a pump, you can put it on a timer.
Alas I don't think so. For starters I'd have to invest in dripper hose, and get creative about the hanging pots, but mainly, I don't have much in the way of power, and what I have is solar. I turn off the 110 every night, let alone when I'm not there. I could hook up a pump to my 12 volt system and a battery operated timer, but I would have to connect all of the barrels at the bottoms instead of the tops, and on and on. Too much for one or two weeks a year in a three-season cabin.

I have a micro-irrigation system in Florida, which I put in, so I appreciate how wonderful it is, but it also tells me that it would not work here. If I wanted to spend the money I would hire someone to water--in fact I'd do that if I was able to actually find someone to hire to do odd jobs here. Which I can't, despite lots of trying over ten years.

Anyway, very cool to hear about your cabin. I so relate! I've contemplated a cistern, but am first going to see if I can drill a point that will fix me up with a better supply (although still not pressurized, though I would hook it up to a 12v pump).

I already have two Sureflo pumps (!), one for the shower (tankless water heater fed by a 20 gal tank) and one form my kitchen sink, which is plumbed to one of the rain barrels.

I'm in the woods too, and yes, the water is yeller from the leaves above the roof. But that's okay for the garden. I have a fancy filter for the kitchen sink water, but it is still yeller and I don't use it for drinking water (wouldn't want to ask guests to drink it). And I haul in shower water (I used rain water at first, but it is not clean enough, and I started to get itchy!). Have a guest coming in at the end of the month--I'll be hauling extra water for that, but it's close and I'm used to doing chores.

Reminds you of where our species came from when you live off-grid.
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Re: Gardening 2019

#65

Post by Maybenaut » Mon Jul 08, 2019 9:23 pm

p0rtia wrote:
Mon Jul 08, 2019 7:29 pm

I'm in the woods too, and yes, the water is yeller from the leaves above the roof. But that's okay for the garden. I have a fancy filter for the kitchen sink water, but it is still yeller and I don't use it for drinking water (wouldn't want to ask guests to drink it). And I haul in shower water (I used rain water at first, but it is not clean enough, and I started to get itchy!). Have a guest coming in at the end of the month--I'll be hauling extra water for that, but it's close and I'm used to doing chores.

Reminds you of where our species came from when you live off-grid.
Your place sounds awesome! Anyhoo, we use our place year 'round, although I have to say I'm not as enamored of it as I used to be since I got that f'in tick bite.

But it was a lot of fun solving all of these problems. We ended up with the cistern because the county health guy said getting decent water in our part of the Blue Ridge is a crapshoot, and you could spend $5K and get 10 gallons a minute of the sweetest, purest water you could hope for, or spend $20K and get sludge, and there's no way to tell. Our neighbor has a well, and she said her water is really sulphury. I'm good with the cistern. It's not that expensive to have it delivered, and we are very conservative (when we were hauling it from home we learned to be careful with it).

When we finally got the cistern and plumbed the place for realz, we left all of the temporary plumbing in place but capped off so if we have to shift back to external tanks (like when the water guy's truck broke down), we can do it easily.
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Re: Gardening 2019

#66

Post by Bill_G » Wed Jul 10, 2019 8:35 am

It's just so hard to imagine there are places in upstate NY that don't have running water. It's seems anachronistic. But, bravo for you for trying it. That would be a lot of work. Certainly would give you an appreciation of how it was not all that long ago. We take so much for granted, but we benefit from the combined efforts of so many people before us.

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Re: Gardening 2019

#67

Post by Whatever4 » Wed Jul 10, 2019 1:59 pm

Maybenaut wrote:
Mon Jul 08, 2019 9:23 pm
p0rtia wrote:
Mon Jul 08, 2019 7:29 pm

I'm in the woods too, and yes, the water is yeller from the leaves above the roof. But that's okay for the garden. I have a fancy filter for the kitchen sink water, but it is still yeller and I don't use it for drinking water (wouldn't want to ask guests to drink it). And I haul in shower water (I used rain water at first, but it is not clean enough, and I started to get itchy!). Have a guest coming in at the end of the month--I'll be hauling extra water for that, but it's close and I'm used to doing chores.

Reminds you of where our species came from when you live off-grid.
Your place sounds awesome! Anyhoo, we use our place year 'round, although I have to say I'm not as enamored of it as I used to be since I got that f'in tick bite.

But it was a lot of fun solving all of these problems. We ended up with the cistern because the county health guy said getting decent water in our part of the Blue Ridge is a crapshoot, and you could spend $5K and get 10 gallons a minute of the sweetest, purest water you could hope for, or spend $20K and get sludge, and there's no way to tell. Our neighbor has a well, and she said her water is really sulphury. I'm good with the cistern. It's not that expensive to have it delivered, and we are very conservative (when we were hauling it from home we learned to be careful with it).

When we finally got the cistern and plumbed the place for realz, we left all of the temporary plumbing in place but capped off so if we have to shift back to external tanks (like when the water guy's truck broke down), we can do it easily.
What do you do for sewerage?
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Re: Gardening 2019

#68

Post by Maybenaut » Wed Jul 10, 2019 2:53 pm

Whatever4 wrote:
Wed Jul 10, 2019 1:59 pm


What do you do for sewerage?
We have a septic system. The place was built in 1968, and abandoned in 1984. I called the county health department when we bought the place, and he said there was a septic letter on file. He said to go ahead and use the system; if it had problems, we'd find out about them soon enough. And we did -- we could see that there was a leak in the driveway in the line running from the tank to the field. We had the septic guy out, and they said the tank and the line needed to be replaced (the tank leaked and the line wasn't to code). Until we could get that fixed, we peed in the woods and made a poo run into town a couple of times a day (we're always going to town anyway, so it wasn't a big deal). We couldn't get the septic fixed until we got a road, though, and that took forever ($30K was a lot of money to us, but it's not a lot of money to a road contractor, so it was hard to find someone to do the work because it wasn't a big enough job). Now, of course, we have a perfectly-functioning septic system (but we still encourage peeing in the woods for the guys because it saves water).

Overall, though, sewage hasn't been as big of a problem for us as groundwater has been.

While the septic tank needed to be replaced (and relocated), the septic field itself was still in pretty good condition, not having been used very much. But the new septic line gave us the perfect opportunity to fix the ground-water problem, which was this: steep hillside, flat spot with cabin, followed by more steep hillside -- the ground water ran down off the hillside behind the cabin in sheets just below the surface, and just pooled there; you'd sink up to your knees in mud if you walked out the back door. We dug two french drains ourselves -- one immediately adjacent to and running the length of the rear of the cabin, and another one behind the cabin at the base of the hillside; they emptied into a french drain running down the left hand side of the cabin (it worked, but we still had a lot of water on right hand side). The road contractor dug a new trench for the new septic line down the right hand side of the cabin, but he dug it deep enough to accommodate a french drain under the new septic line (and we connected the drains we dug to that), and turned the french drain away from the septic field so the ground water didn't flood the septic field. So now we have water running off both side, and the back has fully dried out.
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Re: Gardening 2019

#69

Post by MsDaisy » Wed Jul 10, 2019 10:47 pm

While rescuing a little frog from the pool and releasing it down in the pond I can see clearly (no pun intended) why my damn eyes have been itching me to death recently…
Grass pollen.jpg
Grass pollen… Yay

But the good news is the baby Black Vultures down in the old barn have fledged
Baby Black Vultures .jpg
And the other good news is that this has become the year of the sunflower and they are everywhere around the house.

A gardening tip I learned a long time ago, what you want to grow is irrelevant, but what wants to grow will grow. Sunflowers love it here and they self generate every year! Well some do, so I dig them up from the grass and put them back in the gardens as I find them sprouting.. And they’re wonderful! :blink:
Sunflowers.jpg
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Re: Gardening 2019

#70

Post by Azastan » Wed Jul 10, 2019 10:51 pm

MsDaisy wrote:
Wed Jul 10, 2019 10:47 pm


But the good news is the baby Black Vultures down in the old barn have fledged
Baby Black Vultures .jpg


Oh, you are so fortunate to have little baby Black Vultures!

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Re: Gardening 2019

#71

Post by RVInit » Thu Jul 11, 2019 6:50 am

Thanks for sharing, Ms Daisy! I enjoyed your post this morning, nice way to start the day.
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Re: Gardening 2019

#72

Post by Bill_G » Mon Jul 15, 2019 8:12 am

A reminder to you home gardeners:
When picking green beans, the Jeffery Epstein rules apply - pick them young and often.

:rimshot:

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Re: Gardening 2019

#73

Post by DejaMoo » Mon Jul 15, 2019 8:59 am

A week ago I planted bush green beans and Oregon Sugar Pod peas in the top row of my new raised bed. Since it's too late in the season to transplant the phlox into that, I figured, make use of the space. I'll have beans and peas in September.

My mom was given one of those large patio tomato plants for Mother's Day. I planted it in the vegetable bed along with a seedling tomato plant. The size difference between the two plants initially looked ridiculous. But within two weeks the seedling tomato had made huge strides, and it quickly caught up to the patio tomato.

I have two Telegraph english cucumbers in the vegetable bed; so far they're blooming lightly, but no fruit set yet. The picklers are setting fruit, but they're still too small to pick. I had to satisfy my fresh cuke cravings at the farmer's market.

I added topsoil near the south side of the house to fill in a low stretch of ground. I planted it all in white clover. The pocket bunnies (tiny baby bunnies) are loving the clover. This is my deal with the rabbits: I provide clover, you keep out of my gardens.
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Re: Gardening 2019

#74

Post by p0rtia » Mon Jul 15, 2019 9:53 am

Bill_G wrote:
Wed Jul 10, 2019 8:35 am
It's just so hard to imagine there are places in upstate NY that don't have running water. It's seems anachronistic. But, bravo for you for trying it. That would be a lot of work. Certainly would give you an appreciation of how it was not all that long ago. We take so much for granted, but we benefit from the combined efforts of so many people before us.
My choice. I built the cabin /caused it to be built to my specs, for a three-season retreat. 12 x 20 ft. My goal was to have as little impact on the immediate environment as possible. It is on skids so technically it is a portable structure. My goal was to have as little impact on the immediate environment as possible. Yes, I have chores that must be done. It does keep me grounded.

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Re: Gardening 2019

#75

Post by Whatever4 » Mon Jul 15, 2019 10:11 am

Can you sketch a floor plan for us? :daydream:
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