Gardening 2018

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kate520
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Re: Gardening 2018

#51

Post by kate520 » Fri Apr 27, 2018 5:20 pm

Holy cow, P0rtia, that’s a big caladium!


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Re: Gardening 2018

#52

Post by p0rtia » Fri Apr 27, 2018 6:34 pm

Bill_G wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 4:54 pm
I like the iris imitating an orchid Portia. Beautiful. Thank you. My columbine are starting to bloom. I should post some pictures.
Isn't it beautiful? I am no photographer, but lucked out with the lighting on that one. :-D


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Re: Gardening 2018

#53

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:37 pm

Those plant are GORGEOUS. Is the iris a Japanese iris?


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Re: Gardening 2018

#54

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:58 pm

Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:37 pm
Those plant are GORGEOUS. Is the iris a Japanese iris?
It looks like a walking iris to me.



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Re: Gardening 2018

#55

Post by maydijo » Fri Apr 27, 2018 9:49 pm

Sugar Magnolia wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:58 pm
Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:37 pm
Those plant are GORGEOUS. Is the iris a Japanese iris?
It looks like a walking iris to me.
Oh no! The revolution has began! Sorry, folks, I'd better go hide, if the irises are walking it won't be long before the rest of the plants follow suit . . .



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Re: Gardening 2018

#56

Post by RVInit » Sun Apr 29, 2018 7:37 pm

OK, all this talk about gardening got me inspired. I bought some pots and herbs yesterday and they are out on the patio. Oregano, rosemary, chocolate mint, lemon verbena, sage, and thyme. So far. I found some really cute pots at the local Ace hardware store - colorful pots with stylized graphics - dragonflies, butterflies, flowers/paisley, and hummingbirds. I will take some photos and upload, maybe tomorrow. Got to finish my laundry now.


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Re: Gardening 2018

#57

Post by p0rtia » Sun Apr 29, 2018 7:54 pm

Sugar Magnolia wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:58 pm
Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:37 pm
Those plant are GORGEOUS. Is the iris a Japanese iris?
It looks like a walking iris to me.
They were here when I bought the place 3 years ago. I tagged them as African Iris, but was never really happy with the identification. But Yellow Walking Iris seems right on the mark, maybe Trimezia steyermarkii. Yeah! Thanks, Sug! Here's a gardenia for ya. In previous years I was lucky to get three or four blooms. But tender loving care is working, and I have dozens of blooms this year. Sooo sweet!

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Re: Gardening 2018

#58

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Sun Apr 29, 2018 8:16 pm

p0rtia wrote:
Sun Apr 29, 2018 7:54 pm
Sugar Magnolia wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:58 pm
Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:37 pm
Those plant are GORGEOUS. Is the iris a Japanese iris?
It looks like a walking iris to me.
They were here when I bought the place 3 years ago. I tagged them as African Iris, but was never really happy with the identification. But Yellow Walking Iris seems right on the mark, maybe Trimezia steyermarkii. Yeah! Thanks, Sug! Here's a gardenia for ya. In previous years I was lucky to get three or four blooms. But tender loving care is working, and I have dozens of blooms this year. Sooo sweet!

Image
How did you know gardenias are one of my favorites? My dwarf gardenias are absolutely loaded with buds, but so far no blooms yet. I'm hoping they actually bloom though because of the weather. The Japanese magnolia was loaded with buds too but only had a few blooms. None of us fared well through the 2018 Ice Age it seems.

They should bloom next week if they're going to. The ones in New Orleans are just now opening this week.



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Re: Gardening 2018

#59

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Sun Apr 29, 2018 8:32 pm

Portia's gardenias smell good!


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Re: Gardening 2018

#60

Post by kate520 » Mon Apr 30, 2018 2:28 am

The Matillija poppies are starting to bloom. I started two years ago with one 4’ High shrub.

Got seeds for melons, will plant them tomorrow. Two kinds Watermelons, honeydew, and muskmelon. Last year I put 2 blueberry cultivars for hot SoCal in pots and was munching berries all summer. They’re doing well too, coming back strong.

My latest obsession is euphorbias. It’s wild how many different shapes are in this South African family. I have a couple of Medusa’s Heads, Tiny Tim, a bunch of Sticks on Fire, Trigona, ghost. They enjoy being in bed with roses. A Crown of Thorns Tree is a euphorbia. Many botanical gardens have them.

Pictures tomorrow.


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Re: Gardening 2018

#61

Post by Mr Brolin » Mon Apr 30, 2018 9:50 am

For reasons which constantly elude me, one has

1. A garden
2. A man who gardens pour moi

And yet I still end up shifting mud from point A to point B on a far too regular basis than is good for a gentleman or one with my general aversion to manual labor.....

This weekend, much fine, misty, cold rain, sufficient for general misery yet insufficient to argue the case for a day or two indoors, catching up on box sets, baking a rather pleasant chocolate drizzled apple-cinnamon bundt cake or sampling from a pleasant selection of single malts.

As such I spent the weekend, against my better judgement

A. Planting two new cherry trees, one columnar, one weeping in the unforgiving, albeit fertile, clay soil
B. Replanting two ornamental (and functional) standard bay tree's out the front
C. Cutting out and double digging a new 30' curvilinear bed and border in the shady section of garden for planting next week
D. Turning over the two compost box's (a month to go I estimate for brown gold)

This was followed by much whining and self medication of the liquid variety after one realised that one is no longer ANYTHING like as young as one used to be.

It didn't help that my (partially) whimsical suggestion that it wouldn't take too long to whip up a few small linear cratering charges that would open up the new border nicely was shot down quite firmly.

Still, for a gentleman gardener, the trip over to London and the RHS Chelsea Flower Show next month will undoubtedly bear fruit (excuse the pun) although the Rock Bank restaurant will certainly consume (again apologies for the pun) a not inconsiderable amount of time.....



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Re: Gardening 2018

#62

Post by RVInit » Mon Apr 30, 2018 10:02 am

When I was doing serious gardening I had two compost tumblers. I loved them, they were really easy on the back. And while one was cooking I would be feeding the other one. I also had a worm composter that I kept out in the Florida room that was air conditioned. It was pretty shady out there so it didn't get too hot for the worms. I highly recommend the worm bins if you have a place to keep them from freezing or getting too hot, but be careful about using worms that are not invasive species. If you are still getting a traditional newspaper it's a great way to recycle it and there are lots of online sources for setting up and maintaining them. Composting is good. :thumbs:


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Re: Gardening 2018

#63

Post by Azastan » Mon Apr 30, 2018 10:32 am

Mr Brolin wrote:
Mon Apr 30, 2018 9:50 am


Still, for a gentleman gardener, the trip over to London and the RHS Chelsea Flower Show next month will undoubtedly bear fruit (excuse the pun) although the Rock Bank restaurant will certainly consume (again apologies for the pun) a not inconsiderable amount of time.....
To be in England for the Chelsea Flower Show!

Double digging is a tremendous amount of work. Kudos to you for having the fortitude to perform it.



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Re: Gardening 2018

#64

Post by RVInit » Mon Apr 30, 2018 10:37 am

Azastan wrote:
Mon Apr 30, 2018 10:32 am
Mr Brolin wrote:
Mon Apr 30, 2018 9:50 am


Still, for a gentleman gardener, the trip over to London and the RHS Chelsea Flower Show next month will undoubtedly bear fruit (excuse the pun) although the Rock Bank restaurant will certainly consume (again apologies for the pun) a not inconsiderable amount of time.....
To be in England for the Chelsea Flower Show!

Double digging is a tremendous amount of work. Kudos to you for having the fortitude to perform it.
:thumbs: on both counts. I would love to see that flower show! I've seen it in photos and video and wow. Also double digging. Yeah, that's serious work, and it pays off.


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Re: Gardening 2018

#65

Post by Mr Brolin » Mon Apr 30, 2018 10:40 am

Double digging....hence the strip charges musing......never again.....back is now in small, crumbly pieces akin to vermiculite and alpine potting mix...... :crying:



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Re: Gardening 2018

#66

Post by Mr Brolin » Mon Apr 30, 2018 10:46 am

I wanted to buy THIS in 2015......

Was told...."No...!"

Image

https://www.demilked.com/sculptures-dri ... oran-webb/



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Re: Gardening 2018

#67

Post by Mr Brolin » Mon Apr 30, 2018 10:56 am

A thoroughly enjoyable long weekend garden thingie related can be had at the Savannah, Homes and Garden tour, usually end of March each year.

Last time I did this I stayed at the Hamilton-Turner Inn, bed and breakfast, thoroughly recommend.....

It's usually 2 weeks after St Patricks Day which is suprisingly huge..... if you want to see wildlife pre perusing genteel foliage..... :rotflmao:



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Re: Gardening 2018

#68

Post by RVInit » Mon Apr 30, 2018 11:19 am

My favorite garden tours are native garden tours. I especially love bringing gardeners who haven't done native species gardening because it really opens their eyes to how unbelievably beautiful (and easy) native gardening can be. I really feel like I did a disservice in not mentioning this to Addie - please, please, please take some time to visit a native plant club meeting or try to find a local nursery that advertises native plants. Native plants are plants that already naturally conditioned to your specific location. Unfortunately they can be harder to find, but once you hook up with native plant enthusiasts, they will give you cuttings, share sources, and usually have plants for sale or raffle at every meeting. And the beauty of it is that native plants don't require anything special. They do need a "watering in" period to get them established, but, once they are in you basically leave them alone and they naturally thrive. They generally cost less than the non-native species, too, at least here in Florida that is true.

I had a neighbor that once called me over to the fence to ask me if I knew why she sat out in her back yard every afternoon. When I admitted that I didn't know she told me she sat in her back yard because she was enjoying MY back yard. The butterflies, bees collecting pollen, birds eating seeds and bathing - she said she had no idea this kind of thing could actually happen in someone's back yard. She thought you had to go hiking in the woods to witness this kind of wildlife activity. I helped her get started with native plants and soon she was watching the bees, butterflies, and birds going back and forth between our properties and she was tickled pink about it. She had never gardened before and was surprised how easy it is to have a gorgeous native oasis right in your own back yard. Native wildlife use native plants naturally, and will be drawn to those plants more often than you will see them using the non-native species as long as they are available. And don't think that you have to let it grow "wild". You can do anything with native species that can be done with non-natives. If you like a formal looking garden, then plant it that way. If you prefer something more loose, plant it that way. There are no rules about how to arrange native plants. Some people immediately think that a native garden means it has to look completely wild and unkempt, but that may be because that is all they have ever seen.


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Re: Gardening 2018

#69

Post by Bill_G » Mon Apr 30, 2018 11:20 am

Mr Brolin wrote:
Mon Apr 30, 2018 10:46 am
I wanted to buy THIS in 2015......

Was told...."No...!"

Image

https://www.demilked.com/sculptures-dri ... oran-webb/
I would have said yes, but with some hesitation, and perhaps a caveat, or two.



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Re: Gardening 2018

#70

Post by kate520 » Mon Apr 30, 2018 11:24 am

I'da bought that, Mr. Brolin. Everyone needs a garden dragon, and what a magnificent specimen!


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Re: Gardening 2018

#71

Post by kate520 » Mon Apr 30, 2018 11:29 am

I have so much to do right now that isn't gardening, but this window is the most important thing. Get the plants in NOW, turnthesoilNOW, start the seeds, catch the bugs. All NOW!

:roll: Plants are so demanding.


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Re: Gardening 2018

#72

Post by DejaMoo » Fri May 04, 2018 10:55 am

I just had all the pavers and materials delivered for my patio rebuild. I'm re-laying my large patio and will also be putting a large gazebo on it. This calls for a complete re-imagining of my back yard's layout.

Thanks to the prolonged winter weather, we are at least two weeks behind our typical season, so this photo is from about this time last year. She's actually a fountain, and I'm debating whether to keep her under the pagoda dogwood or to build a reflecting pool for her.
Lady Fountain1.jpg
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Re: Gardening 2018

#73

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Fri May 04, 2018 10:59 am

So glad you named that tree! We have some and I didn't know what they were! I am behind on my flower gardening too also.


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Re: Gardening 2018

#74

Post by RVInit » Fri May 04, 2018 12:20 pm

DejaMoo wrote:
Fri May 04, 2018 10:55 am
I just had all the pavers and materials delivered for my patio rebuild. I'm re-laying my large patio and will also be putting a large gazebo on it. This calls for a complete re-imagining of my back yard's layout.

Thanks to the prolonged winter weather, we are at least two weeks behind our typical season, so this photo is from about this time last year. She's actually a fountain, and I'm debating whether to keep her under the pagoda dogwood or to build a reflecting pool for her.

Lady Fountain1.jpg
Wow, that is some kind of beautiful - the tree, statue, everything. :lovestruck:


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Re: Gardening 2018

#75

Post by Bill_G » Tue May 08, 2018 10:10 pm

Super day here. Mild weather. Clear skies. Cool temps. Absolutely perfect. Some snaps of the front beds.

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