Today in history

noblepa
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Re: Today in history

#51

Post by noblepa » Fri Aug 17, 2018 12:26 pm

Should've posted this yesterday.

Aug. 16, 2018 was the 41st anniversary of the death of Elvis Presley.

Is there any cosmic significance to the fact that the King of Rock and Roll and the Queen of Soul passed away on the same date?



Add Aretha to that list. The band just got a little bit better.

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Dan1100
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Re: Today in history

#52

Post by Dan1100 » Sat Aug 18, 2018 4:29 pm

One year ago today, Steve Bannon was fired from the Whitehouse for getting drunk and pooping in his office trashcan.

It was a kinder, simpler time.

http://www.thefogbow.com/forum/viewtopi ... on#p907794
"Devin Nunes is having a cow over this."

-George Takei

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Re: Today in history

#53

Post by AndyinPA » Sat Aug 18, 2018 5:32 pm

Yeah, but based on the Ari Melber interview last night (I didn't watch it), he's back. :crying:

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RTH10260
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Re: Today in history

#54

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Aug 19, 2018 2:53 pm

Eisenhower approves coup in Iran, Aug. 19, 1953
By ANDREW GLASS 08/19/2018 07:29 AM EDT

Reversing earlier U.S. policy, President Dwight D. Eisenhower authorized the CIA to instigate a coup d'état in Tehran that led to the overthrow of Iranian Prime Minister Mohammed Mosaddeq and his government on this day in 1953. The political, economic and social consequences of Mosaddeq's removal from power has had a profound impact on Iran-U.S. relations — one which manifests itself in the region to this day.

A previously excised section of an internal CIA history titled “The Battle for Iran“ released in 2013, reads: “The military coup that overthrew Mosaddeq and his National Front cabinet was carried out under CIA direction as an act of U.S. foreign policy, conceived and approved at the highest levels of government.”

The documents, published on the agency’s archival website under freedom of information protocols, describe in detail how the United States — with British help — engineered the coup, codenamed TPAJAX by the CIA and Operation Boot by Britain’s MI6.

Anthony Eden, the British foreign secretary, regarded Mosaddeq as a threat to Western strategic and economic interests after the Iranian leader nationalized the British Anglo-Iranian Oil Co., known today as BP.

CIA supporters maintain that the coup was strategically necessary. Critics have asserted that the scheme was illegal, paranoid and immoral. In 2000, Madeleine Albright, the secretary of state, noted that the “Eisenhower administration believed its actions were justified for strategic reasons.” But, she added, “the coup was clearly a setback for Iran’s political development and it is easy to see now why many Iranians continue to resent this intervention by America.”


https://www.politico.com/story/2018/08/ ... 953-788012

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Re: Today in history

#55

Post by AndyinPA » Sun Aug 19, 2018 8:27 pm

Well, we all know how well that went! :cry:

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Re: Today in history

#56

Post by sad-cafe » Sun Aug 19, 2018 9:47 pm

Just wanted to say thank you for inspiring me in my classroom.

Every morning for their bell work I post a This Day in History about something in the past, I also make 4 grammar mistakes they have to write the sentence and correct it before I start teaching.

I have up to Jan done.

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Re: Today in history

#57

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Aug 20, 2018 10:57 pm

August 21, 1968
Soviets Invade Czechoslovakia

On the night of August 20, 1968, approximately 200,000 Warsaw Pact troops and 5,000 tanks invade Czechoslovakia to crush the “Prague Spring”–a brief period of liberalization in the communist country. Czechoslovakians protested the invasion with public demonstrations and other non-violent tactics, but they were no match for the Soviet tanks. The liberal reforms of First Secretary Alexander Dubcek were repealed and “normalization” began under his successor Gustav Husak.

Pro-Soviet communists seized control of Czechoslovakia’s democratic government in 1948. Soviet leader Joseph Stalin imposed his will on Czechoslovakia’s communist leaders, and the country was run as a Stalinist state until 1964, when a gradual trend toward liberalization began. However, modest economic reform was not enough for many Czechoslovakians, and beginning in 1966 students and intellectuals began to agitate for changes to education and an end to censorship. First Secretary Antonin Novotny’s problems were made worse by opposition from Slovakian leaders, among them Alexander Dubcek and Gustav Husak, who accused the central government of being dominated by Czechs.

In January 1968, Novotny was replaced as first secretary by Alexander Dubcek, who was unanimously elected by the Czechoslovakian Central Committee. To secure his power base, Dubcek appealed to the public to voice support for his proposed reforms. The response was overwhelming, and Czech and Slovak reformers took over the communist leadership.

In April, the new leadership unveiled its “Action Program,” promising democratic elections, greater autonomy for Slovakia, freedom of speech and religion, the abolition of censorship, an end to restrictions on travel, and major industrial and agricultural reforms. Dubcek declared that he was offering “socialism with a human face.” The Czechoslovakian public greeted the reforms joyously, and Czechoslovakia’s long stagnant national culture began to bloom during what became known as the Prague Spring. In late June, a popular petition called the “Two Thousand Words” was published calling for even more rapid progress to full democracy. The Soviet Union and its satellites Poland and East Germany were alarmed by what appeared to be the imminent collapse of communism in Czechoslovakia.



https://www.history.com/this-day-in-his ... hoslovakia

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Re: Today in history

#58

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Aug 23, 2018 7:26 pm

Back in June we missed this:

20 years since Windows 98 released to market
Windows 98

Windows 98 (codenamed Memphis[3] while in development) is a graphical operating system by Microsoft. It is the second major release in the Windows 9x line of operating systems and the successor to Windows 95. It was released to manufacturing on May 15, 1998 and to retail on June 25, 1998.


Released to manufacturing May 15, 1998; 20 years ago
General availability June 25, 1998; 20 years ago
Latest release Second Edition (4.10.2222 A) / May 5, 1999; 19 years ago[1]2
Mainstream support ended on June 30, 2002[2]
Extended support ended on July 11, 2006[2]


Like its predecessor, Windows 98 is a hybrid 16-bit and 32-bit[4] monolithic product with the boot stage based on MS-DOS.[5] Windows 98 was succeeded by Windows 98 Second Edition (SE) on May 5, 1999,[6] which in turn was succeeded by Windows ME on September 14, 2000.[7] Microsoft ended mainstream support for Windows 98 and 98 SE on June 30, 2002, and extended support on July 11, 2006.[2]

The startup sound for Windows 98 was composed by Microsoft sound engineer Ken Kato, who considered it to be a "tough act to follow".[8]
h/t Wikipedia https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_98

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Re: Today in history

#59

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Aug 28, 2018 8:04 pm

August 28, 1988 -- Ramstein Germany

USConsulateFrankfurt @usconsfrankfurt
30 years ago, a tragic incident during an air show at the #Ramstein Air Base, Germany caused 70 fatalities and injuries to some 1,000 people. We commemorate the victims of this catastrophe.

09:06 - 28 Aug 2018

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Re: Today in history

#60

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Aug 28, 2018 11:07 pm

Fifty years later, Illinoisans recall the Chicago riots

By Bernard Schoenburg of Gatehouse Media Illinois
Posted Aug 26, 2018 at 5:19 PM
Updated Aug 26, 2018 at 8:46 PM

SPRINGFIELD — Dennis McMurray remembers getting to Chicago in 1968, where the Democratic Party was to choose its nominee for president in that tumultuous year.

“I remember all kinds of huge banners: ‘Mayor Richard J. Daley welcomes you to the Democratic National Convention,’ ” McMurray, 71, of Springfield recalled in a recent interview.

McMurray was invited to Chicago by a history professor he had at Luther College in Iowa, David Brye, who was also a delegate for presidential candidate Eugene McCarthy.

“I can’t get you into the convention center,” he recalled Brye telling him. “But you could hang out, and it would be exciting and ... you’ll see history in the making.”

That was an understatement.

The convention was 50 years ago — Aug. 26-29 at the old International Amphitheater — and it came at a troubled time in America. The Vietnam War was raging, and young men were still being drafted into military service.


http://www.pjstar.com/news/20180826/fif ... cago-riots

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Re: Today in history

#61

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Sep 03, 2018 8:23 am

Google Chrome: 10 years of surfing the web

When Google Chrome was released on September 2, 2008, it was just one more browser competing with Internet Explorer and the six-year old Mozilla Firefox.

Fast forward 10 years and Chrome controls a commanding 66% of the desktop browser market, with Firefox--its next closest competitor--only holding 11%.

In honor of the 10th anniversary of Chrome, let's take a look back at major milestones in the life of Google's iconic browser.


https://www.techrepublic.com/pictures/p ... le-chrome/

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RTH10260
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Re: Today in history

#62

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Sep 04, 2018 10:29 pm

Google founded on Sept. 4, 1998.
20 Years Of Google Has Changed the Way We Think. Here's How, According to a Historian of Information

By LILY ROTHMAN September 4, 2018

It might sound obvious to say that Google has changed the world in the 20 years since it was founded on Sept. 4, 1998. Google, and its parent company Alphabet, is involved in everything from the development of driverless cars to disputes with President Donald Trump.

But, to James W. Cortada, author of All the Facts: A History of Information in the United States since 1870, there are also lots of ways in which Google, as the dominant search engine, hasn’t really changed anything. In the scheme of the whole history of people searching for information, its has merely continued many trends that have been happening for centuries.


http://time.com/5383389/google-history- ... formation/

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Re: Today in history

#63

Post by noblepa » Tue Sep 04, 2018 11:57 pm

RTH10260 wrote:
Mon Sep 03, 2018 8:23 am
Google Chrome: 10 years of surfing the web

When Google Chrome was released on September 2, 2008, it was just one more browser competing with Internet Explorer and the six-year old Mozilla Firefox.

Fast forward 10 years and Chrome controls a commanding 66% of the desktop browser market, with Firefox--its next closest competitor--only holding 11%.

In honor of the 10th anniversary of Chrome, let's take a look back at major milestones in the life of Google's iconic browser.


https://www.techrepublic.com/pictures/p ... le-chrome/

I suspect that Chrome sits on so many desktops because, every time Adobe releases a new version of Acrobat reader (which seems to be every other week), the download dialog is pre-loaded with the boxes checked to download Chrome and the Google taskbar. If you don't remember to uncheck the boxes, it will automatically download Chrome. I find this extremely annoying.

I'm not all that sure that 66% of computer users actually USE Chrome, just thet they were tricked into downloading it. I may be wrong.

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Re: Today in history

#64

Post by MRich » Thu Sep 06, 2018 12:53 pm

noblepa wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 11:57 pm
I'm not all that sure that 66% of computer users actually USE Chrome, just thet they were tricked into downloading it. I may be wrong.
I use Firefox for almost everything, but I use Chrome for Fogbow. I find that when a page with a lot of attachments and links opens up with Firefox, the screen hops around when the page is loading, and it never seems to end up on the "first unread post".

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Re: Today in history

#65

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Sep 21, 2018 11:05 pm

not exactly to date, but September 1918 ...
Remembering the 1918 Influenza Pandemic

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the 1918 influenza (flu) pandemic that swept the globe in what is still one of the deadliest disease outbreaks in recorded history.

It is estimated that about 500 million people or one-third of the world’s population became infected with this virus, and the number of deaths was estimated to be at least 50 million worldwide with about 675,000 occurring in the United States. The pandemic was so severe that from 1917 to 1918, life expectancy in the United States fell by about 12 years, to 36.6 years for men and 42.2 years for women. There were high death rates in previously healthy people, including those between the ages of 20 and 40 years old, which was unusual because flu typically hits the very young and the very old more than young adults.

The 1918 flu pandemic is sometimes called “The Spanish Flu” not because it originated in Spain, but because that nation had remained neutral during the war and freely reported news of flu activity.

The Emerging Pandemic

The 1918 flu pandemic occurred during World War I; close quarters and massive troop movements helped fuel the spread of disease.

In the United States, unusual flu activity was first detected in military camps and some cities during the spring of 1918. For the U.S. and other countries involved in the war, communications about the severity and spread of disease was kept quiet as officials were concerned about keeping up public morale, and not giving away information about illness among soldiers during wartime. These spring outbreaks are now considered a “first wave” of the pandemic; illness was limited and much milder than would be observed during the two waves that followed.

Deadly Second Wave and Third Waves

In September 1918, the second wave of pandemic flu emerged at Camp Devens, a U.S. Army training camp just outside of Boston, and at a naval facility in Boston. This wave was brutal and peaked in the U.S. from September through November. More than 100,000 Americans died during October alone. The third and final wave began in early 1919 and ran through spring, causing yet more illness and death. While serious, this wave was not as lethal as the second wave. The flu pandemic in the U.S. finally subsided in the summer of 1919, leaving decimated families and communities to pick up the pieces. Scientists now know this pandemic was caused by an H1N1 virus, which continued to circulate as a seasonal virus worldwide for the next 38 years.


https://www.cdc.gov/features/1918-flu-p ... index.html

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Re: Today in history

#66

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Oct 01, 2018 11:07 am

60 years of NASA
NASA's 60th Anniversary Puts Its History Office in the Spotlight
By Meghan Bartels, Space.com Senior Writer | October 1, 2018 07:15am ET

NASA turns 60 years old today (Oct. 1), and while the agency has been particularly focused on its past in anticipation of the big milestone, that's business as usual for a little-known office within NASA.

In fact, NASA's history office is just a few months younger than the agency itself and was created to help the agency share its work with the public. It's one of many such offices within the federal government, albeit perhaps one with the most engaging history to curate.

"The history office is one of the low-priced gems that exist in the federal government," Roger Launius, who was chief historian at NASA from 1990 to 2002, told Space.com. "This is a part of our heritage as a nation and we should be properly proud of it and use it in good ways."


https://www.space.com/41976-nasa-histor ... ctive.html

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Re: Today in history

#67

Post by Chilidog » Mon Oct 01, 2018 3:37 pm

RTH10260 wrote:
Fri Sep 21, 2018 11:05 pm
not exactly to date, but September 1918 ...
Remembering the 1918 Influenza Pandemic

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the 1918 influenza (flu) pandemic that swept the globe in what is still one of the deadliest disease outbreaks in recorded history.

It is estimated that about 500 million people or one-third of the world’s population became infected with this virus, and the number of deaths was estimated to be at least 50 million worldwide with about 675,000 occurring in the United States. The pandemic was so severe that from 1917 to 1918, life expectancy in the United States fell by about 12 years, to 36.6 years for men and 42.2 years for women. There were high death rates in previously healthy people, including those between the ages of 20 and 40 years old, which was unusual because flu typically hits the very young and the very old more than young adults.

The 1918 flu pandemic is sometimes called “The Spanish Flu” not because it originated in Spain, but because that nation had remained neutral during the war and freely reported news of flu activity.

The Emerging Pandemic

The 1918 flu pandemic occurred during World War I; close quarters and massive troop movements helped fuel the spread of disease.

In the United States, unusual flu activity was first detected in military camps and some cities during the spring of 1918. For the U.S. and other countries involved in the war, communications about the severity and spread of disease was kept quiet as officials were concerned about keeping up public morale, and not giving away information about illness among soldiers during wartime. These spring outbreaks are now considered a “first wave” of the pandemic; illness was limited and much milder than would be observed during the two waves that followed.

Deadly Second Wave and Third Waves

In September 1918, the second wave of pandemic flu emerged at Camp Devens, a U.S. Army training camp just outside of Boston, and at a naval facility in Boston. This wave was brutal and peaked in the U.S. from September through November. More than 100,000 Americans died during October alone. The third and final wave began in early 1919 and ran through spring, causing yet more illness and death. While serious, this wave was not as lethal as the second wave. The flu pandemic in the U.S. finally subsided in the summer of 1919, leaving decimated families and communities to pick up the pieces. Scientists now know this pandemic was caused by an H1N1 virus, which continued to circulate as a seasonal virus worldwide for the next 38 years.


https://www.cdc.gov/features/1918-flu-p ... index.html
I have a great aunt who contracted the disease but survived. Unfortunately, its affects were long lasting and may have contributed to her early death at 52.

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Re: Today in history

#68

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Oct 01, 2018 11:49 pm

110 years of Ford - The Model T
August 1908: The First Ford Model T Completed in Detroit
It wasn’t the first car, by any means. But it was the first car that really mattered
By Vaclav Smil

In 1908, Henry Ford had been working in the auto business for more than a decade, and the Ford Motor Co., five years old and already profitable, had so far followed its peers by catering to the well-to-do. Its Model K, introduced in 1906, was priced at around US $2,800, and the smaller Model N, introduced the same year, sold for $500—about what the average person earned in a year.

Then, on 12 August 1908, the age of the automobile began, because on that day the first Ford Model T was assembled at Detroit’s Piquette Avenue Plant. It went on sale on 1 October.



https://spectrum.ieee.org/transportatio ... in-detroit

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Re: Today in history

#69

Post by RTH10260 » Sat Nov 10, 2018 12:02 am

80 years ago

Nazi-Germany - Reichskristallnacht - 9–10 November 1938

excerpt from Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kristallnacht
Kristallnacht (German pronunciation: [kʁɪsˈtalnaχt]; lit. "Crystal Night") or Reichskristallnacht (German: [ˌʁaɪçs.kʁɪsˈtalnaχt] (About this sound listen)), also referred to as the Night of Broken Glass, Reichspogromnacht [ˌʁaɪçs.poˈɡʁoːmnaχt] or simply Pogromnacht [poˈɡʁoːmnaχt] (About this sound listen), and Novemberpogrome [noˈvɛmbɐpoɡʁoːmə] (About this sound listen) (Yiddish: קרישטאָל נאַכט krishtol nakht), was a pogrom against Jews throughout Nazi Germany on 9–10 November 1938, carried out by SA paramilitary forces and German civilians. The German authorities looked on without intervening.[1][2] The name Kristallnacht comes from the shards of broken glass that littered the streets after the windows of Jewish-owned stores, buildings, and synagogues were smashed.

Estimates of the number of fatalities caused by the pogrom have varied. Early reports estimated that 91 Jews were murdered during the attacks.[3] Modern analysis of German scholarly sources by historians such as Sir Richard Evans puts the number much higher. When deaths from post-arrest maltreatment and subsequent suicides are included, the death toll climbs into the hundreds. Additionally, 30,000 Jewish men were arrested and incarcerated in concentration camps.[3]

Jewish homes, hospitals, and schools were ransacked, as the attackers demolished buildings with sledgehammers.[4] The rioters destroyed 267 synagogues throughout Germany, Austria, and the Sudetenland,[5] and over 7,000 Jewish businesses were either destroyed or damaged.[6][7] The British historian Martin Gilbert wrote that no event in the history of German Jews between 1933 and 1945 was so widely reported as it was happening, and the accounts from the foreign journalists working in Germany sent shock waves around the world.[4] The British newspaper The Times wrote at the time: "No foreign propagandist bent upon blackening Germany before the world could outdo the tale of burnings and beatings, of blackguardly assaults on defenseless and innocent people, which disgraced that country yesterday."[8]

The attacks were retaliation for the assassination of the Nazi[9] German diplomat Ernst vom Rath by Herschel Grynszpan, a seventeen-year-old German-born Polish Jew living in Paris. Kristallnacht was followed by additional economic and political persecution of Jews, and it is viewed by historians as part of Nazi Germany's broader racial policy, and the beginning of the Final Solution and The Holocaust.[10]

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Re: Today in history

#70

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Nov 18, 2018 6:19 pm

40 years ago
An apocalyptic cult, 900 dead: remembering the Jonestown massacre, 40 years on

More than 900 people, many of them children, died in a mass murder-suicide in 1978 by drinking cyanide-laced punch at the order of cult leader Jim Jones

J Oliver Conroy
Sat 17 Nov 2018 09.00 GMT Last modified on Sun 18 Nov 2018 21.48 GMT

Four decades ago this Sunday, the Rev Jim Jones, the charismatic leader of an American cult in the Guyanese jungle, ordered his followers to murder a US congressman and several journalists, then commit mass suicide by drinking cyanide-laced fruit punch.

The Jonestown massacre was, before 9/11, the largest single incident of intentional civilian death in American history. More than 900 people died, many children. It was also a devastating cultural trauma: the end of the last strains of a certain kind of 1960s idealism and 1970s radicalism. Jonestown’s legacy lives on in the ironic phrase “drink the Kool-Aid”. (In actuality it was Fla-Vor-Aid.)


https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/ ... 0-years-on

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Re: Today in history

#71

Post by Addie » Thu Nov 22, 2018 4:28 pm

John F. Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963) RIP

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Re: Today in history

#72

Post by Lani » Fri Nov 23, 2018 2:48 am

:crying:

I just didn't want to go to school that day and claimed I was sick. My mom went to the beauty salon, while I lounged on the sofa and watched game shows. Then the news broke.

Mom hurried home, distraught. She showed me the book she took to read while waiting in the salon. The King Must Die. (Dad was not a Kennedy supporter. Mom was.)

I retreated to my bedroom and wrote in my diary. I remember some of it. That was the day my image of the USA died. I realized that this is just one more country among many. Presidents are toppled. Governments are overtaken. We weren't special, anointed by god.
Insert signature here: ____________________________________________________

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Re: Today in history

#73

Post by scirreeve » Fri Nov 23, 2018 3:01 am

JFK killing is first memory I have. Was 4. R parents were focused on the B and W TV. They were very sad even though they were (and are) more Nixon folks. I will never forget that.

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Re: Today in history

#74

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Nov 23, 2018 8:38 pm

Not exactly today, but 50 years back this big bird made its appearance in the skies:
US Defense News wrote: Published on 31 Jul 2018

The largest military transport in the U.S.'s arsenal is also one of the largest planes in the world. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the aptly named C-5 Galaxy, and it's been five decades worth celebrating.



Note: in 1975 I got to see this bird very close while it delivered the first of a handful of Northrop F-5E Tiger II fighters (trainer version iirc) to the Swiss Airforce. The remainder of the fleet was built locally in license. History: https://www.vtg.admin.ch/en/einsatzmitt ... tiger.html

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Re: Today in history

#75

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Nov 27, 2018 12:27 pm

on Nov. 20, 1998
20 Years Ago, Space Station Construction Begins

The largest and most complex international construction project in space began on the steppes of Kazakhstan 20 years ago today. Atop its Proton rocket, on Nov. 20, 1998, the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB) thundered off its launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome into cold wintry skies. Zarya was built by the Khrunichev in Moscow and served as a temporary control module for the nascent ISS. Nine minutes later, Zarya was in orbit and began unfurling its antennas and solar panels, seemingly coming alive in the airless environment of low Earth orbit. The launch of the first element of the International Space Station (ISS) kicked off an incredible journey of orbital assembly, operations, and science.

The ISS Program can trace its roots back to 1984, when President Ronald W. Reagan proposed that the United Stated develop an Earth orbiting space station. The United States invited Canada, Japan, and the European Space Agency (ESA) to join the project in 1988, and five years later President Bill Clinton invited Russia to join the partnership. Russia not only brought its many years of experience with long-duration human space flight to the program but also modules for the planned Mir 2 space station. Former adversaries on Earth were now working together to build the largest laboratory in space.

On Dec. 4, Space Shuttle Endeavour on the STS-88 mission roared off Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying the Unity Node 1 module in its cargo bay. Built by The Boeing Corporation at a facility at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, Unity was the first American component of the ISS. Two days after launch, Endeavour and her six-person crew rendezvoused with Zarya, and using the Shuttle’s robotic arm, captured the Russian module and mated it with Unity. Designed and built by engineers thousands of miles apart and never joined together on Earth, the first two modules of the ISS fit perfectly together when they met in space. The STS-88 crew spent the next few days making connections between the two modules before releasing the newly formed but still embryonic ISS. This marked the first step in the assembly of the ISS, which continued for 13 years.



https://www.nasa.gov/feature/20-years-a ... ion-begins

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