Today in history

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RTH10260
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Re: Today in history

#151

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Jul 04, 2019 9:45 pm

135 years ago - 4 July 1884 - France gives the Statue of Liberty to the United States
In a ceremony held in Paris on this day in 1884, the completed Statue of Liberty is formally presented to the U.S. ambassador as a commemoration of the friendship between France and the United States.

The idea for the statue was born in 1865, when the French historian and abolitionist Édouard de Laboulaye proposed a monument to commemorate the upcoming centennial of U.S. independence (1876), the perseverance of American democracy and the liberation of the nation’s slaves. By 1870, sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi had come up with sketches of a giant figure of a robed woman holding a torch—possibly based on a statue he had previously proposed for the opening of the Suez Canal.
https://www.history.com/this-day-in-his ... friendship

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Chilidog
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Re: Today in history

#152

Post by Chilidog » Thu Jul 04, 2019 10:54 pm

Wasn't the statue originally supposed to be a Muslim woman?

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Re: Today in history

#153

Post by RTH10260 » Sat Jul 06, 2019 9:52 pm

100 years ago - First aerial east-to-west Atlantic crossing

The First East to West Transatlantic Flight

By Louise Innes, Principal Transport Project Curator at the National Museum of Flight


At 1.42 am on Wednesday July 2, 1919, a bugle sounded the “Let Go” signal at Royal Naval Air Station East Fortune, East Lothian, Scotland and the 700 ground crew released the huge R34 airship to let it rise slowly into the night sky on the first stage of a record-breaking, 6,000-mile double crossing of the Atlantic.

Constructed at Inchinnan near Glasgow, His Majesty’s Airship R34 was a massive 634 ft long and inevitably nicknamed ‘Tiny’. The gas bags alone required the intestines of 600,000 oxen to make them. She had arrived at East Fortune too late to join wartime convoy protection and anti-submarine activities and only made one operational voyage over the Baltic Sea as a show of strength in advance of the ratification of the Treaty of Versailles.

According to Brigadier General E M Maitland’s fascinating log of the journey, the transatlantic flight had a number of objectives. It aimed to gather information about flying and meteorological conditions in the Atlantic during an extended flight and would investigate whether large rigid airships of this kind could be the future of long-distance travel. By landing in the USA, Britain would also forge new links between the two countries.

The R34’s voyage took place just a few weeks after Alcock and Brown’s record-breaking west-east Atlantic flight in a converted WWI bomber aircraft. As well as undertaking the first east-west crossing of the Atlantic, the R34 would complete the first return journey. Other records were broken during the flight, with Major Pritchard becoming the first person to arrive in the USA by air when he parachuted from the airship to take charge of the hundreds of ground crew required. Also on board this pioneering flight were the world’s first human and feline transatlantic aerial stowaways, William Ballantyne and Wopsie the cat.

Ballantyne, an aircraftsman, had been left out of the 30-strong crew to make room for an American observer as weight was critical. Unwilling to miss out, he hid on top of a girder between the airship’s gas bags. He was discovered, having become overcome by leaking hydrogen from the airship’s gas bags and after recovering, was put to work pumping petrol and cooking.

The R34 reached Mineola, Long Island at 9.45am on July 6, 1919, 108 hours and 12 minutes after it departed East Fortune, following an adventure-filled journey that was hampered by dwindling fuel supplies, violent squalls and a leak that was repaired with the crew’s entire supply of chewing gum.


https://www.theamerican.co.uk/pr/ft-Fir ... -Centenery

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Re: Today in history

#154

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Jul 17, 2019 11:25 am

Of course in the US this is all over the media, why not on TFB also too
Apollo 11 moon launch 50th anniversary
By Spectrum News Staff Milwaukee
PUBLISHED 1:16 PM ET Jul. 16, 2019

(SPECTRUM NEWS) – Fifty years ago today, millions of people watched Apollo 11 launch into space from the Kennedy Space Center, sending three American astronauts to the moon.

Aboard Apollo 11 were Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins. They traveled 240,000 miles in 76 hours to reach the moon. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong and Aldrin separated from the command module and landed lunar module Eagle. A television camera captured Armstrong’s first steps on the moon and his famous quote, “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”

Aldrin joined him as the first people to ever step foot on the moon’s surface, and together they took photos, erected a U.S. flag and ran tests. They left a stainless steel plaque that read, “Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the moon July 1969, A.D. We came in peace for all mankind.”

The men spent the night on the moon and rejoined Collins in the command module. On July 22, the crew returned home and safely descended in the Pacific Ocean two days later.

There have been six U.S. flags planted on the moon by astronauts from Apollo 11, 12, 14, 15, 16 and 17. Each flag is believed to be standing except the Apollo 11 flag.


https://spectrumnews1.com/wi/madison/hu ... nniversary

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Re: Today in history

#155

Post by DejaMoo » Wed Jul 17, 2019 11:30 am

I was a kid in the 60s and astronauts were our heroes. The Apollo moon program was a regular part of our science education in school - frankly, I think the nuns were as excited about following it as we kids were. The program inspired many a family to invest in a telescope or at least spend some time with their kids learning about the stars and our solar system. And it gave the country during a time of great uncertainty and division something to uncontroversial to rally around and take pride in.

We need something like that today.
I've heard this bull before.

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Re: Today in history

#156

Post by MRich » Thu Jul 18, 2019 12:40 am

Google "Saturn rocket washington monument" to see some videos of a projection of the Saturn rocket on the Washington Monument Tuesday night. Way cool!

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Re: Today in history

#157

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Jul 21, 2019 12:54 am

50 years ago - July 20, 1969 - First man on the Moon
Apollo 11's 50th anniversary: Quick guide to the first moon landing
It's been five decades since Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the moon. Here's a look at that achievement -- and what lies ahead.

BY JON SKILLINGS
JULY 20, 2019 11:29 AM PDT

Even Neil Armstrong couldn't remember exactly what he said at that key moment in the first-ever moon landing, NASA's Apollo 11 mission, as he stepped onto the lunar surface. You know the line: "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." And you always wonder: Didn't he mean to say, "...for a man"?

In fairness, he did have a lot on his mind. Even listening to the recording afterward, Armstrong still wasn't quite sure.

"I would hope that history would grant me leeway for dropping the syllable and understand that it was certainly intended, even if it wasn't said -- although it actually might have been," he told biographer James R. Hansen.

History has in fact remembered Armstrong fondly. And now we're celebrating the 50th anniversary of that moon landing. It was July 20, 1969, when Armstrong and fellow astronaut Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin made cosmic history as they became the first humans ever to stand and walk on a heavenly body not called Earth.

It was a breathtaking engineering and logistical achievement. Humans had only started venturing into space less than a decade earlier -- and even then, just barely outside Earth's atmosphere. Our experience of space, which started with Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin in April 1961, was still quite limited when Apollo 8 made a trip 'round the moon in December 1968, the first time humans had ever broken free of Earth's orbit.

But after a total of six moon landings for the Apollo program in less than four years, that was it. Since Apollo 17 in December 1972, no one's been back to the moon. NASA spent the next several decades focusing its manned spaceflight efforts on the space shuttle and on missions to the International Space Station.


https://www.cnet.com/news/apollo-11-50t ... n-landing/

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