Today in history

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Re: Today in history

#101

Post by Volkonski » Tue Feb 12, 2019 12:25 pm

Forty-two years ago today Mrs. V. and I got married. :-D

But I am sure we will both soon adjust. They say that the first 42 years are the hardest. ;)
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Re: Today in history

#102

Post by Estiveo » Tue Feb 12, 2019 12:42 pm

Congrats to the Vs!

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Re: Today in history

#103

Post by Whatever4 » Tue Feb 12, 2019 1:27 pm

Tom Lehrer is THE BEST!! :lovestruck: :lovestruck:
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Re: Today in history

#104

Post by RVInit » Tue Feb 12, 2019 4:28 pm

Yay for Mr and Mrs V!
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Re: Today in history

#105

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:49 pm

Congrats to the V's. 42 years means at least four "decadents"! :clap:
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Re: Today in history

#106

Post by Addie » Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:55 pm

Yay, Volkis :bunny:

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Re: Today in history

#107

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Feb 13, 2019 7:29 pm

RTH10260 wrote:
Fri Feb 08, 2019 1:06 pm
50 years ago - 09 February 1969 - First flight of a Boeing 747 (Jumbo)

:snippity:
an add-on of a military dream


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Re: Today in history

#108

Post by RTH10260 » Sat Feb 23, 2019 10:43 pm

60 years ago - February 22, 1959 - 1st Daytona 500 race
Lee Petty wins first Daytona 500

On this day in 1959, Lee Petty defeats Johnny Beauchamp in a photo finish at the just-opened Daytona International Speedway in Florida to win the first-ever Daytona 500. The race was so close that Beauchamp was initially named the winner by William France, the owner of the track and head of the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR). However, Petty, who was driving a hardtop Oldsmobile 88, challenged the results and three days later, with the assistance of news photographs, he was officially named the champ. There was speculation that France declared Beauchamp the winner in order to intentionally stir up controversy and generate publicity for his new race track.


https://www.history.com/this-day-in-his ... aytona-500


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Re: Today in history

#109

Post by RTH10260 » Sat Mar 02, 2019 11:55 pm

50 years ago - March 2 1969 - First flight of the supersonic Concorde passenger jet


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Re: Today in history

#110

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Mar 03, 2019 12:15 am

70 years ago - March 2 1949 - First non-stop round the world flight completed
Bomberguy wrote: Published on 6 Jan 2008

The first nonstop around-the-world flight was accomplished by B-50A-5-BO (S/N 46-010) "Lucky Lady II" assigned to the 43rd Bomb Group. The flight which lasted from Feb. 26 to March 2, 1949, took 94 hours, 1 minute to complete.

About two-thirds of the B-50As were modified as receiver aircraft for an in-flight refueling technique developed by the British. The fuel delivery aircraft (KB-29M) would fly above and forward of the receiver aircraft (B-50A) and unreel a long refueling hose. The crew of the B-50A would extend an apparatus from the rear of the aircraft designed to snag the refueling hose trailing behind the KB-50M. Once the fuel hose was captured, it was reeled into the B-50A where the crew connected it to the refueling manifold. Once the fuel transfer was complete, the hose was released and the KB-29M reeled in back.

The "Lucky Lady II" flew a route covering 23,452 miles and required numerous in-flight refuelings. The 43rd Air Refueling Squadron supplied four pairs of KB-29M tankers for refueling, making it possible for the "Lucky Lady II" to complete the round-the-world flight nonstop. Although this early type of in-flight refueling was quickly replaced by more efficient methods, the around-the-world flight was proof that the USAF was capable of projecting air power anywhere in the world. The Cold War had started and the United States, Great Britain and France were in the middle of the Berlin Airlift, which started in June 1948 and lasted until September 1949.


more information in the Youtube video description https:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXf1fSiOYPs

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Re: Today in history

#111

Post by Addie » Mon Mar 04, 2019 11:05 am

Frances Perkins



4th United States Secretary of Labor

In office: March 4, 1933 – June 30, 1945
Presidents: Franklin Roosevelt, Harry Truman

Born: April 10, 1880, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
Died: May 14, 1965 (aged 85), New York City, New York, U.S.

Education Mount Holyoke College (BA), Columbia University (MA), University of Pennsylvania

Frances Perkins (born Fannie Coralie Perkins; April 10, 1880 – May 14, 1965) was an American sociologist and workers-rights advocate who served as the U.S. Secretary of Labor from 1933 to 1945, the longest serving in that position, and the first woman appointed to the U.S. Cabinet. As a loyal supporter of her friend, Franklin D. Roosevelt, she helped pull the labor movement into the New Deal coalition. She and Interior Secretary Harold L. Ickes were the only original members of the Roosevelt cabinet to remain in office for his entire presidency.

During her term as Secretary of Labor, Perkins executed many aspects of the New Deal, including the Civilian Conservation Corps, the Public Works Administration and its successor the Federal Works Agency, and the labor portion of the National Industrial Recovery Act. With the Social Security Act she established unemployment benefits, pensions for the many uncovered elderly Americans, and welfare for the poorest Americans. She pushed to reduce workplace accidents and helped craft laws against child labor. Through the Fair Labor Standards Act, she established the first minimum wage and overtime laws for American workers, and defined the standard forty-hour work week. She formed governmental policy for working with labor unions and helped to alleviate strikes by way of the United States Conciliation Service. Perkins dealt with many labor questions during World War II, when skilled labor was vital and women were moving into formerly male jobs. ...

Early career and continuing education

After college, she held a variety of teaching positions including a position teaching chemistry from 1904 to 1906 at Ferry Hall School (now Lake Forest Academy), an all girls school in Lake Forest, Illinois. In Chicago, she volunteered at settlement houses, including Hull House where she worked with Jane Addams. She changed her name from Fannie to Frances when she joined the Episcopal church in 1905. In 1907, she moved to Philadelphia and enrolled at University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School to learn economics. After two years in Philadelphia, Perkins moved to Greenwich Village, where she attended Columbia University and became active in the suffrage movement. In support of the suffrage movement, Perkins attending protests, meetings, advocated for the cause on street corners. She obtained a master's degree in political science from Columbia in 1910.

She achieved statewide prominence as head of the New York Consumers League in 1910 and lobbied with vigor for better working hours and conditions. Perkins also taught as a professor of sociology at Adelphi College. The next year, she witnessed the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, a pivotal event in her life. The factory employed hundreds of workers, mostly young women, but lacked fire escapes. When the building caught fire, many workers tried unsuccessfully to escape through the windows. One hundred forty-six workers died. It was because of this fire Frances Perkins would leave her office at the New York Consumers League and, on the recommendation of Theodore Roosevelt, become the executive secretary for the Committee on Safety of the City of New York. In 1913, Perkins was instrumental in getting New York to pass a "fifty-four-hour" bill capping the number of hours women could work. Perkins pressed for votes for the legislation, encouraging proponents including legislator Franklin Delano Roosevelt to filibuster while Perkins called state senators to make sure they could be present for the final vote. In 1912, Perkins resigned as New York secretary of the Consumers League to take the position of executive secretary with the Committee on Safety. The Committee on Safety was formed to increase fire safety following the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire. As part of the Committee on Safety, Perkins investigated the fire at the Freeman plant in Birmingham, New York in which 63 people died. Perkins blamed lax legislation or the loss.

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Re: Today in history

#112

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Mar 05, 2019 4:17 pm

Not exactly today but
30 years ago - October 1998 - Salman Rushdie publishes "The Satanic Verses"
and resulted in a fatwā calling for Rushdie's death issued by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, then Supreme Leader of Iran, on 14 February 1989.

Looking Back at Salman Rushdie’s ‘The Satanic Verses,’ 30 Years Later
By Lakshmi Gandhi -October 4, 2018
Salman Rushdie's 'The Satanic Verses' was published in 1988

It has been 30 years since author Salman Rushdie first published “The Satanic Verses,” his highly controversial novel in which the author drew inspiration from the life of the Muslim prophet Muhammad.

The novel created an instant sensation upon its release and led Rushdie to go into hiding the following year after a fatwa was placed on him by Iran’s Ayatollah Khomeini in 1989.

In honor of the book’s anniversary, cultural commentators and essayists have been looking back on the legacy of “The Satanic Verses” in recent weeks and reflecting on how the literary scene and the world at large has changed since then.


https://www.thetealmango.com/culture/lo ... ars-later/
The Satanic Verses: 30 Years On review – what an astonishing fallout

Mobeen Azhar explores the effects of Salman Rushdie’s novel and fatwa on his community – and poses complex questions about free speech

Rebecca Nicholson
Wed 27 Feb 2019 22.00 GMT Last modified on Wed 27 Feb 2019 22.05 GMT

What an extraordinary story The Satanic Verses: 30 Years On tells – and what a way to do that. The broadcaster and journalist Mobeen Azhar, a radio presenter on the BBC Asian Network, who also won a Bafta for Muslims Like Us in 2017, was a child growing up in Huddersfield when The Satanic Verses was published in 1988. Three decades later, he wants to know why this novel had such a powerful effect on his community and how long-lasting and far-ranging the fallout has been.

He begins by reading it for the first time, in order to understand why it became such a focal point for accusations of blasphemy – the laws against which protected only Christians and not Muslims in Britain (they were abolished in 2008). Azhar recalls Rushdie as a sort of spectre of his childhood and, with smiling disbelief, recalls a game they invented in the playground of his school: how would they kill Salman Rushdie? Upon reading The Satanic Verses as an adult, and as a self-proclaimed liberal Muslim, it is clear that he has some understanding of why it caused such offence and outrage. But it seems that Azhar’s instinct is towards freedom of speech and he sets out to understand better how it could be otherwise.

As it faithfully recalls the facts and rapid escalation of anti-Rushdie protests, from the book burnings in Bradford to riots on the streets of Islamabad, and the infamous fatwa issued by Ayatollah Khomeini of Iran, it takes the shape of any number of contemporary documentaries – at first. Azhar frames it as a personal journey and his interviews are largely framed as informal chats, rather than journalistic grillings. In some ways, this is the Stacey Dooley approach to film-making, a deformalisation of whatever a documentary once was, in favour of a new, looser shape. This is a co-production with Vice Studios and it certainly lacks stuffiness.


https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radi ... ng-fallout


a Youtube search on discussions
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_ ... A+30+Years



a user commented snippet from a TV Special 27 February 2019 production by the BBC

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Re: Today in history

#113

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Mar 12, 2019 1:30 am

30 years ago - March 12 1989 - The WWW web was born
The World Wide Web — not the internet — turns 30 years old
The World Wide Web was conceived on March 12, 1989 by computing legend Tim Berners-Lee.
By Aja Romano@ajaromano Mar 12, 2019, 12:24am EDT

Google Doodle
Is that a dial-up modem ringing in your ears, or are you just looking at today’s Google Doodle? It might be both, because March 12 marks a special moment in the history of the internet — the birthday of the World Wide Web.

The series of tubes we know and love as the web is now a sprightly 30 years old. The www you see in your browser’s address bar when you access a URL, a.k.a. the web, a.k.a. what helps keep you tethered to your screens, is barely a millennial; indeed, the web is 18 years younger than email, and two years younger than the GIF.

Wondering what the difference is between the world wide web and the internet? Rethinking your ability to explain what the web actually is? Strap in, because the answers are fun and inspiring, and there’s no time like a birthday to time travel through internet history.



https://www.vox.com/2019/3/12/18260709/ ... le-history

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Re: Today in history

#114

Post by neonzx » Tue Mar 12, 2019 7:27 am

RTH10260 wrote:
Tue Mar 12, 2019 1:30 am
30 years ago - March 12 1989 - The WWW web was born
Yeah, it feels that long ago. Here's where I played before the web,

Image

Was anyone else hanging on local Free-nets back in the late 80s? I know CWRU was first. Then local BBS's popped up rapidly, mostly run by private individuals in their homes as a hobby.
To which Trump replied, Fuck the law. I don't give a fuck about the law. I want my fucking money.

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Re: Today in history

#115

Post by ZekeB » Tue Mar 12, 2019 7:29 am

With 300 or 1200 dialup modems. The introductory page featuring a picture of Spuds McKenzie, which took five minutes to draw.
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Re: Today in history

#116

Post by Northland10 » Tue Mar 12, 2019 7:57 am

neonzx wrote:
Tue Mar 12, 2019 7:27 am
RTH10260 wrote:
Tue Mar 12, 2019 1:30 am
30 years ago - March 12 1989 - The WWW web was born
Yeah, it feels that long ago. Here's where I played before the web,

Image

Was anyone else hanging on local Free-nets back in the late 80s? I know CWRU was first. Then local BBS's popped up rapidly, mostly run by private individuals in their homes as a hobby.
ISCABBS (Iowa Student Computer Association BBS), the BBS run from the University of Iowa back in the day (and accessible elsewhere by telnet). Apparently, it is still up, but no longer hosted at the University of Iowa. The association is now the Iowa Student Computer Alumni.
North-land: of the family 10

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Re: Today in history

#117

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Mar 12, 2019 9:08 am

Started my online career somewhere around 1988 after I purchased a Apple Mac SE, the first one to have a harddisk. Connection was with a 300bd acoustic coupler on dialup phone lines. Had a handfull of local bbs at the time, few of them for Apple. Shortly after followed with my first Compuserve subscription that allowed me to visit sites in the US.

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Re: Today in history

#118

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Tue Mar 12, 2019 11:06 am

Does this count? In the 70's, my dad, a structural engineer, had dial up access to a database somehwherz in space to run his engineering computations. I was the monkey at the keyboard typing his detailed foreign language instructions and capturing, rolling and paperclipping the tickertape it produced.
Edit: The other keyboard monkey, my twin, said Dad used the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace computer in St. Louis. Dad also had a "laptop" in the 70's. It weighed 40 pounds.
“A black woman can invent something for the benefit of humankind.” -Bessie Blount-Griffin, physical therapist, inventor of devices for disabled WWII veterans, and forensic scientist.

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Re: Today in history

#119

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Mar 24, 2019 9:48 am

30 years ago --- March 24, 1989
Exxon Valdez oil spill
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Exxon Valdez oil spill occurred in Prince William Sound, Alaska, March 24, 1989, when Exxon Valdez, an oil tanker owned by Exxon Shipping Company, bound for Long Beach, California, struck Prince William Sound's Bligh Reef, 1.5 mi (2.4 km) west of Tatitlek, Alaska, at 12:04 am.[1][2] local time and spilled 10.8 million US gallons (260,000 bbl) (or 37,000 metric tonnes)[3] of crude oil over the next few days.[4] It is considered to be one of the most devastating human-caused environmental disasters.[5]


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exxon_Valdez_oil_spill

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Re: Today in history

#120

Post by GreatGrey » Sun Mar 24, 2019 8:41 pm

Shannyn worked on a boat doing cleanup, vacuuming up the oil. She’s said every now and the the pumps would labor a bit, then back to normal. Just sucking up dead otters & birds.

I am not "someone upthread".
Trump needs to be smashed into some kind of inedible orange pâté.

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Re: Today in history

#121

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Mar 31, 2019 10:53 pm

75 years ago - April 1, 1944 - Swiss city of Schaffhausen bombared by the US Airforce

Small photo gallery at the link.
Als US-Flieger Schaffhausen bombardierten

Am 1. April 1944 ist das Undenkbare geschehen: Bomben fielen auf eine Schweizer Stadt. Flieger der US-Luftwaffe griffen irrtümlich Schaffhausen an – 40 Menschen kamen ums Leben, Hunderte verloren ihr Obdach.

Vor exakt 75 Jahren hat ein verirrtes Geschwader der US-Luftwaffe Bomben auf Schaffhausen abgeworfen. Über 40 Tote, 270 Verletzte, fast 500 Obdachlose und 1000 verschwundene Arbeitsplätze war die Bilanz.



https://www.bluewin.ch/de/news/schweiz/ ... 28430.html
Heillos verflogen

Die drei Geschwader waren Teil einer 1000 Flugzeuge umfassenden Division, die ab Südengland mit Ziel Chemiewerke IG Farben nach Ludwigshafen gestartet war. Aber die meisten hatten schon über dem Ärmelkanal abgedreht, weil die Sicht schlecht war, der Wind die Maschinen vom Kurs abtrieb und der Radar verrückt spielte.

Die Geschwader, welche es bis nach Süddeutschland schafften, suchten Ludwigshafen vergeblich und warfen auf dem Rückflug ab. Seine Staffel habe ein letztes noch mögliches Ziel bombardiert, «um 10.50 Uhr mit bescheidenem Resultat», funkte ein US-Bomber auf dem Rückflug nach England.

by Google Translate:
When US airmen bombed Schaffhausen

On April 1, 1944, the unthinkable happened: bombs fell on a Swiss city. Airmen of the US Air Force mistakenly attacked Schaffhausen - 40 people were killed, hundreds lost their shelter.

Exactly 75 years ago, a stray US Air Force squadron dropped bombs on Schaffhausen. More than 40 dead, 270 injured, nearly 500 homeless and 1000 disappeared jobs was the balance sheet. [/ Quote]

Totally lost

The three squadrons were part of a 1000 aircraft division, which was launched from southern England with destination chemical plants IG Farben to Ludwigshafen. But most of them had already turned off the English Channel because the visibility was bad, the wind knocked the engines off course and the radar went crazy.

The squadrons, which made it to southern Germany, searched in vain for Ludwigshafen and dropped off on the return flight. His squadron bombed one last possible target, "at 10.50 with a modest result," radioed a US bomber on the return flight to England.[/ Quote]

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Re: Today in history

#122

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Apr 02, 2019 9:22 am

recent history this time, only 15 years ago - April 1 2004 - Google unveils Gmail
Gmail continues to define email 15 years on
The service celebrates its 15th birthday a day before it kills off Inbox.

Nicole Lee

Today is April 1st, a day for pranks and corny jokes. One of the biggest culprits is Google, which comes up with a hoax every year (remember YouTube Snoopavision or Google Play for Pets?). But on April 1st, 2004, Google debuted a product that was decidedly not a joke: Gmail. It was a service that revolutionized web mail, so much so that it has become an integral part of our daily lives.

Gmail began as invite-only, to the point where invitations were actually bought and sold on eBay as if they were some sort of precious commodity. Invitations would remain the sole way of signing up for the service until 2007. While webmail services like Hotmail and Yahoo Mail existed back then, Gmail had a killer selling point: a gigabyte of free storage. We might laugh at that now, but that was a huge amount of space at the time. (Google now offers 15GB standard, with the option to purchase more.) The thought of never having to delete or manage your email ever again was, and still is, an enticing one.


https://www.engadget.com/2019/04/01/gmail-15-years/

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Re: Today in history

#123

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Apr 02, 2019 10:12 am

70 years ago - April 4, 1949 - NATO Treaty signed
Wikipedia wrote:The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO /ˈneɪtoʊ/; French: Organisation du traité de l'Atlantique nord; OTAN), also called the North Atlantic Alliance, is an intergovernmental military alliance between 29 North American and European countries. The organization implements the North Atlantic Treaty that was signed on 4 April 1949.[3][4] NATO constitutes a system of collective defence whereby its independent member states agree to mutual defence in response to an attack by any external party. NATO’s Headquarters are located in Haren, Brussels, Belgium, while the headquarters of Allied Command Operations is near Mons, Belgium.

Since its founding, the admission of new member states has increased the alliance from the original 12 countries to 29. The most recent member state to be added to NATO is Montenegro on 5 June 2017. NATO currently recognizes Bosnia and Herzegovina, Georgia, North Macedonia and Ukraine as aspiring members.[5] An additional 21 countries participate in NATO's Partnership for Peace program, with 15 other countries involved in institutionalized dialogue programs. The combined military spending of all NATO members constitutes over 70% of the global total.[6] Members have committed to reach or maintain defense spending of at least 2% of GDP by 2024.[7][8]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NATO
use Google for all the articles: https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=70+years+nato

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Re: Today in history

#124

Post by DejaMoo » Tue Apr 09, 2019 10:22 am

Today is the anniversary of Lee's surrender at Appomattox.

I've heard this bull before.

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Re: Today in history

#125

Post by Addie » Fri Apr 12, 2019 10:01 am

Atlanta Time Machine

April 12, 1945:


Life magazine photographer Ed Clark took this powerful picture of Graham Jackson in Warm Springs as the body of FDR was put into a hearse to make the trip to the Warm Springs train station to begin the journey to Washington D.C. to lie in state.

Life Magazine published the photo on April 23, 1945. According to reports filed at the time, Jackson was playing Dvorak's Going Home.

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