ART: I know it when I see it

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Tiredretiredlawyer
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Re: ART: I know it when I see it

#101

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Tue Dec 04, 2018 10:48 am

That is a moving piece. The woman's expression is so vivid. I felt the warmth of his hands through her gloves. It reminds me of the second proposal scene in "Pride and Prejudice" .


“A black woman can invent something for the benefit of humankind.” -Bessie Blount-Griffin, physical therapist, inventor of devices for disabled WWII veterans, and forensic scientist.

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Re: ART: I know it when I see it

#102

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Mon Dec 17, 2018 9:51 am

Takashi Nagoya born 1978 Japan.
DuMhOu0XgAExcgt.jpeg
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“A black woman can invent something for the benefit of humankind.” -Bessie Blount-Griffin, physical therapist, inventor of devices for disabled WWII veterans, and forensic scientist.

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Re: ART: I know it when I see it

#103

Post by EastStander » Mon Dec 17, 2018 11:47 am

Thanks TRL. That is beautiful, yet it took me a while before I noticed the little bird. Having a Japanese daughter in law, I am currently very into this kind of art. It led me on to an appreciation of the Ukiyo-e woodblock prints of the 18th and 19th centuries. Hokusai's 'The Great Wave off Kanagawa' of course is one of the most famous examples.



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Re: ART: I know it when I see it

#104

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Sat Dec 29, 2018 12:05 pm

EastStander wrote:
Mon Dec 17, 2018 11:47 am
Thanks TRL. That is beautiful, yet it took me a while before I noticed the little bird. Having a Japanese daughter in law, I am currently very into this kind of art. It led me on to an appreciation of the Ukiyo-e woodblock prints of the 18th and 19th centuries. Hokusai's 'The Great Wave off Kanagawa' of course is one of the most famous examples.
My youngest son and I love the "Great Wave". He pointed out the boats to me. For years I never saw those. I was focused on the wave height and the fear it inspired.


“A black woman can invent something for the benefit of humankind.” -Bessie Blount-Griffin, physical therapist, inventor of devices for disabled WWII veterans, and forensic scientist.

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Re: ART: I know it when I see it

#105

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Sat Dec 29, 2018 12:08 pm



https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/12 ... hysicists/
ON THE SECOND DAY OF CHRISTMAS —
Study: modern masters like Jackson Pollock were “intuitive physicists”


“A black woman can invent something for the benefit of humankind.” -Bessie Blount-Griffin, physical therapist, inventor of devices for disabled WWII veterans, and forensic scientist.

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Re: ART: I know it when I see it

#106

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Sat Jan 12, 2019 12:57 pm

https://thebjps.typepad.com/my-blog/201 ... ience.html
Aesthetics in Science | Milena Ivanova

Some philosophers claim that the aesthetic language used by scientists is reducible to, or a manifestation of, the empirical adequacy of a theory. On this account, when a scientist is attributing aesthetic value to a theory, they are simply using a different language to say that the theory is empirically adequate. This account makes it difficult to justify why aesthetic values play an evidential role and are often taken to be predictors or indicators of empirical success, or even truth, in the absence of supporting evidence. String theorists, for example, often appeal to aesthetic considerations in defence of the theory in the absence of any empirical support.

Aesthetic considerations can guide theory choice in situations of under-determination of theory by the data, leading to the adoption of one empirically adequate theory over another. Ernst Mach’s principle of ‘economy of thought’, for example, is one such methodological application of simplicity as a heuristic guide to empirically adequate theories. Beauty is also often taken to stand in a special epistemic link to truth. Many scientists argue that a beautiful theory is more likely to be true. Paul Dirac famously defended beauty’s special epistemic role, claiming that ‘one has a great confidence in the theory arising from its great beauty, quite independent of its detailed successes’. Such ideas are present in contemporary science as much as they were part of debates in the early twentieth century, but how can such a link between beauty and truth be justified?
:snippity:
It remains fascinating that so many contemporary scientists are driven by aesthetic factors and so many of them claim that the aesthetic values that drive them have timeless, objective validity. While scientists can also be sceptical towards the objective validity of aesthetic judgements, we see these judgements persistently employed in practical reasoning. Although it is doubtful that any link between beauty and truth can be justified, or even that aesthetic values are indicative of empirical success, it is interesting why we value beautiful explanations and actively search for symmetry, simplicity, and unity in nature and in our representations of the world.
beauty.png
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“A black woman can invent something for the benefit of humankind.” -Bessie Blount-Griffin, physical therapist, inventor of devices for disabled WWII veterans, and forensic scientist.

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Re: ART: I know it when I see it

#107

Post by Dolly » Tue Feb 12, 2019 2:14 am

Arts, Artists, Artwork
February 8 at 6:22 AM
Artwork (sculpture) by Thomas Deininger

Instagram @tdeininger


Avatar by Tal Peleg Art of Makeup https://www.facebook.com/TalPelegMakeUp

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