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GreatGrey
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#101

Post by GreatGrey »

Now 106,000 acres
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Volkonski
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#102

Post by Volkonski »

At least a dozen units from the Houston Fire Department responded to a reported fire at the Alley Theatre at Louisiana Street and Texas Street in downtown Houston.Firefighters were still on the scene mid-afternoon, pulling out duct work, said HFD spokesman Jay Evans. The fire was under control but not out.The theater, a form of Brutalist architecture, is undergoing a $46.5 million renovation, which began July 14.About 100 firefighters are at the scene, said Kenyatta Parker, public information officer with the Houston Fire Department. http://www.chron.com/houston/article/Do ... ?cmpid=bna
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#103

Post by Volkonski »

California burning.


Nearly 6,000 firefighters were trying to contain a dozen wildfires in California Tuesday, including a fast-spreading fire east of Sacramento and a fire near Mount Shasta that left ashy skeletons of houses and a church in its wake.





A top-level federal management team had assumed command of the King Fire in El Dorado County, Calif., indicating the level of concern and potential for loss of homes and life, after the fire's breadth jumped to 11,570 acres.


Snip------








In Northern California close to the Oregon border, residents were beginning to assess the damage after the Boles Fire quickly damaged or destroyed 100 homes and a church on Monday. The fire erupted south of the small town of Weed, Calif., in the afternoon, and winds gusting up to 40 mph pushed it into and around town, where flames mowed through a hillside neighborhood.





Snip------





Hot, dry weather has exacerbated conditions caused by a record drought. In addition to destroying homes and forests, the wildfires have been spewing unhealthy smoke into the air, prompting air-quality alerts in portions of the state sweltering under high temperatures and low humidity. Cal Fire alone has responded to more than 4,800 wildfires this year, 1,000 more than average. That doesn't include fires handled by federal officials, said Cal Fire spokesman Daniel Berlant.http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nati ... /15711207/
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#104

Post by Maybenaut »

Our cabin is outside the town of Luray, VA. Last night as we were driving through town, I saw one of the larger houses on fire. The whole thing was one big fireball. By that point the fire dept was trying to keep the fire from spreading to the neighboring houses. So, so sad.
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#105

Post by Volkonski »

California Gov. Brown declares state of emergency as wildfires rage The fast-moving King fire in El Dorado County, meanwhile, exploded in size overnight, from 27,930 acres to nearly 71,000 acres. More than 2,000 homes and 1,500 other buildings were threatened by the blaze, which was just 5% contained as of Thursday morning, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. More than 3,300 firefighters have been assigned to the blaze.In Madera County, the 320-acre Courtney fire has destroyed 30 homes, 19 outbuildings and 13 vehicles. It was 70% contained as of Wednesday evening.Meanwhile, the state’s largest fire continues to be the Happy Camp Complex fire in Klamath National Forest. The fire, which began Aug. 12 and has burned more than 125,000 acres, is 68% contained, the U.S. Forest Service reported.http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-m ... story.html
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#106

Post by Addie »

How awful.
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#107

Post by kate520 »

It's tinder dry here, even more so than NoCal because we are a desert. im surprised and grateful that we dont have more fire activity here now.
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#108

Post by Volkonski »

More than 7,800 firefighters battled wildfires roaring across the state Saturday, as bone-dry terrain and heat created prime conditions for the blazes to spread rapidly.The worst of the fires, the King Fire that is burning just east of Placerville in El Dorado County, spread an additional 6 square miles overnight and was just 10 percent contained as of Saturday, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire.The fire ignited a week ago. A Pollock Pines man accused of starting the blaze is being held on $10 million bail.Assessment teams also began surveying the damage on Saturday, hoping for a more accurate picture of just how many structures have been destroyed. Several homes and other structures were burned near the foothills town of Pollock Pines, but dangerous conditions had prevented investigators from determining an exact number. http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/King ... 769529.php http://yubanet.com/nevada/King.php :(
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#109

Post by Foggy »

When I lived in Orange County, CA, there was a major fire in Laguna Beach. Not as big as this fire. A Mexican immigrant was arrested for it a few days later, and the cops all swore he was the right guy, because he had information about the fire that he couldn't possibly have unless he started it himself. He was in deep Bandini, as we say in SoCal. Until his mom showed up with records proving conclusively that he'd been in jail in Mexico on the day the fire started. They dropped all charges and the cops refused to explain how they'd made such a mistake. I hope they have the right guy with this Pollock Pines man.
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#110

Post by mimi »

10mhttps://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/3756501940/b44c1089f0042712f6d807e49325f7ac_normal.png ABC News Travel @ABCNewsTravel Chicago-area airports reporting 850+ flight cancellations after fire at FAA facility, Chicago Dept. of Aviation says - @ABCaviation ABC News @ABC Suspect in FAA facility fire taken to hospital with burns and self-inflicted wounds, federal law enforcement source says - @JackDate Police: Fire at FAA radar center deliberately set but 'no terrorist act' There is no terrorist act," said Aurora police Chief Greg Thomas. "This is a local issue with a contract employee and nothing else."The employee was found in the basement of the radar facility suffering from self-inflicted wounds, police said. He was taken to a hospital and the radar center was shut down and evacuated. The man is not an air traffic controller or FAA manager, according to an FAA source at the facility.The source, who received a briefing from officials, said it appears the injured person is a contractor. "He is not a FAA employee,'' the source said. more:http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/loca ... story.html

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#111

Post by SueDB »

One story up at the moment is that the contractor was being transferred to Hawaii and was pissed about it. Prison or Hawaii - big choice, eh?
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#112

Post by Addie »

LA Times













Massive downtown L.A. burns apartment complex; 2 other buildings damaged





A massive fire in downtown Los Angeles early Monday engulfed an apartment tower under construction, damaged two other buildings and left freeways closed.



The California Highway Patrol said the 110 Freeway is closed between the 10 and 101, and the 101 southbound is closed at Alvarado Street. The CHP urged motorists to avoid the area.



More than 250 firefighters are battling the blaze at an apartment tower under construction 909 W. Temple St., Los Angeles Fire Department spokesman David Ortiz said.



“It’s huge," he said. ...



Moore said the apartment complex covered an entire block. The bottom two stories were made of concrete; the upper five floors were made of wood frame. Much of the structure was lost.












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#113

Post by Sterngard Friegen »

I go by that massive construction whenever I go to court. I was thinking about going downtown today to listen to oral argument in a case in the court of appeal, but this fire has made up my mind. Traffic is going to be horrendous.



And, as to cause, sounds like arson to me, coming on a Monday morning (when construction activity should have ceased at least 36 hours earlier).

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#114

Post by Addie »

Stay home, Sternie.




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#115

Post by Sterngard Friegen »

Well, traffic is not bad -- yet. But come 9:30 (when oral argument starts) it will be massive gridlock.



I'm not going downtown. (I do have to go out to Glendale later, though, to go through some records.)

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#116

Post by Citizen Like Obama »

Good you skipped driving in. The exits near the court houses were all closed when I drove in this morning (very early and it was still terrible). Further the air was filled with smoke. Even though my building did not have fire damage and windows blown out as a couple office buildings nearby did, it certainly had smoke penetrate.

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#117

Post by Estiveo »

Yesterdays L.A. fire from a distance.







Or, as my friend Greg put it, "I just realized why we have so much traffic here! One does not simply walk into Mordor!"
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#118

Post by TollandRCR »

Two floors of cement, five floors wood frame. Does this makes sense in terms of earthquake damage prevention? In terms of tenant safety?
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#119

Post by Sterngard Friegen »





Two floors of cement, five floors wood frame. Does this makes sense in terms of earthquake damage prevention? In terms of tenant safety?







Wood flexes. And I am pretty sure the wood frame was (or was going to be) reinforced with steel supports.



L.A. does have pretty tough earthquake standards.

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#120

Post by Volkonski »



Two floors of cement, five floors wood frame. Does this makes sense in terms of earthquake damage prevention? In terms of tenant safety?





The design of earthquake resistant buildings is complex and the details will vary greatly depending on the nature of the supporting soil.



That having been said, it is possible that the use of two cement stories underneath five wood frame stories was done to avoid having "soft stories" at the bottom of the building. A soft story or "weak story" is a story that is weaker than the stories above it. Ground level stories can tend to be weaker than upper stories because 1- ground level stories may have more windows and large door openings in the exterior walls for retail and commercial operations, 2- ground level stories may have few interior walls if the space is used for large open area plans like retail or restaurant operations. Upper levels used for office or living space will have more walls which add strength.



In an earthquake the more rigid upper stories move together causing the weaker lower stories to bend and collapse. For example-





Using concrete frames for the lower stories makes them stronger. Using wood frames for the upper stories makes them cheaper.



The City of San Francisco has a program to retrofit older buildings to eliminate soft stories.



http://www.sfgsa.org/index.aspx?page=6048





Soft Story Condition

This condition is due to large openings in their perimeter walls and to a lack of interior partition walls at the ground level. Usually, perimeter wall openings at the ground level make way for garage doors or large windows. Interior spaces used for retail and garages often have few partition walls. The open condition makes the ground level significantly weaker and more flexible than the floors above it. During strong earthquake shaking, these “soft” ground level walls cannot support the side-to-side or front-to-back- movement of the stiff and heavy mass of the stories above them, lending to damage and, in the worst of cases, to collapse.


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#121

Post by chancery »



Two floors of cement, five floors wood frame. Does this makes sense in terms of earthquake damage prevention? In terms of tenant safety?



Per a friend of mine, whose two sons are pursuing engineering doctorates, one at Stanford, the other at Berkeley: there is no hotter field these days for bright graduate students than the branch of civil engineering that involves designing earthquake resistant cement structures.

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#122

Post by precision32 »

If you get a chance visit the Foot Hills Community Law and Justice Center in Rancho Cucamonga, CA. I was construction Inspector on this building. It was the second largest seismically isolated structure in the US at the time of construction. The building sets on 98 laminated steel and rubber pads. The basement is 2 foot thick poured concrete floors and walls and makes the secure holding areas for those awaiting trial. The framing for each floor gets lighter as they go up. The ground can move 18" in any direction and the building will set relatively still. Interesting project.

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#123

Post by TollandRCR »

Back in the 1960s, I visited Mexico City in the company of residents of the city. They were very proud of the new Torre Latinoamericana skyscraper, partially because it was then Mexico's tallest skyscraper but mostly because of its performance in the 1957 earthquake. Is that kind of construction now standard? What was being built in LA sounds very different.
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#124

Post by Sam the Centipede »

I was holidaying in Kefalonia (a Greek island in the Mediterranean, the setting for the book and film "Captain Corelli's Mandolin") a few years back. The island was devastated by an earthquake in 1953.Driving around, one sees lots of new-build reinforced concrete houses (many with an unfinished storey, due to Greece's tax laws making that financially advantageous) but occasionally there would be a slightly delapidated but charming stone house, perhaps a farm house. My first thought was "oh, what a shame that nobody can be bothered to renovated and live in such a charming house" then I considered further and realized that living in a charming house is not an attractive proposition if the whole thing might fall on you in the next moderately strong earthquake.Yes, designing for earthquakes is quite tricky but very important.

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#125

Post by GreatGrey »

Hey, Ya gotta love a house that kills ya then stacks up a cairn over your grave.
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