Train Wreck - Train Derailment

Post Reply
User avatar
mimi
Posts: 31130
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 12:01 am

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#1

Post by mimi » Fri Jul 12, 2013 12:36 pm

In France.





'Many hurt' in France train crash


Breaking news





Many people have been hurt in a train crash at Bretigny-sur-Orge, south of the French capital Paris, reports say.





The intercity train had just left Paris and was heading towards Limoges when it derailed, crashing into a station platform at about 16:00 GMT.





People are reportedly trapped inside the train and a local official said there were "many casualties".[/break1]bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-23294630]http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-23294630

User avatar
mimi
Posts: 31130
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 12:01 am

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#2

Post by mimi » Fri Jul 12, 2013 12:37 pm

Oh no! Michael van Poppel @mpoppelBFM TV: At least 8 dead in France train derailment; some of the 350 passengers were electrocuted Michael van Poppel @mpoppelFrance 24: 'Red Alert' declared in France municipality after train derailment near Paris

User avatar
ZekeB
Posts: 15774
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 10:07 pm
Location: Northwest part of Semi Blue State

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#3

Post by ZekeB » Fri Jul 12, 2013 12:41 pm

I suppose there are plusses and minuses to overhead and third rail electrification. This is obviously a minus. Perhaps if there could be a way to quickly shut the power down when a sensor detects this type of problem? As was said, I know a little about everything and much about nothing.
Ano, jsou opravdové. - Stormy Daniels

Nech mě domluvit! - Orly Taitz

User avatar
mimi
Posts: 31130
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 12:01 am

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#4

Post by mimi » Sun Dec 01, 2013 8:50 am

RT @cnnbrk: At least 2 people have died in train derailment in Bronx, a New York City police source tells CNN. [/break1]it/18vzsOV]http://cnn.it/18vzsOV[/break1]cnn.com/2013/12/01/travel/new-york-train-derails/index.html]http://www.cnn.com/2013/12/01/travel/ne ... index.htmlThere's live video coverage here:[/break1]go.com/wabc/live]http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/liveIt overturned just a few feet from the Hudson River.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 33202
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#5

Post by Addie » Sun Dec 01, 2013 9:42 am

[link]New York Daily News,http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/nyc ... -1.1533963[/link]: Four dead, dozens injured after Manhattan-bound Metro-North passenger train derails in Bronx





http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_ ... 533968.jpg
Democracy is a garden that has to be tended. -Barack Obama

User avatar
TollandRCR
Posts: 20731
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 11:17 pm
Location: RIP, my friend. - Foggy

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#6

Post by TollandRCR » Sun Dec 01, 2013 10:19 am

In early November 2013, the NTSB began a two-day hearing on railway and train safety. BusinessWeek Nov. 6, 2013 [link]Metro-North Wrecks Said to Show U.S. Rail-Safety Breakdown,http://www.businessweek.com/news/2013-1 ... -breakdown[/link]“It’s a national problem,” Senator Richard Blumenthal, a Connecticut Democrat, told reporters before a National Transportation Safety Board hearing in Washington. “Metro-North is just the most visible recent example.”The NTSB is investigating the infrastructure and maintenance history and practices of the Northeast U.S. commuter railroad following a May 17 crash between two of its trains near Bridgeport, Connecticut. One train derailed as it traveled over broken track and was hit by another headed the opposite way, in a crash Metro-North said caused $18.5 million in damage. ...U.S. lawmakers last passed legislation strengthening rail safety in 2008 following a preventable head-on crash in Los Angeles. Blumenthal said it’s time again for “stronger standards for scrutiny and oversight as well as for general maintenance and inspection” of railroads.“This hearing will illuminate key safety issues from these two accidents, so that the entire industry, from manufacturers to operators to regulators, can benefit from the lessons learned in order to prevent loss of life and injuries in the future,” NTSB Chairwoman Deborah Hersman said at the hearing."Eyewitness accounts" of this morning's wreck speak of "high speed" following a "hard turn," which is reminiscent of the recent Spanish derailment. Eyewitness accounts also tell of cars being in the water. None of these accounts may be true. However, what is true is that this zone of the Hudson Line of Metro North recently saw the derailment of a train carrying garbage. On-board recorders should tell us whether the eyewitness accounts bear any truth.
“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

User avatar
Volkonski
Posts: 22292
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#7

Post by Volkonski » Sun Dec 01, 2013 1:07 pm

From the CNN article-The train operator -- who is among the injured -- told investigators he applied brakes to the train, but it didn't slow down, a law enforcement official on the scene and familiar with the investigation said.From that and the photos of the wreck it appears that the train's brakes failed to work when they were applied to slow the train as it was going round a curve before entering Sputen Duyvil Station. The train jumped the curving tracks and continued more or less in a straight line until coming to a stop. Rearward cars jack-knifed and some of the cars fell over onto their right sides (looking in the direction of travel) which is what one would expect as they were turning to the left. At that location the rail line which to the north runs along the eastern side of the Hudson River makes a ~45 degree turn and then runs along the north side of the Harlem River.
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

User avatar
ZekeB
Posts: 15774
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 10:07 pm
Location: Northwest part of Semi Blue State

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#8

Post by ZekeB » Sun Dec 01, 2013 3:59 pm

The train probably has a recorder. That should tell all. I'm no engineer, but I'd think the proper way to slow the train would be to reduce power well before the curve.
Ano, jsou opravdové. - Stormy Daniels

Nech mě domluvit! - Orly Taitz

User avatar
Volkonski
Posts: 22292
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#9

Post by Volkonski » Sun Dec 01, 2013 5:30 pm

The train probably has a recorder. That should tell all. I'm no engineer, but I'd think the proper way to slow the train would be to reduce power well before the curve.No, that would not be practical. Trains take a long time to slowdown. They are designed that way in order to minimize fuel consumption. One of the big advantages of rail is the very low friction of the steel wheels on the steel rails. At normal running speeds, trains take miles to slow down significantly without the use of their brakes. Slowing a train's speed simply by reducing power in a place like NYC with many curves would greatly reduce the average speed and increase travel times. Even using brakes, trains need long distances to slow. An automobile can stop from 60 MPH in about 170 feet (not including the distance required for the driver's reaction time before applying the brakes.) A light electric-powered rail train/trolley with two self-powered cars might take 600 to 1000 feet. A diesel-powered passenger train with 7 to 10 cars (like the one in the Bronx derailment) would take about 3000 to 4000 feet. A long 100 car freight train might take 2 miles or even more. That is why all safety planning must make the assumption that in any emergency situation a train can't stop soon enough to do any good. By the time the operator can see a problem and throw the train into emergency braking there is not enough distance remaining for the train to stop before it reaches the problem's location.
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

User avatar
Mikedunford
Posts: 10415
Joined: Mon Dec 06, 2010 9:42 pm

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#10

Post by Mikedunford » Sun Dec 01, 2013 5:35 pm

Even using brakes, trains need long distances to slow. An automobile can stop from 60 MPH in about 170 feet (not including the distance required for the driver's reaction time before applying the brakes.) A light electric-powered rail train/trolley with two self-powered cars might take 600 to 1000 feet. [highlight]A diesel-powered passenger train[/highlight]with 7 to 10 cars (like the one in the Bronx derailment) would take about 3000 to 4000 feet. A long 100 car freight train might take 2 miles or even more. That is why all safety planning must make the assumption that in any emergency situation a train can't stop soon enough to do any good. By the time the operator can see a problem and throw the train into emergency braking there is not enough distance remaining for the train to stop before it reaches the problem's location.The train might have had a diesel engine (haven't looked much at pictures) if it was a train scheduled to run past Croton-Harmon, but if so it was not running on diesel power at the point of derailment. The Metro-North diesels are dual-mode, and that area is third rail electric.
"I don't give a fuck whether we're peers or not."
--Lord Thomas Henry Bingham to Boris Johnson, on being asked whether he would miss being in "the best club in London" if the Law Lords moved from Parliament to a Supreme Court.

User avatar
Volkonski
Posts: 22292
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#11

Post by Volkonski » Sun Dec 01, 2013 6:00 pm

Even using brakes, trains need long distances to slow. An automobile can stop from 60 MPH in about 170 feet (not including the distance required for the driver's reaction time before applying the brakes.) A light electric-powered rail train/trolley with two self-powered cars might take 600 to 1000 feet. [highlight]A diesel-powered passenger train[/highlight]with 7 to 10 cars (like the one in the Bronx derailment) would take about 3000 to 4000 feet. A long 100 car freight train might take 2 miles or even more. That is why all safety planning must make the assumption that in any emergency situation a train can't stop soon enough to do any good. By the time the operator can see a problem and throw the train into emergency braking there is not enough distance remaining for the train to stop before it reaches the problem's location.The train might have had a diesel engine (haven't looked much at pictures) if it was a train scheduled to run past Croton-Harmon, but if so it was not running on diesel power at the point of derailment. The Metro-North diesels are dual-mode, and that area is third rail electric.The train was traveling from Poughkeepsie and so had a diesel-electric engine (visible in the CNN photos) and push-pull coaches. It would have had a long stopping distance compared to light rail self-powered electric-only cars.Additional relevant info from Wikipedia-The Hudson, Harlem and New Haven lines and the New Canaan branch are equipped for cab signaling, and all passenger rolling stock is equipped to receive the cab signal. Cab signaling displays the appropriate block signal in the engineer’s cab. All rolling stock is equipped with Automatic Train Control (ATC). ATC enforces the speed dictated by the cab signal by means of a penalty brake application should the engineer fail to obey it.
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

User avatar
TollandRCR
Posts: 20731
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 11:17 pm
Location: RIP, my friend. - Foggy

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#12

Post by TollandRCR » Sun Dec 01, 2013 6:19 pm

The Metro North Hudson Line train schedule earlier today showed that a train leaving Poughkeepsie at 5:54AM was due to stop at Spuyten Duyvil at 7:20AM. This was the time of the wreck. If this schedule is correct, it makes little sense that the driver tried to stop by using the brakes. Cutting the power would have gotten the job done until until the train was right at the station. Metro North's tracks may be in need of serious repair, but even a well-maintained track bed cannot avoid accidents if drivers do not perform as expected.
“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

User avatar
Sterngard Friegen
Posts: 44481
Joined: Wed Aug 05, 2009 12:32 am
Location: Over the drawbridge

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#13

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Sun Dec 01, 2013 7:06 pm

Any modern car that requires 170 feet to stop from 60 MPH these days is known as a wreck.

User avatar
Sugar Magnolia
Posts: 10286
Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2012 6:44 am

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#14

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Sun Dec 01, 2013 7:22 pm

Any modern car that requires 170 feet to stop from 60 MPH these days is known as a wreck.60 MPH = 88 fps. (fps=1.467 * MPH). If the vehicle deceleration rate is 20 fpsps (rather than the previously calculated 15 fps), then stopping time = 88/20 = 4.4 seconds. Since there is a 1 second delay (driver reaction time) in hitting your brakes (both recognition and reaction time is often 2 seconds), the total time to stop is 5.4 seconds to 6.4 seconds. To determine how far the vehicle will travel while braking, use the formula of 1/2 the initial velocity multiplied by the time required to stop. In this case, this works out to be .5 * 88 * 4.4 = 193.6 feet, plus a reaction time of either 88 feet for a second delay in reaction time, or 176 feet for two seconds reaction time. That yields 281.6 feet or 369.6 when added to the base stopping distance of 193.6 feet. If the driver is very responsive and takes only a half a second to react, the distance is reduced to 237.6 feet. Notice that the reaction time is a huge factor since it is at initial velocity. Based on pure math, it is evident that there is a very large difference in the reported performance tests and reality. Assuming a deceleration rate of 32 fpsps (1g), calculations indicate a braking stop time of 2.75 seconds (88/32). Distance traveled now is calculated to be 121 feet, which is for all practical purposed, the published performance figures, excluding reaction times. [/break1]csgnetwork.com/stopdistinfo.html]http://www.csgnetwork.com/stopdistinfo. ... g/Stopping DistancesMPH Ft./Sec. Braking Deceleration Distance Perception Reaction Distance Total Stopping Distance 60 88 172 132 304

User avatar
TollandRCR
Posts: 20731
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 11:17 pm
Location: RIP, my friend. - Foggy

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#15

Post by TollandRCR » Mon Dec 02, 2013 4:15 pm

In 2008 Congress passed legislation requiring the installation of automated systems that should slow a train that is exceeding the speed limit for a section of track. It could also avoid certain other causes of wrecks. What it could not avoid, had it been in place, is an accident due to brake failure. In September, 2013, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority awarded contracts for $428 million to begin the development of such a system on Metro North and LIRR tracks. The law required that installation of this system be completed by 2015. The MTA has asked for an extension of the deadline to 2018, on the grounds that there are "technological and other hurdles in installing such a system across more than 1,000 rail cars and 1,200 miles of track." I suggest that European railways already have such a system in place, and companies might be ready to install it in the U.S. (I recognize that looking to "old Europe" for anything is a sin to some.)http://www.npr.org/templates/story/stor ... =248139188
“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

User avatar
TollandRCR
Posts: 20731
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 11:17 pm
Location: RIP, my friend. - Foggy

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#16

Post by TollandRCR » Mon Dec 02, 2013 5:10 pm

[link]NTSB says,http://www.cbsnews.com/news/metro-north ... ntsb-says/[/link] that the Metro North train was going 82mph at the time it entered the 30mph zone from a 70mph zone. NTSB board member Earl Weener said the NTSB is not aware of any problem with the train's brakes.Weener said that approximately six seconds before the rear engine of the train came to a stop, the throttle was reduced to idle and five seconds before the locomotive came to a stop, the brake pressure dropped to zero resulting in full application of the brakes."At this point in the investigation we don't know what the initiating event was for either the throttle going to idle or the brake pressure going to zero," Weener said.This is beginning to sound a lot like the Spanish train wreck of this year.
“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

User avatar
ZekeB
Posts: 15774
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 10:07 pm
Location: Northwest part of Semi Blue State

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#17

Post by ZekeB » Mon Dec 02, 2013 5:59 pm

I'll wait for the full report, but I was skeptical of the brake failure explaination from the beginning.
Ano, jsou opravdové. - Stormy Daniels

Nech mě domluvit! - Orly Taitz

User avatar
Volkonski
Posts: 22292
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#18

Post by Volkonski » Mon Dec 02, 2013 7:14 pm

Per Wikipedia article about Metro North-The Hudson, Harlem and New Haven lines and the New Canaan branch are equipped for cab signaling, and all passenger rolling stock is equipped to receive the cab signal. Cab signaling displays the appropriate block signal in the engineer’s cab. All rolling stock is equipped with Automatic Train Control(ATC). ATC enforces the speed dictated by the cab signal by means of a penalty brake application should the engineer fail to obey it.Another reference source-ATC systems in the United States are almost always integrated with existing continuous cab signalling systems. The ATC comes from electronics in the locomotive that implement some form of speed control based on the inputs of the cab signalling system. If the train speed exceeds the maximum speed allowed by the cab signals an overspeed alarm sounds in the cab. If the driver fails to reduce speed and/or make a brake application to reduce speed a penalty brake application is made automatically. Due to the more sensitive train control issues with freight trains, ATC is almost exclusively applied to passenger locomotives in both inter-city and commuter service with freight trains making use of cab signals without speed control. Some high-volume passenger railroads such as Amtrak, Metro North and the Long Island Rail Road require the use of speed control on freight trains that run on all or part of their systems.[/break1]cakitches.com/general/automatic-train-control.html]http://www.cakitches.com/general/automa ... ntrol.htmlSo Metro North trains have ATC. Did the ATC system fail to work thus contributing to Sunday's derailment?As to 82 MPH, the Metro North Hudson line uses GE P32AC-DM (GENESIS Series II) locomotives.[/break1]wikipedia.org/wiki/P32AC-DM#P32AC-DM]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P32AC-DM#P32AC-DMThe P32AC-DM is primarily a diesel locomotive geared for a top speed of 110 MPH. It can run on electric power from a third rail but with a much lower top speed (~60 MPH) and only for a limited time, long enough to get into and out of Manhattan via the tunnels where diesel power is not allowed. Near as I can find out, electric power is not used north of the Mott Haven Junction in the south Bronx. So, for what little it matters, the derailed train was probably operating on diesel power at the time of the crash.
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

User avatar
TollandRCR
Posts: 20731
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 11:17 pm
Location: RIP, my friend. - Foggy

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#19

Post by TollandRCR » Mon Dec 02, 2013 7:23 pm

The Wikipedia entry and the other entry say directly that Metro North trains have an automatic braking system that would override any failure of the driver to obey the speed limit. Yet Metro North says that it has yet to install the Congressionally-mandated safety system. The recorder shows a speed that was 52 mph higher than allowed. An NTSB person says that no evidence of brake failure has been found. Something is wrong somewhere in this story.
“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

User avatar
Volkonski
Posts: 22292
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#20

Post by Volkonski » Tue Dec 03, 2013 12:14 am

The Wikipedia entry and the other entry say directly that Metro North trains have an automatic braking system that would override any failure of the driver to obey the speed limit. Yet Metro North says that it has yet to install the Congressionally-mandated safety system. The recorder shows a speed that was 52 mph higher than allowed. An NTSB person says that no evidence of brake failure has been found. Something is wrong somewhere in this story.The ATC that Metro North has now is not the same thing as the Congressionally-mandated system due in 2015. Even if the brakes themselves did not fail, the controls that activate the brakes might have failed. These investigations take a long time.The reports that the braking system was thrown into emergency a few seconds before the derailment is consistent with a failure of the normal braking control system which caused the engineer to take the only other action then available to him. Throwing a train into emergency is a desperate action. Once the braking system is thrown into emergency, the train will stop, one way or another, and it will stay stopped. There is then no way for the engineer to release the brakes and resume travel.All this was explained to me by a Union Pacific engineer some years ago as part of my job training. Rail logistics was part of my too many areas of expertise. Once the situation requires emergency braking, all an engineer can do is throw it into emergency and assume a crash position.The ATC should have warned the engineer that the train was traveling too fast and it should have applied the brakes if the engineer did not respond immediately. It seems that at a minimum that it didn't apply the brakes. It may not have warned the engineer. We will know more in a few weeks. Like the CSB in the West Fertilizer explosion, the NTSB is underfunded and always too busy. :( There will be a detailed report eventually.
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

User avatar
TollandRCR
Posts: 20731
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 11:17 pm
Location: RIP, my friend. - Foggy

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#21

Post by TollandRCR » Tue Dec 03, 2013 8:12 am

The explanation may involve determining whether the ATC system was installed and operating on that section of track. The NTSB ought to be able to determine that. I don't trust Metro North to reveal anything that might be damaging to its chances in lawsuits.
“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

User avatar
ZekeB
Posts: 15774
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 10:07 pm
Location: Northwest part of Semi Blue State

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#22

Post by ZekeB » Tue Dec 03, 2013 10:31 am

I noticed the train arrived at the station exactly on time. It was also stated that the train was exceeding the speed limit by a considerable amount even before reaching the 30 MPH zone. This makes me wonder if the engineer was behind schedule and was hell bent on making up time.
Ano, jsou opravdové. - Stormy Daniels

Nech mě domluvit! - Orly Taitz

User avatar
TollandRCR
Posts: 20731
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 11:17 pm
Location: RIP, my friend. - Foggy

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#23

Post by TollandRCR » Tue Dec 03, 2013 11:37 am

I noticed the train arrived at the station exactly on time. It was also stated that the train was exceeding the speed limit by a considerable amount even before reaching the 30 MPH zone. This makes me wonder if the engineer was behind schedule and was hell bent on making up time.If the train were scheduled to stop at the Spuyten Duyvil station, the engineer should have been almost at a stop as the train rolled into the station. My growing suspicion is obvious: the safety system was not operating, and the engineer was asleep or deeply distracted.
“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

User avatar
Volkonski
Posts: 22292
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#24

Post by Volkonski » Tue Dec 03, 2013 11:54 am

I noticed the train arrived at the station exactly on time. It was also stated that the train was exceeding the speed limit by a considerable amount even before reaching the 30 MPH zone. This makes me wonder if the engineer was behind schedule and was hell bent on making up time.Perhaps, but if the ATC was working it should have prevented him from doing any such thing by automatically applying the brakes once the train exceeded the speed limit. It should have responded on the 70 MPH track since the train was going 82 MPH. We need more data.I am unsure about what would be the incentive for an engineer to speed even if late. Commuter rail engineer is a routine and straight-forward job. If you drive the train and obey the rules then you retire with a full pension after 30 years. It is not a job that would attract risk takers or people who like a lot of excitement in their lives.Speculation accomplishes little but from what has been reported, the train was going at 82 MPH on the straight track north of the curve. That's 120 feet/second. The train has to decelerate to 30 MPH to negotiate the curve. Say that it takes 2500 feet for the train to decelerate from 82 to 30 MPH. That would take about 30 seconds which isn't much time. If the engineer tried to apply the brakes and they didn't work, the train would cover that 2500 feet in only 20 seconds. It has been reported that the engineer threw the train into emergency 6 seconds before it derailed. That leaves 14 seconds during which the engineer might have been trying to get the regular braking controls to work before giving up and throwing the train into emergency. The whole thing happened in less than a minute.
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

User avatar
ZekeB
Posts: 15774
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 10:07 pm
Location: Northwest part of Semi Blue State

Train Wreck - Train Derailment

#25

Post by ZekeB » Tue Dec 03, 2013 1:12 pm

In other words, the engineer should have been decelerating on the 70 MPH track and he wasn't. I would think that the moment you hit the 30 MPH section you should already be doing 30 MPH.
Ano, jsou opravdové. - Stormy Daniels

Nech mě domluvit! - Orly Taitz

Post Reply

Return to “► ► Breaking News ◄ ◄”