Another Industrial Disaster - Tragedy

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#1

Post by mimi » Mon Jun 03, 2013 12:55 pm

Fire at Chinese Poultry Plant Kills 119








Jun 3, 2013 9:28am








At least 119 people were killed when a massive fire broke out in poultry processing plant in Jilin province. More than 50 people were injured.





The Jilin Baoyuanfeng Poultry Plant employs about 1,200 people. An estimated 350 workers were on site when the fire began.





The plant’s narrow hallways, a locked front gate and what survivors explained as “complicated interior” made escape difficult, according to local media reports.





“I could only crawl desperately going forward,” 39-year-old Gao Yan told the state-run news agency Xinhua. She said the emergency exit near her station was blocked and she was nearly caught in a stampede to escape.more:


[/break1]go.com/blogs/headlines/2013/06/fire-at-chinese-poultry-plant-kills-119/]http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2 ... kills-119/

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#2

Post by Tarrant » Mon Jun 03, 2013 1:11 pm

Whenever I see articles like this - talking about this tragedy, the Bangladesh fire, etc. - the part that always jumps out at me is the "locked front gate". All of these "workers" are locked into the building, and are not free to leave or even quit. Many live on compounds within the factory grounds when not within the factory (I recall the pictures of people trying to jump out of windows of the FoxConn factory in China trying to escape, leading to them...putting up nets so people couldn't get out or kill themselves that way).It's slavery justified by a thin veneer of paying the people a few pennies a day.

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#3

Post by mimi » Mon Jun 24, 2013 3:38 pm

Breaking News @BreakingNews1 dead in fertilizer plant explosion in Union Mills, Indiana - @WSBT

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#4

Post by realist » Tue Jun 25, 2013 9:26 am




Breaking News @BreakingNews





1 dead in fertilizer plant explosion in Union Mills, Indiana - @WSBT[link]CBS news,http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-201_162-575 ... ne-person/[/link]





Indiana fertilizer plant explosion kills one person





Authorities say an explosion at a [highlight]grain bin[/highlight] in northwest Indiana left one person dead.


James Swank, 67





The cause of the explosion at Union Mills Co-op Monday afternoon was not immediately clear. The department says in a news release that the victim, 67-year-old James Swank, was a co-op employee believed to be working [highlight]in the silo[/highlight] when the blast happened.





CBS News affiliate WSBT in South Bend, Ind., reported that evidence from the scene indicates Swank may have been on top of a tower at the LaPorte when a [highlight]possible grain dust explosion[/highlight] occurred and knocked him off the tower. Police say Swank fell about 175 feet.





[...]





A statement released by the department also said that no hazardous chemicals were involved in or released in the explosion.
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#5

Post by Foggy » Tue Jun 25, 2013 9:30 am

Oh, sure. I was raised in the city myself. You don't mean there's a difference between a grain dust explosion in a grain silo and a fertilizer explosion in a fertilizer plant, do ya? :lol:

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#6

Post by SueDB » Tue Jun 25, 2013 9:32 am

Oh, sure. I was raised in the city myself. You don't mean there's a difference between a grain dust explosion in a grain silo and a fertilizer explosion in a fertilizer plant, do ya? :lol:Well, I did fall off the turnip truck last Thursday.... 8-) 8-)
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#7

Post by Addie » Thu Feb 12, 2015 8:44 am

Reuters











Toxic orange cloud spreads after chemical blast near Barcelona









MADRID (REUTERS) - Three people were injured in an explosion at a chemical plant in northern Spain on Thursday and authorities advised residents of several small towns near Barcelona to stay indoors as a large toxic cloud spread over the area.

The regional government of Catalonia said in a statement that the blast appeared to have been caused by two chemicals coming into contact during delivery to the plant, owned by Spanish company Simar.

Simar could not immediately be reached for comment.

A thick orange cloud could be seen emanating from the site in Igualada, some 60 km from Barcelona, according to pictures and television footage of the incident, before spreading over residential areas nearby.



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#8

Post by TexasFilly » Thu Feb 12, 2015 9:41 am







One of the two chemicals involved, nitric acid, was corrosive and toxic, authorities said.Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/reuter ... z3RXeKfOTi

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The Red Cross cited firefighters as saying the chemicals were [hlyellow]nitric acid and ferric chloride.[/hlyellow] http://www.buzzfeed.com/tomnamako/terri ... maD0V7ooVE
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#9

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Thu Feb 12, 2015 10:00 am

When Taitz reads about this (here, of course), she'll wonder where in California it occurred.

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#10

Post by mmmirele » Thu Feb 12, 2015 10:48 am

Wow, that orange color gives new meaning to the phrase "toxic cloud."

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#11

Post by Flatpointhigh » Thu Feb 12, 2015 10:51 am





When Taitz reads about this (here, of course), she'll wonder where in California it occurred.





She'll see Simar, and read it as SILMAR

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#12

Post by Volkonski » Thu Feb 12, 2015 11:23 am

Ramon Espadaler, of Catalonia's interior ministry, said the resulting combination of gases emitted from the warehouse in Igualada, 40 miles from Barcelona, was an irritant and not, as earlier reported, toxic, adding, "Most likely it will cause itchy eyes and a runny nose, but no choking sensation."





Read more: http://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/ ... z3RY4iVqM8
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#13

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Thu Feb 12, 2015 11:25 am

Ramon should show everyone it's safe . . .

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#14

Post by Volkonski » Thu Feb 12, 2015 11:27 am

Firefighters said the blast was caused when the contents of a delivery – reportedly including[hlyellow] chemicals such as nitric oxide and ferric chloride[/hlyellow] – became mixed as they arrived at a warehouse in Igualada on Thursday morning.





http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/f ... last-spain



Chemicals such as nitric acid and ferric chloride but not necessarily those chemicals or just those chemicals.
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#15

Post by Volkonski » Thu Feb 12, 2015 11:42 am

Anhydrous ferric chloride decomposes when heated releasing chlorine gas. However, ferric chloride is mostly used, stored and shipped as part of a solution with water and various acids. It is in such a form that it appears in Simar's catalog. The catalog also shows various organic powers that would have reacted violently with nitric acid. We may have to wait to find out what really happened.
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#16

Post by Dolly » Wed Feb 18, 2015 2:40 pm

California refinery explosion: Torrance residents shelter in place

large explosion occurred Wednesday morning at the Exxon Mobil refinery in Torrance, causing ash to fall on the area and police to order some schools and residents to shelter in place.

Torrance police told residents near the refinery to remain indoors, turn off any heating and air systems and close their windows.

..............

As of 10:30 a.m., the refinery was still accounting for all personnel and "evaluating the cause of the incident, or the occurrence or amount of any damages," he said.

.........

The refinery is at 3700 W. 190th St. in Torrance. It covers 750 acres and employes about 650 employees and 550 contractors. The refinery processes an average of 155,000 barrels of crude oil per day and produces 1.8 billion gallons of gasoline a year. <SNIP>





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http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-m ... story.html



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#17

Post by Reality Check » Wed Feb 18, 2015 2:51 pm

There is a refinery strike by the USW Oil Workers bargaining unit going on at 11 refineries across the US that began on February 1st. Torrance is not one of the plants on strike. I think it is a USW plant, however.
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#18

Post by Volkonski » Wed Feb 18, 2015 3:37 pm

From the photos it looks like a furnace was affected. The "ash" was probably insulation material.
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#19

Post by Reality Check » Wed Feb 18, 2015 3:47 pm





From the photos it looks like a furnace was affected. The "ash" was probably insulation material.







Either that or foam. They mix a foaming agent into the water when fighting petroleum fires. It puts out the fire by smothering the pool of hydrocarbon with foam and keeping away air. I would say a furnace explosion is a good guess also. They are the most dangerous pieces of equipment in a typical refinery. You often have hydrocarbon at hundreds of degrees in metal tunes with gas flames running over 1000 F. Tube leaks can be bad news. Another issue is the oxygen to fuel ration. If there is too little air the furnace can flame out then explode when air is reintroduced and all the unburned gas ignites at once.
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#20

Post by Volkonski » Wed Feb 18, 2015 6:54 pm

OK, not a furnace, a boiler. The actual explosion seems to have been in the electrostatic precipitator. That's why there was so little damage and why the fire was put out so quickly. The EP contains only fly ash and boiler flue gas. It is a big electric dust collector.





Trade publication OPIS, citing an unidentified source, reported that an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), which reduces fluid catalytic cracker particulates, exploded as contract workers were doing maintenance on the nearby fluid catalytic cracking unit, or FCC.



http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/02/ ... VR20150218



A fluid cat cracker-


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#21

Post by TexasFilly » Wed Feb 18, 2015 7:23 pm

It's always the contract workers. They seem the ones to be killed the most too. But Exxon, at least in their refineries, seems to have a far better record than others.
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#22

Post by kate520 » Wed Feb 18, 2015 8:08 pm

Last time I was over in that vicinity we were eating outdoors at a restaurant on the pier when the daily venting happened. For about 30 minutes every day it looks like there's a huge fire near the refinery.
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#23

Post by Volkonski » Wed Feb 18, 2015 8:28 pm



It's always the contract workers. They seem the ones to be killed the most too. But Exxon, at least in their refineries, seems to have a far better record than others.





The reason for that is that most of the workers who are physically present out in the plant are contract workers. The direct employees are the managers, engineers, skilled technicians and such. They spend very little time in the plant operating areas. The people out in the plant are the semiskilled and unskilled workers who do the few remaining manual labor jobs that haven't been automated.



Take that ExxonMobil refinery as an example. It covers 750 acres and has 650 direct employees and 550 contractors. About 450 of those are professionals and their support (clerks, secretaries, lab techs, purchasing, HR, PR, drafting, cafeteria, medical, security, janitorial, IT, etc). They work in the plant's office building during the day. Most of them are direct. The remaining 800 work out in the plant. Some work only day shifts so during the day there might be 350 people out in the plant. That's about one person per every 2 acres and many of those workers rarely leave the control rooms. That is how highly automated plants are now. Modern plants are like ghost towns.



So it is mostly contract workers who are in harm's way.



Should also point out that nowadays employees who have no work-related reason for being in the plant are forbidden from enter the operating areas. Back in the old days we engineers often used to drive thru plants from the office building as a short cut to get to the main highway or go to lunch. Not any more. No unauthorized vehicles or people in the operating areas, ever. The last few years I worked I could not enter an operating plant area for which I was fully safety trained and where I had approved work to do without an escort to drive me and stay with me. (This might have had something to do with concern that the old man would pass out in the heat while wearing heavy fire protective clothing, helmet, gloves, goggles, safety boots, etc. ;) )
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#24

Post by magdalen77 » Thu Feb 19, 2015 12:14 pm

I got my Nomex around here somewhere. Ummmm, actually I don't. It's been years since I used it and it was folded up in a storage tub in my late apartment. :confuzzled: The steel toes, hard hat, safety googles and hearing protection are still here in my office in case I ever have to use them again.

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#25

Post by TexasFilly » Thu Feb 19, 2015 12:25 pm









It's always the contract workers. They seem the ones to be killed the most too. But Exxon, at least in their refineries, seems to have a far better record than others.





The reason for that is that most of the workers who are physically present out in the plant are contract workers. The direct employees are the managers, engineers, skilled technicians and such. They spend very little time in the plant operating areas. The people out in the plant are the semiskilled and unskilled workers who do the few remaining manual labor jobs that haven't been automated.



Take that ExxonMobil refinery as an example. It covers 750 acres and has 650 direct employees and 550 contractors. About 450 of those are professionals and their support (clerks, secretaries, lab techs, purchasing, HR, PR, drafting, cafeteria, medical, security, janitorial, IT, etc). They work in the plant's office building during the day. Most of them are direct. The remaining 800 work out in the plant. Some work only day shifts so during the day there might be 350 people out in the plant. That's about one person per every 2 acres and many of those workers rarely leave the control rooms. That is how highly automated plants are now. Modern plants are like ghost towns.



So it is mostly contract workers who are in harm's way.



Should also point out that nowadays employees who have no work-related reason for being in the plant are forbidden from enter the operating areas. Back in the old days we engineers often used to drive thru plants from the office building as a short cut to get to the main highway or go to lunch. Not any more. No unauthorized vehicles or people in the operating areas, ever. The last few years I worked I could not enter an operating plant area for which I was fully safety trained and where I had approved work to do without an escort to drive me and stay with me. (This might have had something to do with concern that the old man would pass out in the heat while wearing heavy fire protective clothing, helmet, gloves, goggles, safety boots, etc. ;) )







Yes, and putting the contract workers in harm's way is also a great way for Big Oil to attempt to dodge liability when a contract worker is killed or severely injured.
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