Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#226

Post by NMgirl » Sun Nov 18, 2018 11:24 pm

Thanks, as always, for the excellent updates, arock. :bighug:

So minor compared to the fires, but we were practically giddy today when the smoke index went down to 163 here in San Francisco. The highest level we had was 244, so 163 today made it seem like we were breathing the pure mountain air of Northern New Mexico.
Stern: Come back. My posts are becoming sloppy and ill-thought out.

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#227

Post by arock » Mon Nov 19, 2018 12:40 am

During the 2017 Wine Country fires, Sonoma County's emergency alert system performance was underwhelming.

Problems with telephone alerts have been a common theme in almost every major fire. Sonoma County has been working to improve its emergency operations and its alert system; here are three articles from September about this as a follow-on to this post: http://thefogbow.com/forum/viewtopic.ph ... 0#p1044627 .
Sonoma County, Santa Rosa tests new cellphone emergency alert system

Starting at 10 a.m., the county and Santa Rosa sent a series of test messages aimed at thousands of cellphones in five target locations using the federal Wireless Emergency Alerts system — the same program the county controversially opted not to use during last October’s wildfires, leaving many residents without any official warning.
. . .
The wireless messages were aimed first at cellphones in Guerneville, followed by Glen Ellen and Kenwood, then Healdsburg, Penngrove and finally Roseland. The tests concluded with countywide trial messages sent through local television and radio channels distributed through the federal Emergency Alert System.

Early reports indicated the cellphone messages were not always confined to the set boundaries planned by local administrators.
. . .
And even in Guerneville, where flooding from the Russian River is common, many people received no message at all, said Supervisor Lynda Hopkins, who represents the region. Hopkins said she called the Russian River fire department and was told not a single employee there received a mobile notification.
Santa Rosa Press Democrat Sonoma County, Santa Rosa tests new cellphone emergency alert system September 12, 2018

Sonoma County cellphone warnings scrambled by carriers, internal report says

Sonoma County cannot geographically target wireless emergency warnings as closely as it would like and the reach of those alerts appears to vary significantly by cellphone carrier, according to a new analysis of a widespread test conducted last month.

In a report released Friday, county officials said nearly 3,700 survey responses to the Sept. 12 mobile alert trial showed some messages were received far beyond the five specific areas they were aimed.

The test also exposed key differences in how the county’s major cellphone carriers distribute emergency alerts. Such “inconsistent policies” will lead to “significant issues” for public officials trying to warn community members about an emergency, the report said.
. . .
Verizon requires a cell tower to be located inside the boundaries of an alert area in order to send an emergency message, the report said. AT&T did not answer the county’s questions but because the carrier “had such a large bleed over,” the report concludes “any cell tower’s coverage that is within the boundaries of the alert issues the emergency message.”

“These differences cause significant issues for alert and warning officials when issuing alerts,” the report said. “With current policies of mobile carriers, it is almost impossible to target any area with any confidence.”
Santa Rosa Press Democrat Sonoma County cellphone warnings scrambled by carriers, internal report says October 5, 2018

Sonoma County considering warning sirens as part of fire recovery

Sonoma County leaders signaled Tuesday they are exploring the use of warning sirens as a new tool to better alert the public about future wildfires or other major emergencies.

The county and Santa Rosa earlier this month applied for federal grant funds that would help design and install 20 warning sirens in various locations, with half the devices located in unincorporated areas and the other half installed in city limits, according to county staff.

The project is estimated to cost $850,000, of which $637,500 would be covered by grant funds.

The embrace of such conventional warning systems stems in part from the fallout over Sonoma County’s failure to issue more widespread alerts to residents in the path of October’s firestorm, which killed 24 people in the county. Many survivors were left to wonder why official evacuation alerts — in the form of phone calls, text messages or loudspeaker announcements — never came for them.
Santa Rosa Press Democrat Sonoma County considering warning sirens as part of fire recovery September 25, 2018

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#228

Post by arock » Mon Nov 19, 2018 12:52 am

An Op-Ed from the New York Times
What the Dutch Can Teach Us About Wildfires

By Crystal Kolden
An associate professor of fire science at the University of Idaho and a former wildland firefighter.
. . .
Instead, we should take a cue from the Dutch. Much of the Netherlands sits below sea level and is therefore prone to flooding, but the Dutch can’t exactly move en masse next door to Germany. So they have learned over the centuries that the solution is to stop fighting the sea, and build their cities and towns to maximize saving lives through smarter planning and infrastructure. We could do the same with wildfire.

Some parts of the country already follow the Dutch model, intentionally or not. The southeastern United States has not lost significant numbers of homes or lives to fire, despite its vast expanse of the “wildland-urban interface” — the mixture of rural homes and towns with wild vegetation. That’s not because the region is immune to fire. It’s because, in part, the Southeast uses prescribed fire across millions of acres each year to reduce how much vegetation is left to burn, effectively using intentional fires to limit out-of-control wildfire.
. . .
All of [Montecito's] preparation was tested in the Thomas Fire last December. The ongoing drought had primed the vegetation for explosive growth. Downhill winds developed, gusting over 60 miles per hour, pushing the fire into the community and raining embers down on homes. It was the worst-case scenario imaginable. Fire-behavior models projected that hundreds of homes could be lost in such conditions. When it was over, however, Montecito emerged with no fatalities, no injuries and only seven homes lost.
. . .
Other communities in the West are implementing their own strategies. In San Diego, new subdivisions are being built with fire-resistant designs and materials so residents can stay safe in their homes while the fire burns around them, instead of risking evacuation and the perils of clogged roads. San Diego Gas and Electric has also focused on strategic blackouts during high wind events to reduce the risk of power line ignitions.
. . .
In Colorado, communities are building fire breaks and “greenbelts” of fire-resistant green grass that completely surround the community, creating the equivalent of a moat that fire can’t easily cross. In the inland Northwest, rural farmers and ranchers have developed rangeland fire protection associations to prepare for and combat fast-moving rangeland fires with farm and construction equipment.
NYT What the Dutch Can Teach Us About Wildfires

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#229

Post by Kendra » Mon Nov 19, 2018 4:30 am

For the record, I was just over to Twitler's page. Nothing about the fire except to Saturday's late *promo* video of his visit.

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#230

Post by Slim Cognito » Mon Nov 19, 2018 7:27 am

If you want to donate to the Red Cross California Wildfire Fund and get a cool T-shirt.

https://www.bonfire.com/national-rake-alliance/
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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#231

Post by Addie » Mon Nov 19, 2018 10:26 am

Nice T-shirt! :daydream:

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#232

Post by Kendra » Mon Nov 19, 2018 12:07 pm


Trump said Pres Sauli Niinistö of Finland told him Finnish people spend a lot of time raking up leaves from the forest. Niinistö says he never said it. Of course, Cult45 will believe such an irrational thing was said because they believe literally ANYTHING out of Trump's mouth.
So...I have made a few trips up and over the Sierra Nevada and all the trees I remember seeing were pine trees. When did they start growing leaves?

How does the rake the forest problem solve what happened further south in Malibu and elsewhere? I haven't been to Malibu, but do they have a lot of trees out there with forests that need raking?

:sarcasm:

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#233

Post by arock » Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:19 pm

camp fire 11-19.JPG

butte co sheriff 11-19.JPG


Many changes in evacuation areas today, from closed to warning status. Link listed above.


Among the specialized resources responding to aid in the search are four California Regional US&R Task Forces, each consisting of 29 members from local government fire departments, three local/state/national US&R Task Forces (each consisting of 35 members from California fire departments,) and ten Urban Search & Rescue Human Remains Detection Canine Teams.

On Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, 37 personnel from US&R CA-TF3 from San Diego Fire and Rescue Department and 29 personnel from California Regional TF6 San Bernardino County Fire Department joined the response efforts in Butte County.
http://www.oesnews.com/california-urban ... -disaster/
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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#234

Post by arock » Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:30 pm

We seem to have, in each of us, an invincible charity, a desire to help others that intensifies in a crisis. That desire coupled with a great need and an ambitious idea is what led Jose Andrés to found World Central Kitchen after the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. Since Haiti, Andrés has expanded globally and created a network of chefs to address food needs during disasters as well as provide solutions to the ongoing crisis of hunger and poverty.

His group is lean, nimble, and organized. They can mobilize more quickly than the government and get fresh, hot meals where they are needed most. After Hurricane Maria, Andres served 36 million meals in Puerto Rico from 25 emergency kitchens, staffed by 19,000 volunteers. Now his team is in Chico to help feed 4,000 firefighters and 60,000 Camp Fire evacuees. Saturday, they provided fresh meals to everyone in the Walmart parking lot.

Working out of the kitchens of Paul Lema, owner of The Italian Guy Catering in Chico, a robust and enthusiastic group of volunteers is serving the first hot meals to shelters on Sunday night. The menu is smoked pork loin, fresh broccoli and mashed potatoes with a vegan option.

The kitchen smells marvelous as teams slice the roasts, portion the mashed potatoes and pack the broccoli into shiny foil roasters. Another group packs the covered roasters into insulated carriers that are loaded by Red Cross volunteers into Red Cross trucks to be delivered to shelters all over town.

One truck is going to the Gridley fairgrounds, another to the Neighborhood Church, and so forth.

As we watch, a huge refrigerated trailer is backed into several parking spaces, leaving room for another even larger one to store frozen and perishable food. After the meals have been delivered, chef Jason goes to each shelter to check on quantities — is more food needed? More or less vegan entrees? This way they can calculate the food they need to prepare and prevent waste.

World Center Kitchen runs on donations and volunteers. They try not to lean on the community they are serving by asking for food donations, as those resources are already stressed. They will accept food donations from farmers that have excess produce due to restaurant closings and other disaster-related circumstances.
. . .
In the “party room” of Italian Guy Catering, hundreds of sack lunches are being packed by volunteers. These will be driven up to the fire lines for firemen and first responders.
. . .
Named one of Time Magazine’s “100 Most Influential People” in both 2012 and 2018 and awarded “Outstanding Chef” and “Humanitarian of the Year” by the James Beard Foundation, Andrés is an internationally recognized culinary innovator.
https://www.chicoer.com/2018/11/13/swee ... e-victims/ November 12, 2018


tgiving together.JPG
https://www.signupgenius.com/go/70a0b49 ... nksgiving1
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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#235

Post by arock » Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:34 pm

PC Home Defense Home Kit

Homeowners can now better protect their homes and property from wildfire. Phos-Chek Home Defense, an uncolored version of the same fire retardant used by the USDA Forest Service, is now available to homeowners. Home Defense can be sprayed using most simple garden sprayers. The product is available as a concentrate or ready to use mixture.

The Home Defense Home Kit includes two pails of Home Defense fire retardant concentrate and sprayer.

Used along with Firewise principles, Phos-Chek Home Defense can significantly increase your home’s safety during a wildfire. The product is safe and effective when used properly.
https://phoschek.com/product/pc-home-defense-home-kit/

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#236

Post by arock » Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:44 pm

Since it ignited on November 8, 2018, the fatal Woolsey Fire has burned at least 96,000 acres in Southern California. While the fire is still burning, a NASA-funded project is providing extensive satellite information to help agency fire managers understand the active wildfire and plan for recovery.

NASA’s Rehabilitation Capability Convergence for Ecosystem Recovery (RECOVER) is an online mapping tool that pulls together data on 26 different variables such as burn severity, land slope, vegetation, and soil type. In the past, fire managers might need several days or weeks to assemble and present such a large amount of information. Funded by NASA’s Applied Science Program, RECOVER does so in five minutes, with the help of sophisticated server technologies that gather data from a multitude of sources.

The speedy release of data—sometimes while the fire is still occurring—allows fire managers to start rehabilitation plans earlier and implement recovery efforts quickly. Much of the data for RECOVER comes from the Landsat 8 satellite, NASA’s Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments on NASA’s Terra and Aqua satellites. Some data layers also come from partner agencies like the U.S. Geological Survey, Bureau of Land Management, and U.S. Forest Service.

The image above is a preliminary burn severity map for the Woolsey Fire, as posted by RECOVER on November 15, 2018. Burn severity maps help determine the amount of ecological change in an area, such as vegetation loss, after a fire. This satellite-derived data layer—called the burned area reflectance classification—was produced by the U.S. Forest Service and available in the RECOVER system. This preliminary burn severity map is expected to change because the fire is still burning.
Looking to RECOVER After the Fire
woolsey burn severity.JPG
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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#237

Post by arock » Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:58 pm

In case you haven't read an article about the Camp Fire . . . harrowing stories, good detail.
Before there was a spark, there was the wind.

On the morning of Nov. 8, as the sun rose over the isolated mountains in the Sierra Nevada, gale-force winds tore through the canyon. A fire outpost on the Feather River recorded blasts of 52 mph — a bad omen in a national forest that hadn’t had a satisfying rain since May.

From his station bunk at the head of Jarbo Gap, Capt. Matt McKenzie of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection woke to the sound of pine needles pelting the roof.

At 6:15 a.m., a Pacific Gas & Electric Co. high-voltage line near the Poe Dam generating station six miles away malfunctioned. A report of fire came at 6:29.

Fifteen minutes later, McKenzie stood at the dam looking helplessly across the river canyon at a 10-acre fire on the rock slope above. He had no way to reach it. Its unpaved access route, Camp Creek Road, clung to the mountain so precariously that rock slides threatened to erase it.

The last time he put a heavy wildland engine on the crumbling grade, it took an hour to creep a mile, mirrors folded in, a man walking beside each wheel to watch for collapse. It would be a death sentence to send a crew out there in a fire.

California’s professional wildfire strike forces make a regular practice of killing small grass fires — stomping thousands into anonymity each year. But this one was being lashed by a canyon vortex locals call the Jarbo wind.
California fire: What started as a tiny brush fire became the state’s deadliest wildfire. Here’s how



And, the nurse that Lani posted about in the Fire! thread: Toyota is giving him a new truck.

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#238

Post by arock » Tue Nov 20, 2018 12:51 am

A long story --audio version at the link -- about fire in a different part of the country. And the important role volunteer firefighters play in so many communities.
The Day the Great Plains Burned
Alerts had been going out for weeks that conditions in Oklahoma, Kansas, and Texas were perfect for wildfires.
On March 6, 2017, the prairie went up in flames.

By Ian Frazier

Slapout, Oklahoma, at the intersection of a county road and a much used east-west state highway, has a population of five. The town’s name used to be Nye, but in the nineteen-fifties its residents, who were then more numerous, changed it. Locals explain that there was a store in Nye where, if you asked the owner for a particular item, he often went to look for it and came back and said, “We’re slap out of it!” How this inspired a name change no one knows. Now the store is gone, and the town consists of a single building that’s a combination gas station, truck stop, convenience mart, café, and improvised community center. In the dark of early morning, it’s jumping with truckers, oil-field workers, guys who drive the county road graders, and farmers who have been baling hay all night. A hand-lettered sign on the door reads “Please hang on to the door.” This is so the howling prairie wind won’t keep yanking it open and undoing the feeling of comfort inside.

Just to the south on the county road stands the Slapout firehouse, a metal building with three bay doors and six enormous fire trucks behind them. These vehicles, acquired from the military and the forest service, have been modified for prairie firefighting by the firemen themselves, all of whom are volunteers. Charlie Starbuck is the fire chief. He objects to being called Charles; it’s Charlie on his birth certificate. Starbuck has a drooping, Emiliano Zapata mustache and green eyes and he wears overalls, end-of-the-nose spectacles, and a rumpled Army-fatigue hat. His father was a fire chief before him. On his muscled forearms are multiple reddish burns made by sparks from welding, a regular occupation at his ranch, not far from town, as well as at the firehouse.

On the morning of March 6, 2017, Starbuck’s pager went off at ten-fifty-three and informed him that a grass fire was burning in the Mocane oil field, by County Road 141 in Beaver County, north of Slapout. Its cause was a downed power line. With three trucks and eight of his crew, he drove to the fire and saw that it had already blown up to a size where, given the conditions, he was going to need help. He called neighboring fire departments. Texas County, just to the west, sent trucks—“I will praise Texas County till the day I die,” Starbuck says. He also called Mark Goeller, the director of Oklahoma Forestry Services, who, needing a name for the fire, used Starbuck’s. Sometime afterward, Starbuck’s sister in Virginia called him to ask about the Starbuck Fire she had heard mentioned on the news. That was the first he learned of his fame.

For weeks, the National Weather Service out of Norman, Oklahoma, Amarillo, Texas, and Dodge City, Kansas, had been sending alerts. The conditions were perfect for wildfires. There had been almost no precipitation for six months; before that, however, a lot of rain had fallen, and now the plentiful prairie grasses stood up tall and tinder-dry. On some days, like this one, the winds blew at fifty-plus miles an hour, while the humidity dipped down into the single digits. An ice storm in January had damaged scores of power lines, making them more vulnerable. Often, the Weather Service alerts are mainly precautionary. But on this day the south-central Great Plains did indeed catch fire. Huge wildfires spread over the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles and in western Kansas, with a smaller burn in Colorado.

This is a part of the world where extreme weather hangs out. Meteorologists refer to the prevailing late-winter “dry line,” a phenomenon found almost nowhere else, which in this case is produced by hot, dry air from the Mexican plateau colliding with moist air moving up from the Gulf of Mexico. In March and April, if there’s an incoming storm system as a trigger, the combination of wet and dry explodes above the plains. High winds generated by the dry line contributed to some of the dust storms of the nineteen-thirties. Plowed ground on the plains blew away during those years; later, the government encouraged agriculture that returned the land to grass. The big dust storms haven’t reappeared since, but now when the winds come the grass holding the soil in place is sometimes thoroughly ready to burn.
The New Yorker https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018 ... ins-burned

Edit: Fixed typo

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#239

Post by arock » Tue Nov 20, 2018 1:02 am

From "U.S. Fire Department Profile - 2015" published in 2017 by the National Fire Protection Association. Excludes wildland firefighters.


NPFA abstract.JPG
https://www.nfpa.org/-/media/Files/News ... rofile.pdf

Summary Graphic Fact Sheet: https://www.nfpa.org/-/media/Files/News ... tsheet.pdf
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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#240

Post by Kendra » Tue Nov 20, 2018 8:56 am

:boxing:

Maddow's 11/20 opener is a nice 5 minute smack down of Trump's CA visit.

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#241

Post by arock » Tue Nov 20, 2018 12:08 pm

Let's start the day with beer.
You should go buy Resilience.

You won’t get that kind of advice very often in this space, but this isn’t actually about beer. It’s about Paradise and the deadly wildfire that killed dozens of Californians.

Sierra Nevada, the largest craft brewery in California, has a plan to raise millions of dollars for victims of the fire with its new Resilience IPA. Last week, Sierra Nevada owner Ken Grossman asked every brewery in the country to brew their own batches of Resilience. Even better, Sierra Nevada secured donations of hops and grain, so every penny of every four-pack, six-pack, crowler, growler and draft sale can go to fire victims.

Sierra Nevada got the idea from Russian River, the famed Santa Rosa brewery that came up with a similar plan after last year’s deadly fire in that town.
Sacrameto Bee Beer column: Local beer makers brew up a fundraiser with Sierra Nevada for fire victims

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#242

Post by arock » Tue Nov 20, 2018 12:24 pm



I've been looking at photos similar to this one from a number of fires and wondering why the trees survived as well as they have. In this article, several fire investigators discuss their take on the Camp Fire, how fire often moves through residential areas (embers vs flames), the importance of creating defensible space.
Driving toward Paradise on the afternoon of Nov. 8, Jonathan Pangburn was less worried about the flames burning through the forest than he was about the smoke. Black and thick, it billowed over the road like a dangerous fog, cutting visibility to less than three feet in places.

A member of the incident management team with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, Pangburn knew the signs. Gray smoke meant vegetation. Black smoke meant homes, possibly entire city blocks. The Camp fire was no longer just a wildland fire.

“It was an urban conflagration,” Pangburn said. “It was structure-to-structure-to-structure ignition that carried the fire through this community.”

Located in the Sierra foothills at an elevation that favored Ponderosa pines, Paradise might have seemed susceptible to the ravages of a forest fire. But what Pangburn realized is that the Camp fire had changed its character upon entering the town — and in that revelation lay the hope for preventing tragedies such as this from happening again.

Fires that spread from house to house generate a force of their own. Embers, broadcast by the wind, find dry leaves, igniting one structure then another, and the cycle is perpetuated block after block. Break that cycle and the fire quits, and destruction can be minimized.
Los Angeles Times Thousands of homes incinerated but trees still standing: Paradise fire’s monstrous path

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#243

Post by arock » Tue Nov 20, 2018 5:11 pm

Supercomputers Assist Firefighters As Wildfires Spread In California

. . .
Today, fire agencies predict how a fire will move by looking at the weather, terrain and fuel moisture, as well as by relying on the decades of experience of fire analysts.

"This is an inexact science that is having to be done during the middle of an emergency," says Cox [a division chief with Cal Fire]. "So it can be extremely difficult to get a really precise idea of where a fire is going."

Many fire agencies also use basic software on laptops that can produce projections of the fire. Such tools have been available for about a decade.

But in recent years, the availability of real-time fire data has ballooned. NASA satellites are providing detailed images of fire perimeters. Weather station, field cameras and aerial reconnaissance flights provide even more.

For that kind of data, a supercomputer can be a big help.
NPR https://www.npr.org/2018/11/18/66884724 ... in-califor Audio available at link.

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#244

Post by arock » Tue Nov 20, 2018 5:19 pm

California's next governor hopes to get the jump on fires by expanding the state's high-tech early warning camera system
  • California Gov.-elect Gavin Newsom's high-tech plan to fight wildfires, which he outlined during the campaign, is now getting renewed attention, with the state facing longer and more devastating fire seasons.
  • Some experts have called the project a "game-changer."
  • PG&E, the parent company of the Pacific Gas & Electric utility unit, is expected to become a major player in the early warning camera expansion, CNBC has learned.
. . .
During the campaign, Newsom touted the value of tech solutions for wildfires as the danger from a year-round fire season and drought-parched land grew. This includes artificial intelligence as well as early warning infrared cameras around the state that can spot wildfires and enable quick response by firefighters.

The early warning fire camera network exists today, but with fewer than 80 of the infrared cameras statewide. They have already proven their worth by allowing fire managers and others to spot blazes early to keep them from spreading. The number of cameras on the network is expected to grow more than sixfold over the next four years and cover thousands of square miles of fire-prone areas, including forests and rangelands.

PG&E spokeswoman Mayra Tostado tells CNBC the utility has a goal of having 600 cameras by 2022, covering roughly 90 percent of its service territory. The San Francisco-based utility already has funded some of the camera technology in the North Bay region.

PG&E's camera system is a collaboration with several academic organizations, including the University of California San Diego and the University of Nevada-Reno. It is part of the West Coast's AlertWildfire.org site, which features live video, time-lapse and pan-tilt-zoom function cameras that can be controlled by fire managers and other key response personnel.
CNBC https://www.cnbc.com/2018/11/16/califor ... -grow.html

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#245

Post by arock » Tue Nov 20, 2018 5:31 pm

Mostly a round-up old vs should-be-using-newer technology, people who didn't sign up, suggestion to get NOAA weather radio, slightly increased use of warning messages without specific event.
Disaster after disaster, California keeping falling short on evacuating people from harm’s way

. . .
More than 140 people have died in California over the last 13 months from various calamities, ranging from the fires in wine country to the mudslides in Montecito.

In many of these disasters, officials have acknowledged flaws in the evacuation plans, including the failure to use the latest technology to broadcast Amber Alert-style warnings on cellphones ahead of deadly disasters.

But when the worst fire in California history moved into Paradise this month, the evacuation plan fell short, with officials using an older alert system that reached only a fraction of the town instead of the federal government’s Wireless Emergency Alert system, known as WEA, which would have reached far more people.

“In both the [wine country] fire and the [Paradise] fire, if you look at the growing number of fatalities — they were people who were in their house or running to their car. That’s indicative of a population that was never alerted. They didn’t see anything on their TV, radio, nothing,” said Thomas Cova, director of University of Utah’s Center for Natural and Technological Hazards. “We are not using all the tools we could to communicate with people.”
Los Angeles Times https://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la- ... story.html

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#246

Post by arock » Tue Nov 20, 2018 10:16 pm

camp fire 11-20.JPG

This is +2 fatalities.


Butte Co Sheriff 11-20.JPG



Woolsey Fire: more areas repopulated today. Burn severity maps released, with concerns about upcoming storm (predictions for much less rain than Northern California).


Edit: Added info from Butte County Sheriff
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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#247

Post by Estiveo » Wed Nov 21, 2018 12:23 pm

Finally, some breathable air this morning. AQI OF 53. Lots of green and yellow on the map. And rain in the forecast.
Screenshot_2018-11-21-09-12-13.jpg
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#248

Post by NMgirl » Wed Nov 21, 2018 1:04 pm

Estiveo wrote:
Wed Nov 21, 2018 12:23 pm
Finally, some breathable air this morning. AQI OF 53. Lots of green and yellow on the map. And rain in the forecast.

Screenshot_2018-11-21-09-12-13.jpg
Such a relief! I admit we were out-and-about by foot even at 244, although masked. But our darling 6th grandlovie was born early, on the 16th, and I’ve been so worried about her this past week.
Stern: Come back. My posts are becoming sloppy and ill-thought out.

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RTH10260
Posts: 21369
Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2010 8:52 am
Location: Near the Swiss Alps

Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#249

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Nov 21, 2018 5:31 pm

Juan Brown interviews the nurse who made dangerous evacuations out of Paradise

ETA: the nurse interview will be in a clip to come, thise one has only the drive thru the remains of Paradise.


arock
Posts: 490
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 8:27 am

Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#250

Post by arock » Wed Nov 21, 2018 10:56 pm

Camp Fire Press Briefing this evening.

Sheriff Honea's update:

2,052 accounted for (up 188 from yesterday)
563 unaccounted for (down 307 from yesterday)

2 additional sets of human remains were located today, total is now 83. One found in a Paradise structure, the other in a Magalia structure.

58 are tentatively identified, awaiting DNA confirmation.

830 searchers and K9s will be out tomorrow (Thanksgiving), along with 204 law enforcement and National Guard protecting evacuated areas.


==
Cal Fire

153,336 acres. 85% contained. 2,042 personnel.

13,503 single family residences destroyed
18,431 all types destroyed
structure survey is 98% complete

minimal fire activity. In anticipation of rain that started today, they have been working hard at fire suppression repair the last few days.

although it's raining, strike teams in place, especially for structure protection

==
County District Attorney:

Talked about price-gouging laws (not more than 10% higher), tip line (more tips have been false so far).

Be alert for rental scams (person not authorized to rent unit but will take money); gofundme and charity scams; phone scams asking for personal information, claiming to be insurance, sheriff's list rep, etc.

11 cases of looters, mostly vehicles and motor homes left in evacuation area. Law enforcement has also confiscated a number of guns, including a fully automatic machine gun, from people illegally in evacuated areas.

==
Town of Paradise Police Chief:

When town is cleared to allow residents in, the plan is for 24-hour notice for each area as it's opened. For first 6-8 hours, only residents will be allowed in, giving them private time to visit property.

==
Family Support Center for relatives of deceased will open next week with representatives from several agencies to assist with:
funeral
legal
counseling
vital records

==
Butte County Health
There is evidence from recent fires in California that homes and property destroyed by fire contain high and concerning levels of heavy metals, lead, mercury, dioxin, arsenic, and other carcinogens. Some property may have the presence of radio-active materials. Exposure to hazardous substances may lead to acute and chronic health effects, and may cause long-term public health and environmental impacts.

As areas affected by the fire with destroyed homes and property are opened to residents, residents will have limited access to visit property to collect recognizable belongings and mementoes that may have survived the fire. Residents should review the Health and Safety Precaution for Re-entry packet, which will be distributed at controlled re-entry checkpoints.

The County is working with State and Federal partners who will assess each property for hazardous waste and remove those materials from each property. This process will take time. There is no estimate as to how long it will take to assess and remove hazardous materials from each property at this time. After the property has been cleared of hazardous waste, the property owner can sign-up for a State debris removal program at no cost to the property owner.
https://www.buttecounty.net/News-Announ ... d-Property

The Health Officer strongly discouraged people from living on destroyed property until clear of hazards and declared safe by health team.

==
Cal OES:

Priorities
1. Get everyone registered for assistance
2. Get everyone out of shelters/off streets (if they want) and into more permanent housing
3. Make community safe by removing hazardous items like propane tanks, batteries, asbestos, other substances (State and EPA teams will start doing this around Dec 2 and process may take a few months)

Once hazardous materials are removed, then ash and structural debris can be removed. Reminder that ash is considered toxic, i.e., please don't live on property after hazardous materials removed but before ash is removed.

==
FEMA:

15,000 households have registered for assistance

$9.2 million disbursed thus far as seed money; other sources that evacuees can work with: insurance, SBA, back to FEMA, non-profits.

If in shelter or outside and you register, you will probably get a hotel room.

Disaster Center open daily 9-7 (including Thanksgiving).

Each registered person/household will get a call (this was a head's up on scam warning) from a FEMA rep, who will need to meet in person, at place of evacuee's choice; rep will have a badge.

==
County school rep:

trying to get everyone back in a classroom by Dec 3; some families have moved away, contacting them to see if they'll be back

working on state waivers for testing missed, time off, etc.

arranging for short- and long-term trauma counseling

==
IMET - National Weather Service

6" rain total before end of Saturday
currently flash flood watch

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