Right-to-work Laws

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Addie
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Right-to-work Laws

#1

Post by Addie » Sat May 16, 2015 9:45 am

:cheer:



Chicago Sun-Times











Right-to-work goes down in flames in Illinois House with zero yes votes



Gov. Bruce Rauner’s desires to have right-to-work in Illinois went down in flames in the House on Thursday, gaining zero yes votes in a fiery debate Democrats aimed squarely at the governor.



The vote tally was 0 yes votes, 72 no votes and 37 voting present, offering a blistering rebuke to Rauner’s anti-union agenda. A handful of Republicans went for a walk during the vote, not publicly falling on one side or another.



Republicans dismissed the vote as political theater even as Democrats pit workers’ rights against corporate greed and called Rauner “divisive” for touring the state and essentially asking local towns to kick unions out. ...



Rauner’s office countered that Madigan and Democrats were walking away from the negotiating table by plucking out controversial issues and voting them down. In the Capitol on Thursday, Rauner dismissed the notion that a vote on right-to-work was meant to embarrass the governor, who has made it his marquee issue since he was sworn into office in January.


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Addie
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Re: Right-to-work Laws

#2

Post by Addie » Sat Jan 07, 2017 3:28 pm

HuffPo
Kentucky Republicans Pass Right-To-Work, Dropping The Hammer On Unions

Organized labor suffered its first major legislative setback due to the 2016 elections on Saturday, when Kentucky Republicans gave final approval to right-to-work legislation and repealed the state’s prevailing wage law. Both bills are expected to be signed into law by the governor, and will take effect immediately.

Kentucky is the last holdout in the South without an anti-union right-to-work law on the books. For decades, labor unions and Democrats fended off such measures, which diminish union membership and weaken the labor movement. But when Republicans captured the state House in November, they paved the way for passage of the legislation. The law will apply to all new labor contracts, but will not affect current agreements.

Unions and Democrats mounted a last-ditch effort to stop the legislation this week, holding protests at the state capitol building in Frankfort saying the bills would drive down wages. But Republicans now have overwhelming control of both the state Senate and the House. Kentucky’s governor, Matt Bevin, is a Republican who won office in 2015.

“They’re cutting workers’ pay,” Bill Finn, state director of the Kentucky State Building and Construction Trades Council, told The Huffington Post this week. “People voted for a change in this election, but they didn’t vote for this. They didn’t vote for pay cuts.”

Right-to-work laws forbid contracts that require all workers in a particular bargaining unit to pay fees to a union. Under U.S. labor law, a union must represent all employees in a unionized workplace, even those who may not want representation. Unions argue it’s only fair that all workers share the costs of bargaining and maintaining the union contract.


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Addie
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Re: Right-to-work Laws

#3

Post by Addie » Mon Jan 22, 2018 7:27 pm

The Nation
How the Right’s War on Unions Is Killing the Democratic Party

“Right-to-work” laws have a measurable effect on voting patterns.

In recent years, Republicans have dramatically intensified their war on organized labor. The battle plan was simple: Pass laws that limit union political spending and make it more difficult to collect dues. Since 2010, six states have passed “right-to-work” laws, meaning that workers can benefit from union representation without paying to keep the union funded. In other states, Republican legislatures have hamstrung public-sector unions by denying them collective-bargaining power.

Everyone remembers the high-profile battle in Wisconsin that Governor Scott Walker launched in 2011, but the union-busting efforts have not slowed down. In 2017, Missouri and then Kentucky’s right-to-work laws were rammed through within weeks of Republicans’ gaining power, and Iowa successfully limited the collective-bargaining power of public-sector unions. There was a push to do the same in New Hampshire, though it failed.

Few of these battles drew the same attention as what happened in Wisconsin, particularly after Donald Trump’s carnival began dominating news coverage. But there is good reason to believe that all these efforts will profoundly change the future of American politics.

In a new study that will soon be released as a National Bureau of Economic Research working paper, James Feigenbaum of Boston University, Alexander Hertel-Fernandez of Columbia, and Vanessa Williamson of the Brookings Institution examined the long-term political consequences of anti-union legislation by comparing counties straddling a state line where one state is right-to-work and another is not. Their findings should strike terror into the hearts of Democratic Party strategists: Right-to-work laws decreased Democratic presidential vote share by 3.5 percent.


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Re: Right-to-work Laws

#4

Post by Dan1100 » Mon Jan 22, 2018 7:58 pm

One of the first things Missouri's new Republican governor did after he unpacked all his bondage gear was to pass a Right to Work law.

They have already collected enough signatures to put repealing it on the November 2018 ballot.

Should help drive Democratic turnout and help McCaskill.

http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/govt ... 6b2ec.html


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Re: Right-to-work Laws

#5

Post by dunstvangeet » Mon Jan 22, 2018 8:24 pm

Dan1100 wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 7:58 pm
One of the first things Missouri's new Republican governor did after he unpacked all his bondage gear was to pass a Right to Work law.

They have already collected enough signatures to put repealing it on the November 2018 ballot.

Should help drive Democratic turnout and help McCaskill.

http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/govt ... 6b2ec.html
The only problem is it may be moot by the November 2018 ballot. The Supreme Court is deciding a case which will implement right-to-work nation-wide, and I think that case will pass, 5-4 for the right-to-work law. The case is Janus v. AFSCME. And that is the case that will basically implement right-to-work nationwide, making it unconstitutional to not have a right-to-work law. That's scheduled to come out in June.



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Re: Right-to-work Laws

#6

Post by Addie » Wed May 09, 2018 2:21 pm

Cross-posting

Bloomberg
Democrats Take Aim at the Gig Economy

Leading Democrats are proposing a labor law overhaul that could extend collective bargaining rights to huge swaths of the gig economy, the latest sign of gathering blowback for companies committed to maximizing profits by denying workers rights and benefits often associated with regular employment.

On Wednesday, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent who caucuses with the Democrats, is scheduled to introduce a bill that would make major changes to the 1935 National Labor Relations Act, including making it easier for workers to prove they are employees with the right to unionize and negotiate collectively with management. Organizing rights are among a suite of protections that U.S. laws grant employees, but not independent contractors, who also lack minimum wage, overtime, and anti-harassment protections.

The Senate proposal would ban state “right-to-work” laws—pro-management statutes that weaken unions by barring agreements that impose union fees on all employees the union represents. It would also give workers the option to unionize by signing up only a majority of co-workers rather than through secret ballot votes that often figure in allegations of corporate coercion and manipulation.

Such labor-friendly legislation is, of course, dead on arrival in a Republican-controlled Congress. Moreover, Obama-era Labor Department guidance setting forth a broader view of who is an employee under current law was scrapped last year under President Donald Trump. But for gig employers, the Sanders bill is nevertheless a warning of things potentially to come—especially as the midterm election campaign begins in earnest.

The Senate proposal by Sanders is backed by major unions and co-sponsored by other potential 2020 presidential candidates, including Democratic Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, Kamala Harris of California and Sherrod Brown of Ohio. It signifies an approach that could get a serious hearing if Democrats take control of one or both houses of Congress come November, let alone the White House in 2020.
Adding:
WaPo: Bernie Sanders has a new plan to raise wages: Save the unions
The Guardian: Bernie Sanders introduces Senate bill protecting employees fired for union organizing
The Hill: Sanders unveils plan to bolster labor unions


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