Labor Union Growth

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Addie
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Labor Union Growth

#1

Post by Addie » Thu Jan 24, 2013 2:48 pm

[link]Los Angeles Times,http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-c ... 5664.story[/link]





California unions grow, bucking U.S. trend





The latest snapshot of the U.S. working class shows that unions are in trouble, their ranks thinning amid a backlash against organized labor and a still sputtering economy.





But California and a few nearby states in the Southwest are showing a vastly different picture — labor's ranks are on an upswing. The Golden State's union organizers signed up more than 100,000 new members last year, while the nation as a whole shed 400,000, according to data released Wednesday.





The reason: Latino workers.





After working hard to get here, many Latino immigrants demand respect in the workplace and are more willing to join unions in a tough economic environment, organizers say.


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Labor Union Growth

#2

Post by TollandRCR » Sat May 18, 2013 1:37 pm

Los Angeles Times May 16, 2013 [link]White-collar workers are turning to labor unions,http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-u ... 8842.story[/link]


At one time, professional workers were encouraged to give input to management to improve the way companies are run. Now they are treated like cogs on the wheel, regardless of the amount of experience or the number of degrees they have under their belt, said Paul Shearon, secretary-treasurer of the federation. "Their level of influence has really diminished, and it's had a dramatic impact on their workplace environments," he said.





Many professionals have pricey educations and are more sensitive to unequal distributions of wealth. That's made them more willing to speak out about inequality at the workplace, said Harley Shaiken, a professor at Berkeley who specializes in labor issues.


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Labor Union Growth

#3

Post by Addie » Sat May 18, 2013 1:48 pm

Good to see, Tollie.


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Labor Union Growth

#4

Post by TollandRCR » Sun May 26, 2013 8:01 pm

Does anybody have a suggestion for a paperback that I could distribute to incoming members of the executive committee of a faculty union that would inspire them to think that unions can accomplish good things? Many universities are experiencing some loss of shared governance as the idea of the managerial university takes root, with its focus on efficiency, economy, and effectiveness. Faculty are the annoying people who question decisions that administrators make, [link]often pointing out serious omissions and questionable assumptions,http://articles.courant.com/2013-05-14/ ... san-herbst[/link].





It is hard to move faculties to act as bodies. They pay attention to negotiations every few years about merit pay, benefits, and retirement, but the faculty union is not readily seen as an agent for change in defining the mission of the university, improving its administration, and in general protecting the rights of faculty members to govern the curriculum of the university.





I had thought of Alinsky's Rules for Radicals, but it is about general strategy for achieving change, not about unions as means for doing that. AAUP Unionism: Principles and Goals is solid but uninspiring. The members of the committee would read the former but not the latter.





I don't think it is particularly important that the book be about academic unions, but it probably ought to be about professional unions. Any suggestions appreciated.


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Labor Union Growth

#5

Post by Plutodog » Sun May 26, 2013 9:15 pm

Rules and Reveille for Radicals are both about institutional change organizations, which a union most definitely is. What's more, they're most specifically about how unions and other instituions go about organizing for power. I think both books are primary sources. For greatest effect, unions can be more powerful for both the university and the community if they get together with other local institutions including churches and self-advocacy support groups. Power that only supports the university faculty whilst there are those left outside who are getting nowhere and see the faculty as only out for themselves whilst everyone else suffers tend to have higher hills to climb and problems maintaining a unity that leaves others out in the cold. Of course, it takes work and involvement and the tendency of unions to support political parties rather than rank and file worker issues is also a destructive to unity. See the Industrial Area Foundation, Alinsky's organization. They also have educational video, as I recall. They're otherwise a resource too, and may help organize. But that requires a committment and funding from a good segment of the group.


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#6

Post by TollandRCR » Sun May 26, 2013 9:40 pm

...For greatest effect, unions can be more powerful for both the university and the community if they get together with other local institutions including churches and self-advocacy support groups. Power that only supports the university faculty whilst there are those left outside who are getting nowhere and see the faculty as only out for themselves whilst everyone else suffers tend to have higher hills to climb and problems maintaining a unity that leaves others out in the cold. ...Agreed. The direction that I want to see us take is to be for the students. Even "bargain" public universities with respectable scholarship programs are out of range of many families -- and of the increasingly common young person who has little or no family and must work. I teach at night because I pick up lots of students who work full time during the day. It is more than tuition, room, and board that keeps kids out. It is also an average of over $1,000 in textbook costs per year, much higher in certain disciplines. It is the foregone income, which to many families seems a deal breaker. It is even the required clothes and shoes; we mostly don't have snobs as students, but at that age some things are simply not done. At one time universities were understood to be public goods from which the entire body politic benefited. Today the costs of public universities are increasingly pushed onto the students and their families. Maybe in addition to "Next Generation Connecticut" and its high-tech dreams, we also need (or need instead) a project to bring a university education back into reach for every willing and capable student. Don't get me started on administrators' salaries and perks -- and the sheer number of such people.


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#7

Post by A Legal Lohengrin » Sun May 26, 2013 9:51 pm

Of course, it takes work and involvement and the tendency of unions to support political parties rather than rank and file worker issues is also a destructive to unity. See the Industrial Area Foundation, Alinsky's organization. They also have educational video, as I recall. They're otherwise a resource too, and may help organize. But that requires a committment and funding from a good segment of the group.I am fully agreed on unions and their far too cozy relationship with the government and with political parties. It has led to corruption. Having become ineffective at representing worker's interests, and far more concerned with maintaining their own perks, they essentially act as a way of corralling worker energy that was previously used in things like wildcat strikes and boycotts and other more effective actions. In return for a cut of the pie, unions agree to control workers and dampen their more vigorous strategies. This was partly why now entirely-dysfunctional entities like the National Labor Relations Board were created in the first place, to prevent the strategies that most disrupted capitalist activities.Having become increasingly ineffective at actually protecting the interests of workers, unions have become far less popular and enjoy far less support. The results have been catastrophic for workers. I feel that nothing short of a return to vigorous and direct worker action to further their own interests, including organization on a macro level that would enable things like general strikes and other genuinely disruptive actions, will return the power to workers.There are, of course, still some professional unions that have clout. The Screen Actors Guild and the Writers Guild of America come to mind as two professional labor organizations that can still basically shut down an industry at will and get real concessions for their members. The power to do this requires that most members actually will make sacrifices, even very tough ones, to stand behind the union. To get this trust, the union, which is basically its members, must also stand behind the individual member when a strike means times of no income. Those who can give to fellow strikers must be willing to do so. Legal costs and simple costs of living must be shared.In a word, socialism.I admit I am a lot more inspired by labor unions like the old Industrial Workers of the World than most professional unions, which are largely able to be effective because of their professional or even elite status. The IWW was a real union. Most of the current unions simply don't measure up, largely because they have sold out to the establishment. They are better than no union at all, but they simply do not stick it to the pigs.I think the pigs need to be given a taste of some real socialism. The only other option is to settle meekly for increasingly grim and impoverished circumstances for ourselves and our children as we sink into serfdom.



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Labor Union Growth

#8

Post by Addie » Sun May 26, 2013 9:57 pm

I don't know how leftish you want to go, Tolland, but I liked very much False Promises: The Shaping of American Working Class Consciousness by Stanley Aronowitz. He also wrote The Knowledge Factory: Dismantling the Corporate University and Creating True Higher Learning, which I have not read.


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#9

Post by TollandRCR » Sun May 26, 2013 10:07 pm

From 1995 to 1999, the IWW General Headquarters was on West Michigan Avenue in Ypsilanti, MI. It was an interesting place to visit while I lived in Ann Arbor. Plus around there was a Mom and Mom Mexican restaurant with about six tables with food that was otherwise unheard of in Michigan.The IWW has a thing about cats:


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#10

Post by Estiveo » Mon May 27, 2013 12:10 am

From 1995 to 1999, the IWW General Headquarters was on West Michigan Avenue in Ypsilanti, MI. It was an interesting place to visit while I lived in Ann Arbor. Plus around there was a Mom and Mom Mexican restaurant with about six tables with food that was otherwise unheard of in Michigan.The IWW has a thing about cats:Waitaminit...Jonathon Levy, Esq. PDQ, BBQ, WTF, Cabindan something or other, used that as his avatar, dint he?


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#11

Post by TollandRCR » Mon May 27, 2013 8:21 am

Off Topic
Jonathan Levy is one of the more interesting people to have worked with Orly Taitz ESQUIRE. Oddly, today's NESARA- REPUBLIC RESTORED - Galactic News is carrying a story about one of Levy's law suits against the Vatican Bank. Monday, May 27, 2013 [link]VATICAN BANK SUED FOR ALLEGED WAR CRIMES,http://nesaranews.blogspot.com/2013/05/ ... rimes.html[/link] by Sherman H. Skolnick. Skolnick died in 2006. The case reported is Emil Alperin et al. vs. Vatican Bank et al., No. 99 C 4941, U.S. District Court, Northern District of California, filed 11/15/99. The case was dismissed by the Circuit Court, and Levy appealed to the Ninth Circuit, which in 2009 [link]upheld the decision of the Circuit Court,http://cdn.ca9.uscourts.gov/datastore/m ... -16060.pdf[/link]. [link]An out-of-date Wikipedia article,http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alperin_v._Vatican_Bank[/link] pretends that the case is still alive. The plaintiffs have tried to tie this case into the sex abuse scandal so that the Vatican could be sued in U.S. courts.


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#12

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Mon May 27, 2013 12:09 pm

Professional unions have their prima donnas, and that cost American actors a lot in the last decade.The SAG and AFTRA boards voted to consolidate in 2003. AFTRA members did live TV and commercials. SAG actors did theatrical movies and episodic TV back then. AFTRA members were heavily in favor of it (75%) and their snooty brethren at SAG were not (42%).The failure to consolidate weakened SAG's health plan (the best non working-conditions-related benefit) and caused those benefits to be restricted and eventually denied to the majority of SAG members, who needed another job other than acting to make ends meet. Television producers seized the opportunity of a weakened union and renegotiated its contracts with AFTRA, driving SAG out of profitable television.In 2012 the SAG snobs came to their senses and the two unions consolidated, but not before enormous damage was done to the welfare of SAG members. Things are still not where they were in 2003 and probably never will be. All because 58% of the members of SAG in 2003 thought they were better than their live TV and commercial performers.
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Labor Union Growth

#13

Post by Addie » Wed Jul 16, 2014 11:16 am

[link]AFSCME,http://www.afscme.org/blog/afscme-adds- ... 00-members[/link]





AFSCME Adds More Than 90,000 Members





CHICAGO – AFSCME Pres. Lee Saunders today announced that, even in the face of attacks from anti-worker politicians, billionaires and judges across the country (including the United States Supreme Court), AFSCME gained more than 90,000 new members during the past six months.





AFSCME nearly doubled the goal set in early January 2014 when the union launched its “50,000 Stronger” organizing campaign.





“Today, we are 92,155 members stronger, with new members from EMTs to home care workers, and we will continue our fight for the middle class and the future of this country,” Saunders said.





“Our opponents want to deplete the labor movement of resources, steal our power and silence our voices. They are even undercutting the most fundamental right we have as Americans: the right to vote. Yet, no matter the challenges that face us, the answer remains the same: Organize. Organize. Organize. ”





Included in the 90,000-plus new members are more than 20,000 home care workers, who were the target of the National Right to Work Committee funded lawsuit, Harris v. Quinn, which was recently decided by the U.S. Supreme Court. These caregivers joined AFSCME to protect quality care for children, seniors and people with disabilities.


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Re: Labor Union Growth

#14

Post by Addie » Mon Aug 17, 2015 10:35 am

Growth in public approval:

Associated Press
Americans' Support for Labor Unions Continues to Recover

PRINCETON, N.J. -- Americans' approval of labor unions has jumped five percentage points to 58% over the past year, and is now at its highest point since 2008, when 59% approved. In the interim, the image of organized labor had suffered, sinking to an all-time low of 48% in 2009.

Gallup first asked Americans about organized labor in 1936, a year after Congress legalized private-sector unions and collective bargaining. At that time, 72% of Americans approved of unions. Support remained high into the 1960s, but then dipped through the 1970s until it reached 55% in 1979. It has since varied, reaching as high as 66% in 1999 and as low as the 48% in 2009.

The latest results are from the 2015 installment of Gallup's annual Work and Education survey, conducted Aug. 5-9.

Consistent with the recent increase in approval of unions, the percentage of Americans saying they would like labor unions to have more influence in the country has also been rising, and now stands at 37%, up from 25% in 2009. Meanwhile, the percentage wanting unions to have less influence has declined from 42% to 35%, although it remains higher than it was from 1999 through 2008. Instead, fewer today say they want unions' influence to stay the same.
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Re: Labor Union Growth

#15

Post by Addie » Sun Jan 21, 2018 1:44 pm

Associated Press
Los Angeles Times loses publisher, gets union ...

On Friday, a National Labor Relations Board tally found that newsroom workers voted 248 to 44 for representation by NewsGuild-Communications Workers of America. The vote was taken on Jan. 4.

The union must now negotiate for a collective bargaining agreement. The union said it will seek better pay and benefits as well as "pay equity for women and people of color, greater diversity and better working conditions" for reporters, copy editors, graphic artists and photographers.

"This was a long time coming, and we're all thrilled that this has finally happened," Kristina Bui, a Times copy editor and union organizer, told the newspaper. "The newsroom has put up with so much disruption and mismanagement, and this vote just underscores how much of a say we need to have in the decision-making process. The newsroom is demanding a seat at the bargaining table." ...

Tronc fought Times organizing efforts. A day before the vote, the paper's editor-in-chief and former interim executive editor sent employees an email arguing that "a union won't solve most of the problems endemic to our industry."

Most major news organizations in the United States, including The Associated Press, are unionized and digital media such as the Huffington Post also have seen successful organizing efforts.


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Re: Labor Union Growth

#16

Post by Addie » Tue Feb 06, 2018 2:54 pm

The Nation
Millennials Are Keeping Unions Alive

Jobs are precarious, health-care costs are skyrocketing, and wages aren’t keeping up with the cost of living—no wonder young people are organizing.

Are you a young adult confused about your economic future? You’re not alone. The president brags of surging markets and job growth, but you’re getting rejected for every job you apply for, scrambling to pay rent, and stuck in a dead-end retail job. Maybe it’s time to take inspiration from the latest stats about millennials: Workers age 35 and under are the main component of an unprecedented surge in union membership over the past two years.

Nationwide in 2017, nearly 860,000 workers under age 35 got hired, and nearly a quarter of those were union jobs. According to an analysis by the Economic Policy Institute, “Historically, younger workers have been less likely than older workers to be a member of union,” so in that sense there’s a lot of room to grow among younger workers, whose union membership lags behind other age groups. Millennials are responsible for a huge portion of the recent gains in union representation across the workforce, which has managed to remain fairly steady (yep, young people are keeping labor alive). Growing by some 198,000 workers, youth in union jobs are offsetting loss of union jobs in older age brackets; union jobs for workers age 45 to 54 dropped by some 75,000 over the same period.

So, in contrast to the myth of millennials’ being economically and politically adrift, they’re stepping in readily to fill the union ranks that have hemorrhaged middle-aged workers over the years—2017 actually saw an increase in the overall number of unionized workers over the previous year. A movement that we’re used to thinking of as getting older and smaller is actually growing stronger and younger—and they may well be leading the next progressive voting bloc in tandem with the labor movement.

In addition to breaking with an overall long-term decline in unionization across the workforce (now 10.7 percent), the youth surge highlights another dimension to the simultaneous rise in “gig economy” jobs. A recent analysis of job growth since 2005 reveals massive growth in temporary, irregular, or subcontracted work, known for unstable pay and precarious working conditions. And yet there hasn’t been a correlating backslide necessarily in younger workers’ labor power. There are actually signs that youth are increasingly driven to join unions precisely in response to economic precarity and eroding economic mobility. Even youth-oriented sectors have seen high-profile union victories, from digital-newsroom unions at Vice and Fusion to graduate-faculty unions at many public and increasingly, private, university campuses.


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Re: Labor Union Growth

#17

Post by DejaMoo » Tue Feb 06, 2018 3:33 pm

New Data: Michigan Unions Added 52,000 Members in 2017
Percent of union members in Michigan workforce increased to 15.6 percent
http://miaflcio.org/2018/01/new-data-mi ... bers-2017/


Minnesota gained 46,000 union members last year, reversing decade-long decline
https://advocate.stpaulunions.org/2018/ ... bor-update



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Re: Labor Union Growth

#18

Post by Addie » Fri Feb 09, 2018 12:37 pm

Mother Jones
The Economic Outlook for Millennials is Bleak. Now They’re Unionizing in Record Numbers.

Add one more thing to the list of retro things young Americans are rediscovering: Unions. According to the Economic Policy Institute, a liberal think tank, 76 percent of new union members in 2017 were under 35. That’s pretty significant, considering that workers 34 and under make up just 40 percent of the country’s total workforce. In short, young workers may be kicking off a trend that could strengthen a labor movement that’s been brought to its knees by decades of attacks from employers, corporations, and hostile lawmakers.



These numbers represent a significant break with recent history. Younger workers have always been less likely than older ones to be unionized. This is still the case—roughly 8 percent of workers under 34 are union members, compared with around 13 percent of workers 35 and older. Yet nearly one in four new jobs among younger workers in 2017 was a union job. Recent polling suggests that today’s young workers increasingly identify with organized labor. Last year, Pew Research found that 75 percent of 18- to 29-year-olds (including 55 percent of young Republicans) have favorable views of unions—a rate far higher than that of any other age group.

John Schmitt, the vice president of EPI, points to the difficult economic landscape facing young people and a growing sense of powerlessness as one obvious reason why unions are getting a bump. “It is possible that the imagination of young people has been sparked,” he says. More of them may be receptive to “the idea of being in a union in order to counterbalance the power of the people that they work for.”

While it’s difficult to know which sectors are driving the growth in younger union membership, Schmitt points to the industries that are experiencing the most overall growth in unionization, including the public sector, construction, information, and education.


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