Communications Workers Organizing

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Addie
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Communications Workers Organizing

#1

Post by Addie » Sun Mar 18, 2018 8:57 am

Charleston Gazette-Mail
WV judge grants restraining order against striking Frontier employees

A judge has granted Frontier Communications a temporary restraining order against striking workers in West Virginia and Ashburn, Virginia, preventing those workers “from engaging in certain unlawful violence, property damage and mass picketing” the company says has occurred during the ongoing strike.

But the roughly 1,400 striking members of Communications Workers of America Local 142 are maintaining that Frontier’s claims of unlawful activity are an overreaction to fair picketing methods the union has been practicing since the strike began March 4, adding that Frontier is unwilling to provide 100 percent job security for union workers. ...

In a statement Friday, Mooney said the court “has given the parties until Monday evening to come to an agreement on the parameters of that activity during this strike, and we will work to ensure that our members’ rights are protected.”

“The company’s action comes in the face of the tremendous support that residents and business owners across West Virginia have shown for the strike, and shows that the company is worried because that support has spread to Connecticut, where Frontier workers have set up informational pickets at work locations and at Frontier’s headquarters,” Mooney said. ...

Job security remains key for the striking workers, who say the company has been cutting middle-class jobs and replacing those employees with contractors unfit to service Frontier’s West Virginia network. They attribute a recent hike in Frontier service complaints filed with the West Virginia Public Service Commission to this practice.

The union wants 100 percent of employees to have protection against layoffs in the next contract, while Frontier is staying with its offer of 85 percent. Eighty-five percent job security would leave roughly 200 employees at risk of being laid off, with those potential cuts being concentrated in Ashland, Virginia, and in Bluefield and Wheeling, union members said Friday at a picket line near Frontier’s Charleston office.


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Re: Communications Workers Organizing

#2

Post by Addie » Wed Apr 11, 2018 10:31 am

HuffPo
In Wyoming, A Newly Unionized Newsroom Says Corporate Bosses Are Retaliating

The labor union representing workers at the Casper Star-Tribune in Wyoming has accused the paper and parent company Lee Enterprises of retaliating against pro-union employees to chill organizing efforts in Lee’s other newsrooms.

The Communications Workers of America filed charges with the National Labor Relations Board on Monday. The union says the company engaged in unfair labor practices when it laid off features editor Elise Schmelzer and suspended politics reporter Arno Rosenfeld.

“I think it was a retaliatory tactic ― toward us and toward Elise specifically,” said a source in the Star-Tribune newsroom who requested anonymity out of fear of retaliation. “It’s fair to say they’re going to war with us.”

The charges claim that Schmelzer ― a manager who was not a member of the union ― was let go “due to her support for the recently certified union,” and that “other pro-union, non-bargaining unit employees were also terminated.” ...

Multiple staffers took the dismissal and suspension as a threat. On Thursday, the Star-Tribune bargaining unit, which calls itself the Casper News Guild, released a statement calling the decision to dismiss Schmelzer “appalling and short-sighted.”

“While Lee Enterprises officials may believe that taking punitive action against non-union members at the Star-Tribune will discourage employees across the company’s many newspapers from organizing, their apparently capricious actions in Casper serve only to highlight the need for staff to stand up for their rights,” the statement said.


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Re: Communications Workers Organizing

#3

Post by Addie » Wed Apr 11, 2018 10:32 am

Dupe


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Re: Communications Workers Organizing

#4

Post by realist » Wed Apr 11, 2018 11:03 am

The union wants 100 percent of employees to have protection against layoffs in the next contract.
:roll:

And a pony, I presume.


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Re: Communications Workers Organizing

#5

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Wed Apr 11, 2018 12:31 pm

realist wrote:
Wed Apr 11, 2018 11:03 am
The union wants 100 percent of employees to have protection against layoffs in the next contract.
:roll:

And a pony, I presume.
If you don't ask.....


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Re: Communications Workers Organizing

#6

Post by DejaMoo » Wed Apr 11, 2018 12:42 pm

realist wrote:
Wed Apr 11, 2018 11:03 am
The union wants 100 percent of employees to have protection against layoffs in the next contract.
:roll:

And a pony, I presume.
It's an understandable demand, given the circumstances. Those being: Frontier needs to keep staffing at the same or higher levels, but they're getting rid of their own employees and hiring contractors to do the work. Union-busting, in other words. That move is also in accordance with Frontier's reputation for having absolutely no interest in providing acceptable levels of service to their users.

Up here, other telecoms have been off-loading their rural phone lines/customers to Frontier, whose business model is to do nothing and let the lines/service deteriorate, even to the point of becoming unusable. Losing customers is cheaper than investing in infrastructure, and since most of their infrastructure is copper, they figure it's just a matter of time anyway. The rural communities in the area my brother lives in actually considered suing Frontier for refusing to maintain their infrastructure even when it meant their emergency services providers couldn't be contacted/couldn't use the landlines for their work. As for my brother, after Frontier refused point-blank to replace the damaged copper line to his house, he ended up paying a cable provider in the area just over five thousand bucks to run service to his property. He was, lucky for him, outside the limits of the other cable company that had the contract for town, because their service sucked, too. But five Gs and a monthly phone/internet bill on top of that made for a very expensive FU to Frontier.



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Re: Communications Workers Organizing

#7

Post by Addie » Wed May 02, 2018 11:07 am

NJ.com
N.J. state workers say yes to new contract, raises after years of fighting Christie

State workers have ratified a new contract with Gov. Phil Murphy's administration that will award them two, 2-percent raises and retroactive bonuses for longevity that the Christie administration had withheld, their union announced Tuesday.

The union, the Communications Workers of America, framed the contract as a major win for the 32,000 workers who have been working without since July 2015.

This agreement will date back to that summer and expire in June 2019. Labor leaders have said negotiations on the next agreement are already under way. ...

Under the deal, employees will receive two pay bumps, a 2 percent raise retroactive to last August and a 2 percent raise effective this July.

It will also bring to an end a years-long dispute between the union and the state over so-called increments, or step increases, the pay bumps employees receive when they reach certain longevity milestones.

Workers had been frozen on the state's pay grid since 2015, when the last contract expired. The CWA, and others, stalled negotiations while it awaited a state Supreme Court ruling on funding for government worker pensions it said would set the tone for those talks.


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Re: Communications Workers Organizing

#8

Post by Bill_G » Wed May 02, 2018 11:45 am

DejaMoo wrote:
Wed Apr 11, 2018 12:42 pm
realist wrote:
Wed Apr 11, 2018 11:03 am
The union wants 100 percent of employees to have protection against layoffs in the next contract.
:roll:

And a pony, I presume.
It's an understandable demand, given the circumstances. Those being: Frontier needs to keep staffing at the same or higher levels, but they're getting rid of their own employees and hiring contractors to do the work. Union-busting, in other words. That move is also in accordance with Frontier's reputation for having absolutely no interest in providing acceptable levels of service to their users.

Up here, other telecoms have been off-loading their rural phone lines/customers to Frontier, whose business model is to do nothing and let the lines/service deteriorate, even to the point of becoming unusable. Losing customers is cheaper than investing in infrastructure, and since most of their infrastructure is copper, they figure it's just a matter of time anyway. The rural communities in the area my brother lives in actually considered suing Frontier for refusing to maintain their infrastructure even when it meant their emergency services providers couldn't be contacted/couldn't use the landlines for their work. As for my brother, after Frontier refused point-blank to replace the damaged copper line to his house, he ended up paying a cable provider in the area just over five thousand bucks to run service to his property. He was, lucky for him, outside the limits of the other cable company that had the contract for town, because their service sucked, too. But five Gs and a monthly phone/internet bill on top of that made for a very expensive FU to Frontier.
Buried communication service can be as little as $30/mi if using direct burial rated cable, and as much as >$1M/mi if also trenching in power within conduit. And that's assuming there is a utility ROW.



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Re: Communications Workers Organizing

#9

Post by Addie » Mon Sep 03, 2018 4:57 pm

Dissent
Brooklyn Wireless Workers Vote to Save Their Union

Verizon keeps trying to stop wireless workers from organizing. Instead their union is expanding. ...



But their fight didn’t stop with the conclusion of the six-and-a-half-week strike nor the ratification of their first union contract. In late April 2016 a decertification petition was filed, which threatened the continued existence of the union. The vote was delayed for nearly two years as an unfair labor practice complaint worked its way through the National Labor Relations Board process, but on August 23 workers voted to keep the union. The result is an important victory for the Brooklyn workers and the union, which has used its success in the borough as a bulwark from which to branch out to organize more wireless workers, even beyond Verizon. It is, as CWA District 1 organizing director Tim Dubnau put it, a ripple from the storm that was 2016, but a ripple that has the potential to spread quite far.

Warthen-Sypher and Monique Rochelle, another Brooklyn wireless worker, felt the significance of the strike from its beginning. “It was something that we understood would go nationwide and we just went with it. We knew this was the first of many things we would be able to accomplish with the union,” Warthen-Sypher said. Rochelle, whose parents worked for Verizon on the landline side and were members of the union while she was growing up, said that the support and solidarity of the landline workers—many of whom had been through prior strikes—made her feel “to this day that it’s a family. We all have each other’s backs.”

The 2016 strike was a pivot point for CWA’s efforts to organize Verizon Wireless retail stores, allowing the union to build off the improbable momentum of having organized every wireless store in Brooklyn. But it also catalyzed the decertification, which was filed during the strike. “It was like the Empire striking back,” Dubnau said.

To Warthen-Sypher, it seems that the company has never stopped fighting their union. “It slowed down a bit once the union was voted in, but it was always in the back of their minds.” Over four years, she watched Verizon roll out anti-union tactics that CWA had warned them about. “Watching that playbook unfold before our eyes, it basically confirmed why we needed the union there for us.”

With the decertification hanging over the workers’ heads, they were constantly afraid that their four-year struggle would be wiped away, said Colin Hull, a ten-year Verizon employee who recently received a settlement for his termination from the company. His initial interest in the union was piqued by his frustration with the company, particularly the way that promotions were given out. As he became more involved he talked to family members who were in unions, and began to read more about labor history. What he learned helped inspire him to fight. Hull was on the union’s bargaining team for the first contract negotiation, and was disheartened by the company’s refusal to bargain over their proposals, only to then turn around and implement those same proposals later.


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