Imported Workers

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Volkonski
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Re: Imported Workers

#26

Post by Volkonski » Fri Feb 09, 2018 1:55 pm

If Immigrants Are Pushed Out, Who Will Care for the Elderly?

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/02/heal ... ivers.html
In Brooklyn, Mary DiGangi, the human resources director at the Menorah Center for Rehabilitation and Nursing Care, recently asked local employment agencies to find 20 to 25 new nursing assistants and practical nurses.

It’s a typical request, and usually, she said, “I’m flooded with applications the next day.” This time, she saw only five applications over a month.

She thinks the Trump administration’s immigration policies and rhetoric have discouraged potential workers. Menorah, part of MJHS Health System, draws heavily on immigrants for its 3,500 employees.

Among them are 25 Haitian-American nursing assistants and practical nurses whose temporary protected status was terminated in November. They will have to leave by July 2019, unless the Secretary of Homeland Security changes her mind. Other Menorah staffers brought to this country as children, now DACA recipients, also remain in limbo
.

Nationally 1 in 4 direct care workers are immigrants. In states like New York, California and Florida, 40% of elder care workers are immigrants.


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Volkonski
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Re: Imported Workers

#27

Post by Volkonski » Tue Feb 13, 2018 11:50 am



Kay Steiger‏
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Trump wants to aggressively cut legal immigration, but this is what happened at three of his own properties. https://www.vox.com/2018/2/13/16466542/ ... st-workers
143 foreign guest workers, 1 US worker.


Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
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Addie
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Re: Imported Workers

#28

Post by Addie » Sat Mar 03, 2018 3:15 pm

Bloomberg
California Fruit Will ‘Die on the Vine’ After ICE Raids, Labor Warns ...

Their absence threatens segments of the largest state economy, including retailers, restaurants and the Central Valley’s $47 billion agricultural industry, which provides more than half of the fruits, nuts and vegetables in the country. That broad, 450-mile swath of California yields an eighth of the country’s agricultural output.

The farm industry is already struggling to find workers like Maria’s husband. More than 55 percent of 762 farmers and ranchers surveyed in a California Farm Bureau Federation report from October 2017 said half of their land continues to go unattended because of an ongoing labor shortage directly related to U.S. immigration policy.

Of the state’s more than 2 million farm laborers, 1.5 million are undocumented, according to Tom Nassif, President of the Western Growers Association, a 92-year-old industry group representing farmers in California, Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico. Although Nassif and the association have supported Trump since the early days of his campaign, he says the raids and decades-old immigration policy for farm workers are harming the industry and state economy. ...

Congress is currently mulling a proposal to amend its seasonal workers’ visa program by capping the number it issues every year at 410,000. The legislation would attempt to force all undocumented workers to return to their native countries and apply for visas. Only a fraction of those who apply would be allowed to return.

In effect, that would would be a prohibition on undocumented labor that would paralyze California’s agriculture industry, said Nassif, which is already losing acres of labor-intensive crops, including cherries, apples, peppers and berries to farms in Mexico, South and Central America and East Asia. After setting records for revenue every year in the six years to 2015, receipts fell 13 percent to $47 billion in 2016 because of “the ongoing drought and shifting market conditions,” according to Karen Ross, Secretary of California’s Department of Food and Agriculture.

The most significant “market condition” is the labor shortage, said Arturo Rodriguez, president of the United Farm Workers of America union, a problem that will get worse as long as Trump’s ICE continues to target California.


¡Sterngard! come home.

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Volkonski
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Re: Imported Workers

#29

Post by Volkonski » Sat Mar 03, 2018 3:52 pm

Addie wrote:
Sat Mar 03, 2018 3:15 pm
Bloomberg
California Fruit Will ‘Die on the Vine’ After ICE Raids, Labor Warns ...

Their absence threatens segments of the largest state economy, including retailers, restaurants and the Central Valley’s $47 billion agricultural industry, which provides more than half of the fruits, nuts and vegetables in the country. That broad, 450-mile swath of California yields an eighth of the country’s agricultural output.

The farm industry is already struggling to find workers like Maria’s husband. More than 55 percent of 762 farmers and ranchers surveyed in a California Farm Bureau Federation report from October 2017 said half of their land continues to go unattended because of an ongoing labor shortage directly related to U.S. immigration policy.

:snippity:

The most significant “market condition” is the labor shortage, said Arturo Rodriguez, president of the United Farm Workers of America union, a problem that will get worse as long as Trump’s ICE continues to target California.
This was a problem for farms on the North Fork last year and it certainly won't get better this year. Also last year my lawn service was unable to provide a full 3 person mowing crew for most of the summer and we had to wait weeks to get bed and tree work done. This country depends on immigrants for seasonal labor.


Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

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RTH10260
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Re: Imported Workers

#30

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Mar 04, 2018 8:45 am

Addie wrote:
Sat Mar 03, 2018 3:15 pm
Bloomberg
California Fruit Will ‘Die on the Vine’ After ICE Raids, Labor Warns ...

:snippity:

The most significant “market condition” is the labor shortage, said Arturo Rodriguez, president of the United Farm Workers of America union, a problem that will get worse as long as Trump’s ICE continues to target California.
It's all cause Democrats, Obama, and not forget that :brickwallsmall: they want to keep their sanctuary cities...



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TollandRCR
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Re: Imported Workers

#31

Post by TollandRCR » Sun Mar 04, 2018 10:56 am

Is it time to start a new bracero program? The WWII program guaranteed a minimum wage, sanitary living conditions including housing, showers, and sewage, health care of a minimalist sort, food, and legal immigration status. It prohibited strikes by the Mexican laborers, but strikes occurred anyway.

Some employers abused bracero workers, while others employed illegal migrants because they were cheaper and did not receive bracero living conditions. After the war when citizen laborers were again available unions attacked the bracero program as depressing wages and removing jobs from the normal labor market.

It is not clear that Mexicans would flock to a new bracero program. NAFTA and ordinary economic growth have expanded the Mexican middle class, and even agricultural laborers have benefited from wage growth and improved state welfare programs. We might need to draw our bracero workers from Central America and the Caribbean. We might also have to devise a 365-day program as opposed to the old harvest seasons bracero program. It might also have to go beyond agricultural workers.

Would this take jobs from citizens? Surely it would if employers were willing to pay citizen wages for the jobs that a new bracero program would fill. The fact that some employers cannot find employees for their jobs is a hint that citizens would not be displaced. In addition we have no idea about jobs that might be created if bracero workers were available (there is much work to be done in most urban low-income areas, including repair of housing and clean-up). They might even be helpful in new housing construction if the negative impacts on citizen workers could be eliminated. Low-income housing is an enormous need, especially for our large homeless urban population.


“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

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