Robot Replacement of Human Workers

NMgirl
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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#51

Post by NMgirl » Fri Mar 31, 2017 10:32 am

More than four million jobs will likely be lost with a rapid transition to autonomous vehicles. Driving occupations, including delivery and heavy truck drivers, bus drivers, and taxi and chauffeur drivers, would be heaviest hit. Driving occupations represent a significant source of work for those with lower levels of educational attainment, with the vast majority (93.2 percent) of workers in these jobs possessing less than a bachelor’s degree. Workers in driving occupations have a poverty rate (7.32 percent) lower than the overall workforce (8.06 percent) and non-driving occupations alone (8.08 percent), which suggests that driving jobs are by and large “good jobs” that keep workers in driving occupations out of poverty.
http://globalpolicysolutions.org/report ... e-of-work/


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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#52

Post by Skip Intro » Fri Mar 31, 2017 4:48 pm

Now they want to kill us.
After several minutes, Elsea grabbed a tool—on the video it looks like a screwdriver—and entered the screened-off area around the robot to clear the fault herself. Whatever she did to Robot 23, it surged back to life, crushing Elsea against a steel dashboard frame and impaling her upper body with a pair of welding tips. A co-worker hit the line’s emergency shut-off. Elsea was trapped in the machine—hunched over, eyes open, conscious but speechless.

No one knew how to make the robot release her. The team leader jumped on a forklift and raced across the factory floor to the break room, where he grabbed a maintenance man and drove him back on his lap. The technician, from a different part of the plant, had no idea what to do. Tempers erupted as Elsea’s co-workers shoved the frightened man, who was Korean and barely spoke English, toward the robot, demanding he make it retract. He fought them off and ran away, Meadows says. When emergency crews arrived several minutes later, Elsea was still stuck. The rescue workers finally did what Elsea had failed to do: locked out the machine’s emergency power switch so it couldn’t reenergize again—a basic precaution that all factory workers are supposed to take before troubleshooting any industrial robot. Ajin, according to OSHA, had never given the workers their own safety locks and training on how to use them, as required by federal law. Ajin is contesting that finding.
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features ... shed-limbs


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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#53

Post by Volkonski » Fri Mar 31, 2017 5:11 pm

Skip Intro wrote:Now they want to kill us.
After several minutes, Elsea grabbed a tool—on the video it looks like a screwdriver—and entered the screened-off area around the robot to clear the fault herself. Whatever she did to Robot 23, it surged back to life, crushing Elsea against a steel dashboard frame and impaling her upper body with a pair of welding tips. A co-worker hit the line’s emergency shut-off. Elsea was trapped in the machine—hunched over, eyes open, conscious but speechless.

No one knew how to make the robot release her. The team leader jumped on a forklift and raced across the factory floor to the break room, where he grabbed a maintenance man and drove him back on his lap. The technician, from a different part of the plant, had no idea what to do. Tempers erupted as Elsea’s co-workers shoved the frightened man, who was Korean and barely spoke English, toward the robot, demanding he make it retract. He fought them off and ran away, Meadows says. When emergency crews arrived several minutes later, Elsea was still stuck. The rescue workers finally did what Elsea had failed to do: locked out the machine’s emergency power switch so it couldn’t reenergize again—a basic precaution that all factory workers are supposed to take before troubleshooting any industrial robot. Ajin, according to OSHA, had never given the workers their own safety locks and training on how to use them, as required by federal law. Ajin is contesting that finding.
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features ... shed-limbs
:madguy:

Based on my 35 years in the process and aerospace industries-

1- It should have been impossible for a human to enter that screened off area without engineering controls automatically de-energizing the robot's power supply in such a way that only a supervisor could re-energize the system and that only after inspection and the creation of signed paperwork confirmed that the equipment area was secure.

2- A worker should not have been able to enter the screened off area without first getting a signed work permit and access permit from a line supervisor who would check that the equipment was de-energized and locked out using the worker's lock to which only that worker had the key. Only once those signed permits were posted at the work site would the local area steward unlock the screened off area to give access to the worker.

3- Elsea should have had thorough safety training on which she was tested before starting the job with refresher classes at least annually. The required passing grade on the test should be 100%.


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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#54

Post by RoadScholar » Fri Mar 31, 2017 9:50 pm

Yikes. We have safer procedures than that plant does for emptying the dust collectors. :brickwallsmall:


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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#55

Post by Slartibartfast » Fri Mar 31, 2017 10:50 pm

RoadScholar wrote:Yikes. We have safer procedures than that plant does for emptying the dust collectors. :brickwallsmall:
Um... That doesn't seem like a particularly strong statement given the possibility of a sawdust explosion.

Not that that means having an employee impaled is okay, of course.


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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#56

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Jun 25, 2017 3:10 pm

H/T to LL at

The delivery robot

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q64XhvXabeQ

Similar on these links:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGDNejAQo6Q

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fj9NG7g0PSA

also similar:
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The hotel drink butler:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zF-M5ZNZ40I



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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#57

Post by Volkonski » Mon Oct 16, 2017 12:16 pm

This is a long interesting article about the state of robots in the workplace. It covers many aspects of this. I will quote 4 paragraphs but there is much more of interest.

Welcoming Our New Robot Overlords

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017 ... picks=true
In the Steelcase metal factory, automation has led the company to seek out more highly educated managers, who are now expected to have a college degree, not just a high-school diploma. The company, following the “lean manufacturing” model pioneered by Toyota, hires young engineers to scan factory data for additional “efficiencies,” which can translate into further automation. For people who have technical degrees and can manage automated systems, and for owners of companies that are in the process of automating, the potential for increased wealth is significant. But for less skilled workers it’s a different story. In a paper from earlier this year, the economists Daron Acemoglu, of M.I.T., and Pascual Restrepo, of Boston University, studied local job markets in the United States between 1990 and 2007, and they found that the concentration of industrial robots in an area was directly related to a decline in jobs and in pay. Technology can compound the effects of globalization. By one measure, the average manufacturing worker in the United States earned nine per cent less in 2015 than the average worker in 1973, while the economy over all grew by two hundred per cent. At Steelcase, Stinson acknowledged, workers were earning around the same dollar salary that they had in 1987.
Automation does reduce the overall need for human workers.
Simply automating a legacy warehouse, however, is a halfway measure, as a visit to Symbotic makes clear. A privately held company based in an industrial park outside Boston, it sells fully automated warehouse systems to large retail chains, and the new warehouses resemble the old ones about as much as a Tesla resembles a Model T. The company’s twenty-thousand-square-foot test center is a giant cube of interlocking green, yellow, and white steel shelving, tracks, and cages that extend from the floor almost to the ceiling. There are no aisles for lifts to pass through, and no stations for human product pickers. There is no space inside the matrix for people at all.
That type of warehouse operates 24/7, uses 35% less energy partly because very little lighting is needed and reduces labor costs by up to 80%.
Wong sat with his back to a wall of dozens of screens, which depicted various production metrics and live video of the manufacturing floor, where workers—and an increasing number of robots—were fabricating circuit boards. (I was there on a trip with a nonprofit called the China-U.S. Exchange Foundation.) He quickly demonstrated the lack of sentimentality with which many businesspeople in China approach the subject of automation. C.I.G. is trying to replace as many human workers with robots as possible, he explained. Three or so years ago, the company had thirty-five hundred people at work in the factory. Two years ago, it was twenty-five hundred. Today, it is eighteen hundred. Over the same period, he said proudly, the company’s output had doubled.
Workers in China are losing jobs to robots. :shock: Even with China's relatively inexpensive labor they saved money when automation reduced the workforce from 3500 to 1800 (almost in half) while doubling product output.
Tellex has been conducting her own research into the causes of income inequality and, with her friends, has amassed a reading list of academic studies and news articles. She is drawn to the idea of a universal basic income, in which citizens would receive enough money from the government to cover living expenses. Ultimately, she knows, blue-collar workers are not the only ones who may need such economic assistance. The disruption spurred by automation is not anticipated to be limited to low-skilled work; significant encroachments are expected in the white-collar sector as well, with experts predicting that professionals such as accountants, doctors, lawyers, architects, teachers, and journalists will all compete with increasingly capable computers in the future.
Expect more disruption, not less, from automation.


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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#58

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Oct 16, 2017 6:57 pm

Volkonski wrote:
Mon Oct 16, 2017 12:16 pm
This is a long interesting article about the state of robots in the workplace. It covers many aspects of this. I will quote 4 paragraphs but there is much more of interest.

Welcoming Our New Robot Overlords

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017 ... picks=true
:snippity:
Thanks, long article, not yet finished :)



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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#59

Post by Volkonski » Wed Oct 18, 2017 11:59 am

The Long-Term Jobs Killer Is Not China. It’s Automation.

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/21/upsh ... pe=article
Take the steel industry. It lost 400,000 people, 75 percent of its work force, between 1962 and 2005. But its shipments did not decline, according to a study published in the American Economic Review last year. The reason was a new technology called the minimill. Its effect remained strong even after controlling for management practices; job losses in the Midwest; international trade; and unionization rates, found the authors of the study, Allan Collard-Wexler of Duke and Jan De Loecker of Princeton.


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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#60

Post by neeneko » Wed Oct 18, 2017 12:17 pm

Volkonski wrote:
Mon Oct 16, 2017 12:16 pm
Expect more disruption, not less, from automation.
As someone who is currently job hunting, I am increasingly seeing the writing on the wall even for high tech workers. Every time I go hunting in my field I see a smaller number of higher paying positions, and a lot of those are working with technologies that reduce or eliminate the need for other departments AND require fewer people to do it in the dept that is sticking around.

Working high tech has become an increasingly unsure domain, with greater rewards going to a shrinking pool which on paper is presented as 'shortages with high pay', but the reality is looking increasingly grim.



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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#61

Post by Chilidog » Wed Oct 18, 2017 12:19 pm

Can we replace Trump with a Robot?

How about with Pence?



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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#62

Post by DejaMoo » Wed Oct 18, 2017 12:39 pm

This is why I keep shaking my head when the Republicans in my state continue to insist there's a skilled worker shortage in manufacturing, and want to encourage kids to go into manufacturing jobs as a career. Sure, there might be a 'shortage' of skilled machinists or die makers right now. But that shortage can be remedied now by offering higher wages and providing on the job training. As for the future - it has no people in it. Those jobs will be done by robots.

The Republicans know this. They're just pandering to the small-town rural base that is nostalgic for decent-paying local jobs that don't require a college degree or years of training.



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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#63

Post by Addie » Thu Nov 23, 2017 2:19 pm

WaPo: The fourth industrial revolution is upon us
LA Times: The driverless revolution may exact a political price


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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#64

Post by Addie » Wed Nov 29, 2017 10:39 am

Axios
McKinsey: automation may wipe out 1/3 of America’s workforce by 2030

In a new study that is optimistic about automation yet stark in its appraisal of the challenge ahead, McKinsey says massive government intervention will be required to hold societies together against the ravages of labor disruption over the next 13 years. Up to 800 million people—including a third of the work force in the U.S. and Germany—will be made jobless by 2030, the study says.

The bottom line: The economy of most countries will eventually replace the lost jobs, the study says, but many of the unemployed will need considerable help to shift to new work, and salaries could continue to flatline. "It's a Marshall Plan size of task," Michael Chui, lead author of the McKinsey report, tells Axios.
Keep reading ... words

In the eight-month study, the McKinsey Global Institute, the firm's think tank, found that almost half of those thrown out of work—375 million people, comprising 14% of the global work force—will have to find entirely new occupations, since their old one will either no longer exist or need far fewer workers. Chinese will have the highest such absolute numbers—100 million people changing occupations, or 12% of the country's 2030 work force.

I asked Chui what surprised him the most of the findings. "The degree of transition that needs to happen over time is a real eye opener," he said.


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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#65

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Nov 29, 2017 3:18 pm

Addie wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 10:39 am
Axios
McKinsey: automation may wipe out 1/3 of America’s workforce by 2030
:snippity:
Where will Teh Donald find all those coal mines to offer work for the MAGA-Americans ? :twisted:



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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#66

Post by RTH10260 » Sat Jan 27, 2018 9:20 pm




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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#67

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Sat Jan 27, 2018 9:27 pm

Yabbut can they cluck sympathetically when you tell them your tale of woe?

(And remember the bartender in Passengers. He had a big mouth.)



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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#68

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Feb 05, 2018 9:06 pm

The Easiest Way to Organise Your Shoes – Self-Parking Slippers

These self-parking slippers are the perfect solution to organizing your shoe collection. Although slow moving, the motorized shoes feature a bottom wheel, enabling them to move, arrange and store themselves neatly



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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#69

Post by Volkonski » Sun Mar 04, 2018 10:34 am

Will 2018 be the year of the neo-luddite?

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/ ... ssion=true
This reformed luddism does not however mean the end of good, old-fashioned machine-smashing. The original luddites did not dislike machines per se, rather what they were doing to their livelihoods and way of life. It’s hard not to see the anti-Uber protests in a similar light. Over the past couple of years, there have been something approaching anti-Uber riots in Paris; in Hyderabad, India, drivers took to the streets to vent their rage against unmet promises of lucrative salaries; angry taxi drivers blocked roads last year across Croatia, Hungary and Poland. In Colombia, there were clashes with police, while two Uber vehicles were torched in Johannesburg and 30 metered taxi drivers arrested.

Imagine what might happen when driverless cars turn up. The chancellor has recently bet on them, promising investment and encouraging real road testing; he wants autonomous vehicles on our streets by 2021. The industry will create lots of new and very well-paid jobs, especially in robotics, machine learning and engineering. For people with the right qualifications, that’s great. And for the existing lorry and taxi drivers? There will still be some jobs, since even Google tech won’t be able to handle Swindon’s magic roundabout for a while. But we will need far fewer of them. A handful might retrain, and claw their way up to the winner’s table. I am told repeatedly in the tech startup bubble that unemployed truckers in their 50s should retrain as web developers and machine-learning specialists, which is a convenient self-delusion. Far more likely is that, as the tech-savvy do better than ever, many truckers or taxi drivers without the necessary skills will drift off to more precarious, piecemeal, low-paid work.

Does anyone seriously think that drivers will passively let this happen, consoled that their great-grandchildren may be richer and less likely to die in a car crash? And what about when Donald Trump’s promised jobs don’t rematerialise, because of automation rather than offshoring and immigration? Given the endless articles outlining how “robots are coming for your jobs”, it would be extremely odd if people didn’t blame the robots, and take it out on them, too.

Once people start believing that machines are a force of oppression rather than liberation, there will be no stopping it. Between 1978 and 1995, the Unabomber, Ted Kaczynski, sent 16 bombs to targets including universities and airlines, killing three people and injuring 23. Kaczynski, a Harvard maths prodigy who began to live off-grid in his 20s, was motivated by a belief that technological change was destroying human civilisation, ushering in a period of dehumanised tyranny and control. Once you get past Kaczynski’s casual racism and calls for violent revolution, his writings on digital technology now seem uncomfortably prescient. He predicted super-intelligent machines dictating society, the psychological ill-effects of tech-reliance and the prospect of obscene inequality as an elite of techno-savvies run the world.


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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#70

Post by gupwalla » Sun Mar 04, 2018 11:57 am

One of the more important issues we will deal with in the next quarter-century will be how to integrate increased automation and AI into our societies so that we reap the maximum benefits from the sum of human and machine.

It is the next step of human evolution, and the journey must be taken with the greatest of care. But to resist automation and AI is to scoff at the notion that we should descend from the trees and walk upright.

PS: This isn't just a feature of the manufacturing world. It's hitting white-collar jobs as well. How many law firms still hire teams of newly-minted lawyers to scour dusty texts in the law library? What is the cost-per-knowledge of taking a well-designed MOOC course versus pursuing a formal degree at a university? And a handful of news articles in the last few weeks have mentioned "software robots" in the context of business automation.


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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#71

Post by TollandRCR » Sun Mar 04, 2018 12:23 pm

Brick and mortar colleges do not just offer lecture courses. We encourage students to talk and even to argue. We encourage them to join in social activities and to develop their athletic skills. We encourage them to learn how to treat the opposite sex. Most learning on a campus does not occur in a classroom. Of course, this does not always work, vide the Unabomber.


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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#72

Post by gupwalla » Sun Mar 04, 2018 12:47 pm

TollandRCR wrote:
Sun Mar 04, 2018 12:23 pm
Brick and mortar colleges do not just offer lecture courses. We encourage students to talk and even to argue. We encourage them to join in social activities and to develop their athletic skills. We encourage them to learn how to treat the opposite sex. Most learning on a campus does not occur in a classroom. Of course, this does not always work, vide the Unabomber.
I don't disagree with you. I cherish my college experience, including what my university called "The Other Education" - everything you learn that doesn't show up on a test.

But in terms of raw skills development, online courses are faster, cheaper, and more effective. For those who do not have the resources or motivation for a formal degree, MOOCs and other online learning platforms provide a valuable fast-track to marketable knowledge and skills. In terms of cost-per-knowledge, the online platforms win. (I'm not even sure I could put a dollar value on the cost-per-experience of attending university, though, which is what I take to be your point.)

Over the coming decade, VR will synthesize traditional and new-tech education methods. The future is not about choosing one or the other. It's about combining the tools into something greater than its parts.


In a wilderness of mirrors, what will the spider do beyond the circuit of the shuddering Bear in fractured atoms? -TS Eliot (somewhat modified)

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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#73

Post by TollandRCR » Sun Mar 04, 2018 6:07 pm

I agree Gupwalla. I fear that students educated solely in online courses will sometimes lack essential social skills and the broad knowledge to be wise citizens.


“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#74

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Mar 19, 2018 6:12 pm

Self-driving Uber kills Arizona woman in first fatal crash involving pedestrian
Tempe police said car was in autonomous mode at the time of the crash and that the vehicle hit a woman who later died at a hospital

Sam Levin and Julia Carrie Wong in San Francisco
Mon 19 Mar 2018 20.54 GMT First published on Mon 19 Mar 2018 17.10 GMT

An autonomous Uber car killed a woman in the street in Arizona, police said, in what appears to be the first reported fatal crash involving a self-driving vehicle and a pedestrian in the US.

Tempe police said the self-driving car was in autonomous mode at the time of the crash and that the vehicle hit a woman, who was walking outside of the crosswalk and later died at a hospital. There was a vehicle operator inside the car at the time of the crash.

Uber said in a statement on Twitter: “Our hearts go out to the victim’s family. We are fully cooperating with local authorities in their investigation of this incident.” A spokesman declined to comment further on the crash.

The company said it was pausing its self-driving car operations in Phoenix, Pittsburgh, San Francisco and Toronto. Dara Khosrowshahi, Uber’s CEO, tweeted: “Some incredibly sad news out of Arizona. We’re thinking of the victim’s family as we work with local law enforcement to understand what happened.”

Uber has been testing its self-driving cars in numerous states and temporarily suspended its vehicles in Arizona last year after a crash involving one of its vehicles, a Volvo SUV. When the company first began testing its self-driving cars in California in 2016, the vehicles were caught running red lights, leading to a high-profile dispute between state regulators and the San Francisco-based corporation.


https://www.theguardian.com/technology/ ... zona-tempe



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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#75

Post by Volkonski » Tue Apr 03, 2018 3:43 pm



Guardian news

@guardiannews


Workers at risk as robots set to replace 66m jobs, warns OECD
https://
ebx.sh/2GuuBDT

2:38 PM - Apr 3, 2018
That's 66 million jobs just in the 32 OECD countries.
The report said some of its member states were far more vulnerable than others to seeing jobs replaced by computers or algorithms: “There are significant differences across countries: 33% of all jobs in Slovakia are highly automatable, while this is only the case with 6% of the jobs in Norway.


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