Robot Replacement of Human Workers

NMgirl
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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

Post #51 by NMgirl » Fri Mar 31, 2017 10:32 am

More than four million jobs will likely be lost with a rapid transition to autonomous vehicles. Driving occupations, including delivery and heavy truck drivers, bus drivers, and taxi and chauffeur drivers, would be heaviest hit. Driving occupations represent a significant source of work for those with lower levels of educational attainment, with the vast majority (93.2 percent) of workers in these jobs possessing less than a bachelor’s degree. Workers in driving occupations have a poverty rate (7.32 percent) lower than the overall workforce (8.06 percent) and non-driving occupations alone (8.08 percent), which suggests that driving jobs are by and large “good jobs” that keep workers in driving occupations out of poverty.

http://globalpolicysolutions.org/report ... e-of-work/



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Skip Intro
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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

Post #52 by Skip Intro » Fri Mar 31, 2017 4:48 pm

Now they want to kill us.

After several minutes, Elsea grabbed a tool—on the video it looks like a screwdriver—and entered the screened-off area around the robot to clear the fault herself. Whatever she did to Robot 23, it surged back to life, crushing Elsea against a steel dashboard frame and impaling her upper body with a pair of welding tips. A co-worker hit the line’s emergency shut-off. Elsea was trapped in the machine—hunched over, eyes open, conscious but speechless.

No one knew how to make the robot release her. The team leader jumped on a forklift and raced across the factory floor to the break room, where he grabbed a maintenance man and drove him back on his lap. The technician, from a different part of the plant, had no idea what to do. Tempers erupted as Elsea’s co-workers shoved the frightened man, who was Korean and barely spoke English, toward the robot, demanding he make it retract. He fought them off and ran away, Meadows says. When emergency crews arrived several minutes later, Elsea was still stuck. The rescue workers finally did what Elsea had failed to do: locked out the machine’s emergency power switch so it couldn’t reenergize again—a basic precaution that all factory workers are supposed to take before troubleshooting any industrial robot. Ajin, according to OSHA, had never given the workers their own safety locks and training on how to use them, as required by federal law. Ajin is contesting that finding.


https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features ... shed-limbs


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Volkonski
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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

Post #53 by Volkonski » Fri Mar 31, 2017 5:11 pm

Skip Intro wrote:Now they want to kill us.

After several minutes, Elsea grabbed a tool—on the video it looks like a screwdriver—and entered the screened-off area around the robot to clear the fault herself. Whatever she did to Robot 23, it surged back to life, crushing Elsea against a steel dashboard frame and impaling her upper body with a pair of welding tips. A co-worker hit the line’s emergency shut-off. Elsea was trapped in the machine—hunched over, eyes open, conscious but speechless.

No one knew how to make the robot release her. The team leader jumped on a forklift and raced across the factory floor to the break room, where he grabbed a maintenance man and drove him back on his lap. The technician, from a different part of the plant, had no idea what to do. Tempers erupted as Elsea’s co-workers shoved the frightened man, who was Korean and barely spoke English, toward the robot, demanding he make it retract. He fought them off and ran away, Meadows says. When emergency crews arrived several minutes later, Elsea was still stuck. The rescue workers finally did what Elsea had failed to do: locked out the machine’s emergency power switch so it couldn’t reenergize again—a basic precaution that all factory workers are supposed to take before troubleshooting any industrial robot. Ajin, according to OSHA, had never given the workers their own safety locks and training on how to use them, as required by federal law. Ajin is contesting that finding.


https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features ... shed-limbs


:madguy:

Based on my 35 years in the process and aerospace industries-

1- It should have been impossible for a human to enter that screened off area without engineering controls automatically de-energizing the robot's power supply in such a way that only a supervisor could re-energize the system and that only after inspection and the creation of signed paperwork confirmed that the equipment area was secure.

2- A worker should not have been able to enter the screened off area without first getting a signed work permit and access permit from a line supervisor who would check that the equipment was de-energized and locked out using the worker's lock to which only that worker had the key. Only once those signed permits were posted at the work site would the local area steward unlock the screened off area to give access to the worker.

3- Elsea should have had thorough safety training on which she was tested before starting the job with refresher classes at least annually. The required passing grade on the test should be 100%.


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― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

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RoadScholar
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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

Post #54 by RoadScholar » Fri Mar 31, 2017 9:50 pm

Yikes. We have safer procedures than that plant does for emptying the dust collectors. :brickwallsmall:


The bitterest truth is healthier than the sweetest lie.

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Slartibartfast
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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

Post #55 by Slartibartfast » Fri Mar 31, 2017 10:50 pm

RoadScholar wrote:Yikes. We have safer procedures than that plant does for emptying the dust collectors. :brickwallsmall:


Um... That doesn't seem like a particularly strong statement given the possibility of a sawdust explosion.

Not that that means having an employee impaled is okay, of course.


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nam-myoho-renge-kyo---Thomas Jefferson (quoting Slartibartfast)



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