Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

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AndyinPA
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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#426

Post by AndyinPA »

I’m 5’ 2”. My mother was at least 5’ 8” while I was growing up. By the time she died at 94, I was looking down at her. :(

I have a cousin six weeks older than I. We were always the same height; she might have been 1/2 inch or so taller. She came to my brother-in-law’s funeral and I found myself looking down at her, and I’ve seen her in the last year. :o
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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#427

Post by Sunrise »

More than spinal compression is at fault in my case. I also have spinal stenosis which led to scoliosis about 10 years ago. Before that, I was 5’12” (I’m female and that sounded better to me than 6’) and now measure at 5’6” to 5’7” depending on how much I’m bent over at any given time. My friends tease me that they still look up to me, only not in the literal sense any more. ;)
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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#428

Post by pipistrelle »

On the flip side, depending on who's doing the measurement, I've been known to grow an inch between doctor's visits. :-D

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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#429

Post by John Thomas8 »

58 years old, the cold is really starting to affect my knees. But after the tale of my father getting his replaced I'm not convinced it's the way to go.

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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#430

Post by Whatever4 »

John Thomas8 wrote:
Thu Dec 12, 2019 10:37 pm
58 years old, the cold is really starting to affect my knees. But after the tale of my father getting his replaced I'm not convinced it's the way to go.
I love my new knees!
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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#431

Post by Foggy »

My dad waited until he was 83 to get his knees replaced. He couldn't really do the rehab and now he can barely stand up.

I got my knee replaced when I was 63, and it's better than the other one now.
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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#432

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

Hubby has lost about 2 inches. Now both of our sons and hubby are the same height. Ironically both sons have tall significant others.
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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#433

Post by Bill_G »

Oddly, the height goes into the girth. Lose inches on the inseam, gain them in the waist. Weird.

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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#434

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

Bill_G wrote:
Fri Dec 13, 2019 8:26 am
Oddly, the height goes into the girth. Lose inches on the inseam, gain them in the waist. Weird.
:eek2:
A 19th Amendment Centennial Moment:
The 19th Amendment was first introduced to Congress in 1878, yet it was not approved by Congress until 1919 – 41 years later.
- https://legaldictionary.net/19th-amendment/

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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#435

Post by Bill_G »

Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Fri Dec 13, 2019 8:27 am
Bill_G wrote:
Fri Dec 13, 2019 8:26 am
Oddly, the height goes into the girth. Lose inches on the inseam, gain them in the waist. Weird.
:eek2:
I know. Totally unexpected.

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MN-Skeptic
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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

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Post by MN-Skeptic »

An interesting article in the New York Times:

Frail Older Patients Struggle After Even Minor Operations
Dr. Hall’s research, recently published in JAMA Surgery, has found that frail, older adults are more likely than other patients to die after even supposedly minor procedures — and even when the surgery goes well, without complications.

Frail, older patients frequently undergo such operations, which surgeons tend to see as routine, simple fixes — but may not be. “Our data indicate that there are no low-risk procedures among patients who are frail,” Dr. Hall and his co-authors concluded in their study.

What’s frailty? “It’s an accumulation of problems that leave the patient vulnerable to stressors,” said Dr. Ronnie Rosenthal, a surgeon at the Yale School of Medicine. “And surgery is a big stress.”

Even in healthy patients, surgery “demands a lot of reserve from your body,” she added. But when they become frail, “people already use whatever reserve they have just to maintain their daily lives.”

After operations, frail patients find it harder than others to regain strength and mobility, and to return to independent lives.
More at the link.

I've read other articles talking about the fact that even for healthy, exercising older folks surgery can affect them much more drastically and can require a much longer recovery time than for a young person.
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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#437

Post by Addie »

Cross-posting

Associated Press
Senate OKs big changes to how Americans save for retirement ...

The Secure Act — which stands for Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement — is designed to help more people set aside more money for retirement. It does so primarily by removing some of the hurdles that keep people from saving.

Among its highlights is a provision that would make it easier for small businesses to band together to offer retirement plans to their employees. It also opens the door for long-term part-time employees to gain access to workplace retirement plans.

In addition, it raises the age that Americans must start drawing from retirement savings, known as the required minimum distribution age, from 70½ to 72, as people are living and working longer. It also provides more years for people to contribute to individual retirement accounts, for the same reason.

It creates new rules that could expand lifetime-income options within workplace plans, such as annuities. That’s aimed at helping people establish reliable streams of income in retirement. It would also make it easier for employees to transfer retirement plan assets when they change jobs.

It also fixes a component of the 2017 tax overhaul that raised taxes on benefits received by family members of deceased military veterans, as well as taxes on some students and members of Native American tribes.

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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#438

Post by Addie »

Quartz
How to survive the coming retirement crisis ...

Chile has a defined contribution (DC) system where individuals contribute to an account and bear the investment risk of financing their retirement. The French government offers a generous defined benefit (DB) plan, where the state pays its citizens a set income each year. Both systems are falling short, because no matter how you finance retirement you can’t escape one fundamental truth; retirement is expensive and there is not enough money for it. Or, at least, there is not enough money to finance the length of retirement at the standard of living people have come to expect. As Baby Boomers retire, they are putting every type of system to the test, and we are all going to have to revise our expectations.
How bad is it?

The retirement shortfall has become more noticeable not only because a large population is starting to retire, but because Baby Boomers are the first generation to retire with individual accounts: the 401(k)-like plans in the US, UK, and Australia, among others. Economists at the left-leaning Economic Policy Institute declared the 401(k) system a disaster, citing 50% coverage rates and low asset balances that won’t cover an adequate retirement.

But to a large extent retirees aren’t worse off compared to earlier generations, and in some cases may be better prepared. The post-war era is often considered a retirement heyday in America, where Social Security was well funded and people got a generous pension from their employer. But, in fact, at the peak only 38% of workers got a DB pension from their employer, so most people relied on Social Security. Now, more than half of workers have access to some form of a retirement plan. Better coverage is why the median retirement savings balance for workers in the US doubled between 1989 and 2016, increasing from $9,300 to about $20,000, adjusted for inflation.

Individual retirement accounts make the shortfalls that always existed with DB plans more transparent. The World Economic Forum defines a successful retirement as ending work in your mid 60s with 70% of your salary for the rest of your life. If that’s the goal, any shortfall reflects the retirement we want, not the one we ever had. Retirement is a relatively modern concept that only went mainstream after WWII. People now live longer and in better health, anticipating spending up to one third of their life retired.

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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#439

Post by AndyinPA »

Hubby is having heart surgery on January 16. They have been following him for ten years. Aortic stenosis has to hit a certain level before they will operate. He went downhill very fast, which both surgeons said was common. He has dreaded open-heart surgery for all of that ten years. For about the last six years they have been doing a procedure, TAVR, similar to heart catherization. He had to go through a lot of testing to be sure he would qualify, and he does. We spent most of Tuesday meeting the team and the two surgeons, the one who will do the TAVR and the “cutter,” who, of course, recommended open-heart surgery. But we had done our homework, so we are sticking with TAVR. He might get to go home from the hospital the same day. I made reservations to stay at The Family House so that we can easily get to the hospital early in the morning. My daughter also lives close to the hospital.

It’s pretty amazing what they can do. I remember when my brother had open-heart surgery at a younger age and what a rough surgery that was. They mostly do the TAVR on older patients since they don’t have long-term results, but the results so far are good and the further out they go, the better they are expecting. Despite the cutter’s opinions, the hospital has built him and the surgeon who will be doing the procedure a unit at one of the hospitals in the University of Pittsburgh’s Medical School system, which also says they expect this to be a better procedure with better results in the future. Both surgeons are co-directors of the unit.
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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#440

Post by Addie »

All good fortune to both of you, Andy :bighug:

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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#441

Post by RVInit »

Andy, :bighug:
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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

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Love to you and your fambly. :grouphug:
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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#443

Post by Foggy »

Good luck to you and your hubby, Andy! :bighug: :bighug: :bighug: :bighug: :bighug:
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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#444

Post by p0rtia »

Our paths never seem to cross, but I love your posts, and will be thinking of you and yours in the coming days. :bighug:
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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

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Post by Volkonski »

Best wishes for a good outcome. :bighug:
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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#446

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

Good luck, Andy! Heart procedures are amazing! My hubby had an aortic valve replacement and quadruple bypass in 2018. His recovery was up and down but he was able to return to work within 8 weeks. He is now back to training for Senior Olympic swimming!
A 19th Amendment Centennial Moment:
The 19th Amendment was first introduced to Congress in 1878, yet it was not approved by Congress until 1919 – 41 years later.
- https://legaldictionary.net/19th-amendment/

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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#447

Post by Sunrise »

Sending lots of wishes for a successful surgery and speedy recovery. :bighug:
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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

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Stanford University School of Medicine
'Ageotypes' provide window into how individuals age, study reports ...

"We know already there are a handful of nice molecular and clinical markers, such as high cholesterol, that are more common in older populations," said Michael Snyder, Ph.D., professor and chair of genetics. "But we want to know more about aging than what can be learned from population averages. What happens to an individual as they age? No one has ever looked at the same person in detail over time."

Now, Snyder and his team have done just that: They profiled a group of 43 healthy men and women between the ages of 34 and 68, taking extensive measurements of their molecular biology at least five times over two years.

The researchers determined that people generally age along certain biological pathways in the body: metabolic, immune, hepatic (liver) and nephrotic (kidney). People who are metabolic agers, for example, might be at a higher risk for diabetes or show signs of elevated hemoglobin A1c, a measure of blood-sugar levels, as they grow older. People with an immune ageotype, on the other hand, might generate higher levels of inflammatory markers or be more prone to immune-related diseases as they age. But the ageotypes are not mutually exclusive, and a metabolic ager could also be an immune ager, for example.

Using blood, stool and other biological samples, the study tracked levels of certain microbes and biological molecules, such as proteins, metabolites and lipids, in participants over two years, monitoring how the levels changed over time.

"Our study captures a much more comprehensive view of how we age by studying a broad range of molecules and taking multiple samples across years from each participant," Snyder said. "We're able to see clear patterns of how individuals experience aging on a molecular level, and there's quite a bit of difference." Differences not only in the ways one ages, but the rates at which one ages. Perhaps the most important thing, he said, is that the study's measurements were taken during an actionable timeframe—two years—making it possible for someone to counteract increased markers of aging by changing their behavior.

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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#449

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

https://time.com/5765493/indiana-state- ... tires-102/

'Your Body Tells You When It's Time to Go.' Indiana State Employee Finally Retiring at 102


Bob Vollmer plans to report to work for the last time Feb. 6 as a surveyor for the Indiana Department of Natural Resources. The southern Indiana man, whose mother lived to be 108, joined the state agency in 1962.

The World War II veteran still travels Indiana collecting technical field data and confirming boundary lines for DNR-managed properties, but he said that his body finally is telling him it’s time to retire.

After the war, Vollmer graduated from Purdue University with a degree in biological and agricultural engineering in 1952. He then worked for the Wabash Valley Association on reservoir and flood control projects before coming to work for the DNR.

During his DNR career, the tools of the surveying trade evolved from paper and pencil to high-tech gear such as a handheld GPS device.

A 19th Amendment Centennial Moment:
The 19th Amendment was first introduced to Congress in 1878, yet it was not approved by Congress until 1919 – 41 years later.
- https://legaldictionary.net/19th-amendment/

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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#450

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-01- ... s-age.html

'Ageotypes' provide window into how individuals age, study reports


We know already there are a handful of nice molecular and clinical markers, such as high cholesterol, that are more common in older populations," said Michael Snyder, Ph.D., professor and chair of genetics. "But we want to know more about aging than what can be learned from population averages. What happens to an individual as they age? No one has ever looked at the same person in detail over time."

Now, Snyder and his team have done just that: They profiled a group of 43 healthy men and women between the ages of 34 and 68, taking extensive measurements of their molecular biology at least five times over two years.

The researchers determined that people generally age along certain biological pathways in the body: metabolic, immune, hepatic (liver) and nephrotic (kidney). People who are metabolic agers, for example, might be at a higher risk for diabetes or show signs of elevated hemoglobin A1c, a measure of blood-sugar levels, as they grow older. People with an immune ageotype, on the other hand, might generate higher levels of inflammatory markers or be more prone to immune-related diseases as they age. But the ageotypes are not mutually exclusive, and a metabolic ager could also be an immune ager, for example.

Perhaps most exciting—and surprising—is that not everyone in the study showed an increase in ageotype markers over time. In some people, their markers decreased, at least for a short period, when they changed their behavior. They were not Benjamin Buttons—that is, they still aged—but the overall rate at which they did so declined, and in some cases aging markers decreased. In fact, the team saw this phenomenon occur in a handful of important clinical molecules, including hemoglobin A1c and creatine, a marker for kidney function, among a small subset of participants.
A 19th Amendment Centennial Moment:
The 19th Amendment was first introduced to Congress in 1878, yet it was not approved by Congress until 1919 – 41 years later.
- https://legaldictionary.net/19th-amendment/

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