Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

User avatar
Tiredretiredlawyer
Posts: 7601
Joined: Tue May 10, 2016 2:56 pm
Location: Animal Planet
Occupation: Permanent probationary slave to 2 dogs, 1 cat, and 1 horse

Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#1

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Fri Aug 04, 2017 1:16 pm

http://www.openculture.com/2017/08/10-l ... xpert.html

This guy is a youngster compared to :sterngard: but he has good advice.
10 Longevity Tips from Dr. Shigeaki Hinohara, Japan’s 105-Year-Old Longevity Expert

1. Eat to Live Don’t Live to Eat

2. Keep on Truckin’…"

3. Mother Was Wrong...

...at least when it comes to bedtime and the importance of consuming three square meals a day. Disco naps and bottled water all around!

4. To Hell with Obscurity!

Share what you know. I give 150 lectures a year, some for 100 elementary-school children, others for 4,500 business people. I usually speak for 60 to 90 minutes, standing, to stay strong.

5. Don’t Slack on Everyday Physical Activity
Dr. Hinohara schlepped his own bags and turned his back on such modern conveniences as elevators and escalators:

I take two stairs at a time, to get my muscles moving.

6. Having Fun Is Better Than Tylenol (Or Bitching About It)

7. Think Twice Before You Go Under the Knife

8. Divest of Material Burdens

9. Pick a Role Model You Can Be Worthy Of

10. Find a Poem That Speaks to You and Let It Guide You


"The people must know before they can act, and there is no educator to compare with the press." - Ida B. Wells-Barnett, journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist, feminist and founder with others of NAACP.

User avatar
tek
Posts: 2730
Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2012 6:02 pm
Location: Happy Valley, MA
Occupation: Damned if I know

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#2

Post by tek » Fri Aug 04, 2017 6:07 pm

[bbvideo=560,315][/bbvideo]


A truckload of bricks
In the soft morning light

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 28630
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#3

Post by Addie » Tue Jan 30, 2018 11:33 am

The Atlantic: The Startling Link Between Sugar and Alzheimer's


¡Sterngard! come home.

User avatar
kate520
Posts: 15220
Joined: Mon Oct 26, 2009 3:02 pm
Location: Dark side of the Moon
Occupation: servant of cats, chicken wrangler
Contact:

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#4

Post by kate520 » Tue Jan 30, 2018 1:39 pm

Love his advice, TRL. I can think of a few things my mother said that fit:
- You’ve made your bed, now lie in it. Made me terrified, for many years, of commitment and decisions. What if I’m wrong? I have to live with it for the rest of my life?!
- Act your age!! I never listened to that one. :lol:
- Never marry a writer. :blink:


DEFEND DEMOCRACY

User avatar
Tiredretiredlawyer
Posts: 7601
Joined: Tue May 10, 2016 2:56 pm
Location: Animal Planet
Occupation: Permanent probationary slave to 2 dogs, 1 cat, and 1 horse

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#5

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Tue Jan 30, 2018 1:42 pm

kate520 wrote:
Tue Jan 30, 2018 1:39 pm
Love his advice, TRL. I can think of a few things my mother said that fit:
- You’ve made your bed, now lie in it. Made me terrified, for many years, of commitment and decisions. What if I’m wrong? I have to live with it for the rest of my life?!
- Act your age!! I never listened to that one. :lol:
- Never marry a writer. :blink:
:thumbs: Act your age confused me- my mental age, my chronological age or my inner rebel's age.


"The people must know before they can act, and there is no educator to compare with the press." - Ida B. Wells-Barnett, journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist, feminist and founder with others of NAACP.

User avatar
Foggy
Posts: 27163
Joined: Tue Jan 20, 2009 12:00 pm
Location: Fogbow HQ
Occupation: Dick Tater

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#6

Post by Foggy » Tue Jan 30, 2018 4:49 pm

One good thing about turning 65 - free membership in a fitness center.


Mr. William L. Bryan is the root of a great deal of criminal mischief.
And yet, Mr. Bryan remains at large. :mrgreen:

User avatar
Tiredretiredlawyer
Posts: 7601
Joined: Tue May 10, 2016 2:56 pm
Location: Animal Planet
Occupation: Permanent probationary slave to 2 dogs, 1 cat, and 1 horse

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#7

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Tue Jan 30, 2018 6:55 pm

Foggy wrote:
Tue Jan 30, 2018 4:49 pm
One good thing about turning 65 - free membership in a fitness center.
Yep!


"The people must know before they can act, and there is no educator to compare with the press." - Ida B. Wells-Barnett, journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist, feminist and founder with others of NAACP.

User avatar
Judge Roy Bean
Posts: 381
Joined: Mon Aug 15, 2016 12:26 pm
Location: West of the Pecos
Occupation: Isn't it obvious?

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#8

Post by Judge Roy Bean » Wed Jan 31, 2018 12:06 am

Things you have to come to grips with and some tips I've collected over the years from personal experience and trusted friends:

That really neat but really now way-too-heavy articulated ladder is going to bang into things when you have to maneuver to use it just to change a light bulb or change a smoke detector battery. Admit defeat, get a cheap, lightweight step ladder and sell the heavy one.

See above - and one - never use a ladder when no one is in the house with you and two - always wear shoes.

If you have hardwood or tile floors get and wear those no-slip socks with the sticky buttons on them.

Never get on or stay on a boat without a life jacket, no matter how many other people shun them. Believe me, you're not the swimmer you used to be. Be insistent, even at the risk of being rude when it comes to your grandchildren having them on.

Don't try to rely on your memory when it comes to meds. Get one of those day-of-the-week plastic boxes and/or a reminder app for your smart phone. If your spouse asks again and again, accept it as appropriate concern not simple nagging. Do the the same in return.

Never bathe or shower when no one else is in the house. If you're living alone set a fixed routine time and make sure someone knows and can check on you.

That really wonderful cast-iron skillet is heavy and dangerous when it's full of hot frying oil. Slide it, don't lift it until it cools off.

With this kind of flu situation, take advantage of those wipe things at the grocery stores - don't touch the cart until you've wiped your hands and the the cart handles and surfaces.

Changing a tire is way too hazardous in any number of ways. Get a roadside service arrangement. Some of them are free with phone services or tire purchases and many car loans include them. You have time to wait for them to come, believe me and it doesn't have to be on the side of the road - they'll come to your house.

Technology is your friend. Never go anywhere without your phone close at hand, even in your own home, especially if you don't have one of those alert pendant systems.

Some car remote devices can activate a car alarm system to start honking the horn. If you have one, keep it by your bed at night to ward off possible intruders and attract the attention of neighbors if need be.

Never go to bed without a well-charged phone.

Tell family or friends if you're going somewhere. A simple text is invaluable if something happens to you and you need to be found.

It ain't for fraidy cats but sharing and common sense can make it safer.


“Where all think alike, no one thinks very much.”
Walter Lippmann

User avatar
RVInit
Posts: 7450
Joined: Sat Mar 05, 2016 4:31 pm

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#9

Post by RVInit » Wed Jan 31, 2018 12:10 am

Judge Roy Bean wrote:
Wed Jan 31, 2018 12:06 am
Things you have to come to grips with and some tips I've collected over the years from personal experience and trusted friends:

That really neat but really now way-too-heavy articulated ladder is going to bang into things when you have to maneuver to use it just to change a light bulb or change a smoke detector battery. Admit defeat, get a cheap, lightweight step ladder and sell the heavy one.

See above - and one - never use a ladder when no one is in the house with you and two - always wear shoes.

If you have hardwood or tile floors get and wear those no-slip socks with the sticky buttons on them.

Never get on or stay on a boat without a life jacket, no matter how many other people shun them. Believe me, you're not the swimmer you used to be. Be insistent, even at the risk of being rude when it comes to your grandchildren having them on.

Don't try to rely on your memory when it comes to meds. Get one of those day-of-the-week plastic boxes and/or a reminder app for your smart phone. If your spouse asks again and again, accept it as appropriate concern not simple nagging. Do the the same in return.

Never bathe or shower when no one else is in the house. If you're living alone set a fixed routine time and make sure someone knows and can check on you.

That really wonderful cast-iron skillet is heavy and dangerous when it's full of hot frying oil. Slide it, don't lift it until it cools off.

With this kind of flu situation, take advantage of those wipe things at the grocery stores - don't touch the cart until you've wiped your hands and the the cart handles and surfaces.

Changing a tire is way too hazardous in any number of ways. Get a roadside service arrangement. Some of them are free with phone services or tire purchases and many car loans include them. You have time to wait for them to come, believe me and it doesn't have to be on the side of the road - they'll come to your house.

Technology is your friend. Never go anywhere without your phone close at hand, even in your own home, especially if you don't have one of those alert pendant systems.

Some car remote devices can activate a car alarm system to start honking the horn. If you have one, keep it by your bed at night to ward off possible intruders and attract the attention of neighbors if need be.

Never go to bed without a well-charged phone.

Tell family or friends if you're going somewhere. A simple text is invaluable if something happens to you and you need to be found.

It ain't for fraidy cats but sharing and common sense can make it safer.
:thumbs:


"I know that human being and fish can coexist peacefully"
--- George W Bush

ImageImage

User avatar
June bug
Posts: 6099
Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2009 3:29 pm
Location: Northern San Diego County

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#10

Post by June bug » Wed Jan 31, 2018 3:41 pm

RVInit wrote:
Wed Jan 31, 2018 12:10 am
Judge Roy Bean wrote:
Wed Jan 31, 2018 12:06 am
Things you have to come to grips with and some tips I've collected over the years from personal experience and trusted friends:

:snippity:

It ain't for fraidy cats but sharing and common sense can make it safer.
:thumbs:
:thumbs: Me too. Thanks, JRB!



User avatar
Judge Roy Bean
Posts: 381
Joined: Mon Aug 15, 2016 12:26 pm
Location: West of the Pecos
Occupation: Isn't it obvious?

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#11

Post by Judge Roy Bean » Mon Feb 05, 2018 10:42 pm

You're welcome and one that has slapped me upside the head in the last couple of weeks ... I have children with families and grandchildren. I was a military OR tech and later, over the years made good friends in part-time civilian stints in OR's with physicians. Years ago at home I enforced a rule and I shared with my kids over and over - DON'T SHARE TOOTHPASTE.

Sure enough this year - child number two has suddenly realized she's spent hours and hours cleaning and disinfecting everything in the house to no avail. Guess what - they're all using one of those pump-dispenser things and smearing their toothbrushes against it.

:brickwallsmall: :crying:


“Where all think alike, no one thinks very much.”
Walter Lippmann

User avatar
June bug
Posts: 6099
Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2009 3:29 pm
Location: Northern San Diego County

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#12

Post by June bug » Tue Feb 06, 2018 1:27 pm

Sorry, JRB.

I have a grosser story though. One of our cats loves to lick the plastic cover on my electric toothbrush (only mine, not my hub's!). I disinfect both cap and brush every time before I use it, but still... :sick:



User avatar
kate520
Posts: 15220
Joined: Mon Oct 26, 2009 3:02 pm
Location: Dark side of the Moon
Occupation: servant of cats, chicken wrangler
Contact:

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#13

Post by kate520 » Tue Feb 06, 2018 3:36 pm

About a year ago I started finding the sink stopper from the main bathroom either on the floor in front of the sink or just outside the door. One night I awoke to my smoke tuxie, Sabbath, standing on my chest holding the stopper in his teeth, dripping grossness on my face. He stopped that shortly after, but now he steals my toothbrush periodically . Just mine, never hub’s. The first one I haven’t found (yet); the second one I found buried in the cat box :sick: . I keep a Costco pack of new ones in the cabinet now. :mrgreen:

The thing about aging that I dislike the most is not being ABLE to do what I used to with ease, not because I lack strength or know-how, but because my body is betraying me. :evil: For example, I’m still CAPABLE of lifting 75 lbs but if I do I know my back will be strained. But my hands...I can barely open jars anymore, it hurts so bad and all the strength has left my right hand. My advice for what those who have what might be gamer’s thumb or arthritis, my doc can’t tell, is to invest in good jar and can openers.

The hardest one for me to remember is to stop bitching about all the indignities. This is the order of things and there are certain compensations that come with age. When I do remember, I “get out of the problem and into the solution”* and spend some time looking for them.


* The best General Life Advice I ever received. Don’t waste time bemoaning your fate. Once you identify the problem, start looking for the solution instead of dwelling on it.


DEFEND DEMOCRACY

User avatar
TollandRCR
Posts: 20731
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 11:17 pm

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#14

Post by TollandRCR » Sat Mar 24, 2018 4:09 pm

I plan to go back to my current stomping grounds on Sunday, although my house is not yet habitable. Later I will probably migrate to a warmer clime.

I wish it were the case that every “senior living center” were as satisfactory as this one. Nice physical facility. Competent, caring staff. Most important to me, usually good food. Tonight Caesar salad (no anchovies 😐). Shrimp scampi with pasta dressed by good house made tomato sauce. Chocolate cake with vanilla ice cream. A drop of a passable wine.

While I was in this fine facility, elderly people suffered in bad nursing homes; some died unnecessarily. People who once had lively minds began to lose that capability because of an absence of stimulation, not physical change nor volition. Creativity vanished where it had no range to roam.

We are a bit behind Japan in the proportion of our total population that is 75 and older. We are not prepared to cope with their needs. Warehousing them in “senior housing” will be below our standards for how to treat people. Most of the elderly do not have the financial resources to come to a place like this, much less to spend years in such a place. Some of them will live to 100 or more; few of any elderly population will have financial resources to cover this.

We need to work on this.

We do not want the future portrayed by one alternative fiction novelist. The young people in his novel correctly see those not much older than them as occupying all the jobs. The very olds are sustained in a vegetative life in sophisticated life maintenance machines in solidly protected buildings, although they are not aware of anything. Youth try to go to war with the people who have taken all that the society has to offer. The capable aged have no scruples in destroying the next generation. Medical and public health have created a heavy burden on the society. Albert Brooks, 2030: The real story of what happens to America.

We must avoid going there. We must also avoid discarding the elderly once we think they are worn out. The Norman Rockwell multi-generational families are probably gone and will not return. What will we construct in their stead?


“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

User avatar
Volkonski
Posts: 18937
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#15

Post by Volkonski » Sun Mar 25, 2018 10:21 am

Americans With Alzheimer's Now Number 5.7 Million

https://www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue ... 24252f4b62
The estimated number of Americans with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias has risen to 5.7 million, from 5.5 million in 2017, according to a report released today by the Alzheimer’s Association.

That's an increase of roughly 3.6% and largely reflects the aging of the boomer generation.

By 2025, the 2018 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures report projects, 7.1 million Americans aged 65 and older will have Alzheimer’s, and by 2050, some 13.8 million.

:snippity:

Care for patients with all types of dementia costs $277 billion, two-thirds of it borne by taxpayers. That figure represents “hard costs,” said Fargo, including Medicare, Medicaid, out-of-pocket spending — mostly for costly nursing homes — and private insurance. Half of the people living in nursing homes have dementia.
This will be a challenging public health problem. Too bad some of our leaders are focused on border walls and trade wars. :madguy:


Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

User avatar
Tiredretiredlawyer
Posts: 7601
Joined: Tue May 10, 2016 2:56 pm
Location: Animal Planet
Occupation: Permanent probationary slave to 2 dogs, 1 cat, and 1 horse

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#16

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Fri Apr 20, 2018 9:22 am

I have been taking an Alzheimer course for the last 2 weeks. It is well produced and quite informative. Go to www.alzu.org. I got a digital silver medal for finishing 5 lessons!

Lifestyle is a biggie in delaying Alzheimer's if you are at risk.

Also, too, enrollment starts in June for "the largest-ever lifestyle study on preventing cognitive decline." - Parade Magazine The U.S. POINTER study needs 2500 symptom free participants who are at risk for Alzheimer's, ages 60-79. Wake Forest, North Carolina and Northern California are the first regions to participate. www.alz.org/us-pointer
Edit: Socialization is an important component in preventing/delaying Alzheimer symptoms, including online socialization. Thank you, Fogbow!!!!!


"The people must know before they can act, and there is no educator to compare with the press." - Ida B. Wells-Barnett, journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist, feminist and founder with others of NAACP.

User avatar
MRich
Posts: 750
Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2010 4:07 pm

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#17

Post by MRich » Sat Apr 21, 2018 6:52 pm

My dad is 87. His mother died at 91 from Alzheimer's; his older brother died at 77 from it (less than a year after diagnosis).

My dad is physically very healthy. He is outside all the time, taking care of the garden, the yard (double size, hedges), and whatever else needs done, so he's very active even though he is slowing down. And mentally, he's starting to get forgetful and absent minded, but he hasn't shown any signs of dementia.

But in the last few days, his mental state has me rattled. My mother's brother died a couple days ago, and maybe that has something to do with it. But when we were talking about going to the funeral, and I was telling them I would arrange for the hotel, he asked me if he should go to the bank and get traveler's checks. I said "what for?" - I was genuinely flabbergasted. He said "for the hotel." I told him we would use his credit card and he said "will a hotel take that?" I assured him that it would, that no one uses traveler's checks any more, and a hotel clerk probably wouldn't even know what one was. He seemed a little confused, but he dropped the matter.

Then last night I was with a friend and my mother called - she couldn't find my father, she'd looked all over the house and yard. She was really upset (rightly so), so I said I would be there in 5 minutes. As I neared the house, I saw my father walking along the road. I pulled over and rolled down the window and said "What the HELL are you doing?" and he said "I'm walking." He didn't act confused at all - he knew exactly where he was - he just wanted to take a walk. I told him to GET. IN. THE. CAR. He said he wanted to finish his walk, but I insisted and he got in the car, where I told him that Mom was going to kill him for worrying her. He wanted me to just drop him off at the driveway - I think he was figuring he would sneak back in the house - but I said I was going in with him, and he looked at my friend and said "you better come in too." He figured it would be safer with a non-family member there.

So, one incident of just weirdness, and another incident of thoughtlessness. If just one occurred, I would shrug it off, but ... well, I'm worried. In a couple days, we'll be heading to the funeral - 5 hours in the car (me driving), then 5 days of funeral stuff, visiting family, etc., and the drive back. I guess I'll be able to get a better idea of his mental state after that.

Just wanted to share this with someone, and it's helping me to vent a little.

Like the topic says - Aging is not for fraidy cats.



User avatar
maydijo
Posts: 2764
Joined: Fri Sep 02, 2016 10:23 pm
Location: where women glow and men plunder
Occupation: harassing marsupials

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#18

Post by maydijo » Sat Apr 21, 2018 9:53 pm

That's tough. Unless he hasn't travelled in 20 years, the travelling checks comment is worrisome. But it could just be stress. In my experience, once people reach a certain age (generally around 80ish) they don't like going away. They have their routines and the places where they feel comfortable and it can be very stressful to have to leave that, even if it's just for a day. (My experience is 12 years working with the aged in a community setting.)

Good luck. Dementia is at least as hard, if not harder, on the family than on the patient. I hope this isn't the journey you're facing now.



User avatar
Fortinbras
Posts: 2776
Joined: Sun Jan 18, 2015 10:08 am

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#19

Post by Fortinbras » Sun Apr 22, 2018 1:54 am

I am 70. I have traveled but I still feel at sea when I check into a hotel. I don't know what to ask for, what to insist on, what documentation they want from me. Over the decades the process has changed, and there's a difference between big hotels and small places (and I learned some of the procedure from old movies on TV). It's very possible that your dad has traveled - but instead of staying at a hotel, he's been put in a guest room in someone's home or else whoever he was visiting made all the hotel arrangements for him.

Alzheimer's might run in families - I don't know if its genetic or maybe growing up in the same town with the same pollution and the same sort of diet. It is also possible that age-related hearing/vision loss causes a person to miss crucial instructions or questions, leading to the sort of mistakes that are easily confused with dementia.

My own father showed serious signs of dementia when he was in his 80s (he died at 84). Things like getting up in the middle of the night and walking out (barefoot) thinking he was going to morning services, and thinking he had somehow still at his old college campus. It was more upsetting for me than for him. And yet some of his intellect remained until his last year - for example, he would provide his nurse with a running translation of a French film shown on TV.



User avatar
Tiredretiredlawyer
Posts: 7601
Joined: Tue May 10, 2016 2:56 pm
Location: Animal Planet
Occupation: Permanent probationary slave to 2 dogs, 1 cat, and 1 horse

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#20

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Sun Apr 22, 2018 10:36 am

MRich wrote:
Sat Apr 21, 2018 6:52 pm
My dad is 87. His mother died at 91 from Alzheimer's; his older brother died at 77 from it (less than a year after diagnosis).

Just wanted to share this with someone, and it's helping me to vent a little.

Like the topic says - Aging is not for fraidy cats.
My mom died at age 87. She had dementia, but was living alone until diagnosed with a heart condition causing her to faint. She remembered all of her kids' names until she died. She loved having her granddoggies visit her at the residential care home. So did the other residents.

You will probably get a lot of info on the trip just observing your dad. There are many informative websites about dementia and Alzheimer's. They should have info for you on how to be with your dad without him feeling as if he is under surveillance or you feeling like a hall monitor.

If he has Alzheimer's, he has had it for years, but may just now be having observable symptoms.

My best to you and your family. :bighug:


"The people must know before they can act, and there is no educator to compare with the press." - Ida B. Wells-Barnett, journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist, feminist and founder with others of NAACP.

User avatar
TollandRCR
Posts: 20731
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 11:17 pm

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#21

Post by TollandRCR » Sun Apr 22, 2018 11:43 am

i wonder whether our bodies and minds are good for as long as we now ask of them. It was not that long ago that 35 years was a good life and 50 was old. When Kaiser Wilhelm designed our Social Security system, 65 years was a safe choice -- few would collect for much longer.

Then in the 1950's we started extending the life span and sharply reducing some of the disabilities of old age. The former had a great deal to with penicillin and its ability to conquer (temporarily) our ancient enemies. The latter may have been primarily due to vaccines; those childhood diseases left lasting damage.

Are we now approaching our sell-by dates? I know some of us will make it into our 90's, and a few will become centenarians. (In the past consumption of yogurt seemed to be correlated.) I told recent classes that their cohort may be the first to have many reach 100.

Is this a good thing? We are occupying jobs into our 70's. That means that younger people do not get those jobs until late. We are incurring a significant fraction of our lifetime medical expenses in the last 3-4 years of life. That raises health care costs for everybody. Some of us will require " memory care." Social Security will need assessment in 25-30 years: is it still viable?

I can imagine a future in which medicine keeps us alive but unaware with advanced technology. There is a futuristic book by a humorist whose name I forget in which the elderly are warehouses on machines at great national expense. We do not like to think about "death panels," but they may be in our future. Or we need to rethink our expectations.

I was prompted to think of this by Barbara Bush's decision to have only comfort care at age 92. She was dying, but like my two first cousins she could probably have been kept alive for a while. To what point?


“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

User avatar
Volkonski
Posts: 18937
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#22

Post by Volkonski » Sun Apr 22, 2018 12:48 pm

Another factor lengthening human lifespans is that fewer people now perform hard physical labor that breaks down bodies.


Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

User avatar
TollandRCR
Posts: 20731
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 11:17 pm

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#23

Post by TollandRCR » Sun Apr 22, 2018 12:58 pm

Volkonski wrote:
Sun Apr 22, 2018 12:48 pm
Another factor lengthening human lifespans is that fewer people now perform hard physical labor that breaks down bodies.
And nutrition has improved for some of us in the US. (It has declined for others.)


“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

User avatar
MRich
Posts: 750
Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2010 4:07 pm

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#24

Post by MRich » Sun Apr 22, 2018 6:08 pm

On the day Glen Campbell died from Alzheimer's, coincidentally I went to a lecture by someone from our local Alzheimer's Association. They are seeing some great progress in clinical trials; it's really exciting.

I asked about their funding and was told they are totally funded by donations and grants - no government money. They 're now one of my charities.

Alzheimer's scares me to death; every time I have a "mind fart" I think "is this it?" It's a horrible way to go.



User avatar
Estiveo
Posts: 7423
Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2009 7:31 pm
Location: Trouble's Howse

Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#25

Post by Estiveo » Sun Apr 22, 2018 8:22 pm

MRich wrote:
Sun Apr 22, 2018 6:08 pm
Alzheimer's scares me to death; every time I have a "mind fart" I think "is this it?" It's a horrible way to go.
I do the same thing. After years as caregiver for Estiveo's Mom I find myself worrying when I can't remember a rarely used name. I've had a problem remembering names since grade school; it's not a new thing. Except for every time it happens now.


Image Image Image Image Image

Post Reply

Return to “Social Issues”