Water Troubles

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Addie
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Re: Water Troubles

#351

Post by Addie » Thu Mar 21, 2019 1:13 pm

USA Today: The waters are rising, the floods are coming. What are we doing to save ourselves?



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Re: Water Troubles

#352

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Mar 21, 2019 7:12 pm

Addie wrote:
Thu Mar 21, 2019 1:13 pm
USA Today: The waters are rising, the floods are coming. What are we doing to save ourselves?
Go with the change of times and build houseboats. Check out those Southern Asian countries who have been living that lifestyle for ages ;)



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Re: Water Troubles

#353

Post by Volkonski » Fri Mar 22, 2019 12:29 pm

The Midwest flooding has killed livestock, ruined harvests and has farmers worried for their future

https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/21/us/flood ... index.html
These are especially cruel times for Nebraska and Iowa farmers who had to scrape money to keep going just eight years ago, when floods overtook their lands in 2011.

"I would say 50% of the farmers in our area will not recover from this," Dustin Sheldon, a farmer in southwestern Iowa's flood-devastated Fremont County near the swollen Missouri River, said this week.

:snippity:

Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts called this the "most widespread disaster we have had in our state's history." Officials expect their initial farm damage estimates -- $400 million in damages to crops, and $400 million in lost livestock, will be exceeded, Nebraska Department of Agriculture spokeswoman Christin Kamm said.


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Re: Water Troubles

#354

Post by Lani » Fri Mar 22, 2019 1:59 pm

I heard NPR interviewing Nebraska farmers and ranchers about the flooding. One family had been on their land for 5 generations and lived in a house built pre-WWI that had never been flooded. The house and the land were underwater. Pretty much everything gone. There were similar stories from other farmers and ranchers - everything or nearly everything destroyed. The interviewees said "Nebraska Strong" and vowed to return, although one went on to say that he didn't know how his family could recover and sadly wondered whether there would be a 6th generation on the land.

I didn't hear a word about climate change.


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Re: Water Troubles

#355

Post by Volkonski » Sat Mar 23, 2019 11:40 am

The Fight to Tame a Swelling River With Dams That May Be Outmatched by Climate Change
Along the Missouri, John Remus controls a network of dams that dictates the fate of millions. ‘It was not designed to handle this.’


https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/21/clim ... &smtyp=cur
Should he try to hold back the surging Missouri River but risk destroying a major dam, potentially releasing a 45-foot wall of water? Or should he relieve the pressure by opening the spillway, purposely adding to the flooding of towns, homes and farmland for hundreds of miles.

:snippity:

And early last Thursday, the Niobrara River smashed through the nearly century-old Spencer Dam while pushing huge chunks of ice downriver. By the end of the day, the Niobrara and other tributaries had filled the reservoir behind the Gavins Point Dam, near Yankton, South Dakota, and Mr. Remus faced his decision.

:snippity:

To save Gavins Point, he ordered its spillways opened. At its peak, 100,000 cubic feet of water per second, the same as Niagara Falls, poured into a river already surging toward record heights.

:snippity:

Mr. Remus’s stewardship of the river is guided by a 432-page document, the Master Manual, which lays out the eight congressionally authorized purposes he must balance. They are flood control, river navigation, hydroelectric power, irrigation, water supply, water quality, recreation (such as fishing or boating), and the preservation of endangered species.


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Re: Water Troubles

#356

Post by Volkonski » Wed Mar 27, 2019 10:23 am



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Re: Water Troubles

#357

Post by DejaMoo » Wed Mar 27, 2019 10:34 am

Volkonski wrote:
Fri Mar 22, 2019 12:29 pm
The Midwest flooding has killed livestock, ruined harvests and has farmers worried for their future
"I would say 50% of the farmers in our area will not recover from this," Dustin Sheldon, a farmer in southwestern Iowa's flood-devastated Fremont County near the swollen Missouri River, said this week.
[/quote]

These are Red States, so they should treat this as a triumph of capitalism, in that their bankrupt farms will be acquired by larger corporate operations who will be able to run them more efficiently.

Economic Darwinism in action. To give them credit, Nebraska historically takes very little in the way of federal tax dollars, so a federal investment in rebuilding the levees would only be just. Besides, those future multinational corporate farm owners are going to need new, bigger, stronger levees to protect their property.


I've heard this bull before.

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Re: Water Troubles

#358

Post by Volkonski » Wed Mar 27, 2019 5:36 pm

CNN Breaking News

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Record flooding in the Midwest is threatening the safety of more than a million private water wells, the National Ground Water Association says https://cnn.it/2FvjTtC


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Re: Water Troubles

#359

Post by Volkonski » Tue Apr 02, 2019 3:27 pm

Farmers won't be compensated for millions of dollars of soybeans lost after floods and trade war

https://www.nbcnews.com/business/busine ... er-n989956
There's nothing the government can do about the millions of bushels of damaged crops in Iowa and other flooded states, since the Department of Agriculture has no program that covers the catastrophic and largely uninsured stored-crop losses from the widespread flooding that was triggered by the "bomb cyclone" that hit the region in mid-March.

The USDA last year made $12 billion in aid available to farmers who suffered trade-war losses, without needing Congressional approval. The agency has separate programs that partially cover losses from cattle killed in natural disasters, compensate farmers who cannot plant crops due to weather, and help them remove debris left in fields after floods.

But Congress would have to pass legislation to address the harvests lost in the storm, according to Agriculture Under Secretary Bill Northey and a USDA statement to Reuters.

:snippity:

Farmers will have to destroy any grains that were contaminated by floodwater, which could also prevent some growers from planting oversaturated fields.


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Re: Water Troubles

#360

Post by Addie » Tue Apr 09, 2019 11:04 am

Grist
The Midwest braces for yet another major storm

It’s been less than a month since a bomb cyclone hovered over parts of the Midwest, dumping a mix of snow, sleet, and rain on the region. The system wreaked havoc on people, animals, infrastructure, and destroyed over $440 million in crops in Nebraska alone. Now, a similar weather event is headed that way again.

Wyoming and Colorado will get a healthy coating of snow in the mountains tonight and tomorrow, but the storm won’t get really worked up until it moves into the central portion of the country midweek.

Forecasters aren’t yet sure if we can call this storm bomb cyclone 2.0, but it will bring snow, high winds, and possibly thunderstorms to the Plains and Upper Midwest starting on Wednesday. Winter storm watches are in effect in six states. Folks in the High Plains, Northern Plains, and upper Midwest are bracing for what could amount to more than 6 inches of snow, though models show the heaviest band of snow potentially delivering upwards of 30 inches in some places. ...

Since the beginning of this year, the U.S. has experienced twice the usual amount of precipitation. More than 50 flood gages — devices that monitor water levels — across the country are at moderate or major flood stages. Many of those are located in the Midwest. (For reference, moderate flooding as defined by the National Weather Service is when some buildings, roads, and airstrips are flooded or closed.) April temperatures will quickly melt snow brought in by the storm, adding more water to already-saturated areas. “This is shaping up to be a potentially unprecedented flood season, with more than 200 million people at risk for flooding in their communities,” Ed Clark, director of NOAA’s National Water Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, told CBS News.

An April storm on the heels of a March downpour isn’t just a bad coincidence. Research shows that spring flooding is one of climate change’s many disastrous side effects. As warmer springtime temperatures arrive earlier in the year, the risk of damaging floods worsens. Case in point: Over the past 60 years, “the frequency of heavy downpours has increased by 29 percent over the past 60 years” across the Great Plains, my colleague Eric Holthaus writes.



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Re: Water Troubles

#361

Post by Volkonski » Fri Apr 12, 2019 12:36 pm

Daniel Swain

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"After A $14 Billion Upgrade, #NewOrleans’ Levees Are Sinking:
#SeaLevelRise and ground subsidence will render the flood barriers inadequate in just four years." #ClimateChange #ClimateAdaptation #LAwx
https://t.co/V1FJ5bLlbG
The $14 billion network of levees and floodwalls that was built to protect greater New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina was a seemingly invincible bulwark against flooding.

But now, 11 months after the Army Corps of Engineers completed one of the largest public works projects in world history, the agency says the system will stop providing adequate protection in as little as four years because of rising sea levels and shrinking levees.

The growing vulnerability of the New Orleans area is forcing the Army Corps to begin assessing repair work, including raising hundreds of miles of levees and floodwalls that form a meandering earth and concrete fortress around the city and its adjacent suburbs.

“These systems that maybe were protecting us before are no longer going to be able to protect us without adjustments,” said Emily Vuxton, policy director of the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana, an environmental group. She said repair costs could be “hundreds of millions” of dollars, with 75% paid by federal taxpayers.
In 1982 PBS broadcast a NOVA episode titled "Goodbye Louisiana" which can be watched here-



That show seems prescient now.


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Re: Water Troubles

#362

Post by Volkonski » Fri Apr 19, 2019 10:18 am

Fire in Paradise, California, poisoned the water with 'toxic cocktail'

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/fi ... d_nn_tw_ma
Officials said they believe the contamination occurred when the November firestorm created a "toxic cocktail" of gases in burning homes that got sucked into the water pipes as residents and firefighters drew water heavily, causing a vacuum in the system that sucked in the toxic fumes, the Sacramento Bee reported Thursday.

:snippity:

"It is jaw-dropping," said Dan Newton of the state Water Resources Control Board. "This is such a huge scale. None of us were prepared for this."

Those who have assessed the problem say the water district may be able to clean pipes to some homes later this year, but it will take two years and up to $300 million before all hillside residents can safely drink, cook or bathe in the water from their taps.

About 1,500 of the town's 27,000 residents are living in the few surviving houses. Water officials have warned them not to drink, cook, bathe in or brush their teeth with tap water and to only take quick showers with warm water. Those residents are living on bottled water deliver daily and water tank deliveries.
That $300 million will come to about $11,000 per resident.


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Re: Water Troubles

#363

Post by Volkonski » Sun Apr 21, 2019 2:29 pm

Waikiki flood concerns spur push for Hawaii shore protection

https://abcnews.go.com/Travel/wireStory ... itter_abcn
Hawaii's iconic Waikiki Beach could soon be underwater as rising sea levels caused by global warming overtake its white sand beaches and bustling city streets.

That's alarming for a state where beach tourism is the primary economic driver.

So state lawmakers are trying to pass legislation that would defend against routine coastal flooding that may become the norm in as little as 15 years.

A version of one proposed bill that would create a shoreline protection plan for urban Honolulu has passed both chambers of Hawaii's Legislature.
:(

We did a family vacation there about 25 years ago. My father was stationed there for a while in WWII before heading to Iwo Jima. He and my mother visited there together shortly before his death.


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Re: Water Troubles

#364

Post by Lani » Sun Apr 21, 2019 5:40 pm

Waikiki is facing rising ocean levels, Ala Wai canal flooding, and the combination of both. Here's the Corps of Engineers prediction of Waikiki's near future.
Webp.net-resizeimage (2).gif
It was a pleasant surprise last year when Congress appropriated $345 million for a major revamp of the canal and the watersheds flowing into it, a project federal engineers say is needed to keep a massive flood from wiping out Waikiki.

Hawaii had expected less than the full amount needed for the work. But apparently the federal government thought it was a high priority to avoid a disaster that would flood an estimated 3,000 buildings and cause more than $1 billion in structural damage, not to mention shutting down the state’s biggest economic engine.

The federal appropriation comes with stipulations. Hawaii must repay $125 million of the cost, and a local jurisdiction must agree to operate and maintain the flood mitigation project.
https://www.civilbeat.org/2019/04/dont- ... l-fooding/
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Re: Water Troubles

#365

Post by Volkonski » Wed May 01, 2019 1:42 pm

Indonesia wants to move the capital from sinking Jakarta

https://www.economist.com/asia/2019/04/ ... ng-jakarta
The city’s growth has hurt the environment, too. Developers have concreted over the city’s green bits and floodplains in their haste to erect ever-taller, and heavier, office blocks; discarded plastic clogs up the rivers. As a result, floods have become more frequent and deadly. Jakarta is the world’s fastest-sinking urban area. Some neighbourhoods are dropping at a rate of 25cm per year, and researchers think that almost all of north Jakarta could be submerged in 30 years. Rising sea levels is one contributory factor. Another is that only one third of residents have access to piped water, so the rest bore holes in the ground to tap the natural reservoir beneath the city.

It is partly for these reasons that Joko Widodo, Indonesia’s president, known as Jokowi, wants to move the capital. On April 29th, after a cabinet meeting on the topic, Bambang Brodjonegoro, the head of the National Development Planning Agency, announced the government’s plans. A precise site for the new capital has not been chosen, but it will not be on Java, the island where Jakarta is located. The most likely destination is Palangkaraya, the capital of the province of Central Kalimantan, part of the Indonesian portion of Borneo (an orangutan sanctuary on the outskirts of the city is pictured above right). Not all branches of government will up sticks. Those most-closely tied to Indonesia's economy, like the central bank, will stay put.

The choice of destination highlights Jokowi’s other reason for the move: he wants to reduce regional income inequalities. Indonesia is an archipelago of 13,000 or so islands, but it is dominated by Java, which accounts for about 58% of GDP and about the same share of the population. Moving the capital to Borneo would not only ease Jakarta’s overcrowding, but also help reduce regional income gaps. Average wages are about 40% lower in Central Kalimantan than in the capital.


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Re: Water Troubles

#366

Post by Volkonski » Thu Jun 20, 2019 12:01 pm

Chennai water crisis in India leaves millions reliant on filthy wells and expensive trucked-in supply

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/chennai-wa ... 019-06-20/
Millions of people in the South Indian city of Chennai, the country's sixth largest metropolis, are facing an acute water shortage as the main reservoirs have dried up after a poor monsoon season. Some schools in the city have cut working hours and dozens of hotels and some restaurants have reportedly shut down due to the shortage.

The city of more than 4.5 million has been left to rely on wells and water brought in by truck. Thousands of wells dug across the city are leading to a rapid drop in the ground water level, and raising even further the concerns of environmentalists.

:snippity:

An alarming report last year by the Indian government's own research institute, NITI Aayog, warned that 21 Indian cities, including New Delhi, Chennai, Bengaluru, and Hyderabad, would run out of groundwater by 2020.

The report also said 40% of India's 1.34 billion people would have no access to drinking water by 2030. More than 600 million Indians are facing "acute water shortage" already, according to the report.


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Re: Water Troubles

#367

Post by Volkonski » Thu Jun 20, 2019 12:07 pm

More than 500 arrested after protests and clashes as India water crisis worsens

https://edition.cnn.com/2019/06/20/indi ... index.html
At least 550 people were arrested Wednesday in the city of Coimbatore for protesting with empty water containers in front of the municipal government's headquarters, accusing officials of negligence and mismanagement. Meanwhile, four reservoirs that supply Chennai, the state capital and India's sixth largest city, have run nearly dry.

:snippity:

People have begun fighting over water, with minor clashes across Chennai. Trucks bringing water into cities have even been hijacked and drivers attacked, said Jyoti Sharma, founder and president of FORCE, an Indian NGO working on water conservation.

:snippity:

This depletion and dependence is particularly concerning in large cities, where at least 60% of the population live in unauthorized settlements instead of government-designated residential areas, Sharma said. Around 820,000 people live in slums in Chennai, according to a 2017 report from the Tamil Nadu government.

These low-income families, without access to expensive private water tankers or rainwater harvesting systems, are almost entirely dependent on groundwater for basic needs -- and thus are hit hardest in crises like this.


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