Water Troubles

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Volkonski
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Re: Water Troubles

#251

Post by Volkonski » Thu Nov 10, 2016 12:03 pm

kate520 wrote:Not the scallops! :crying: :crying:
Yes, the scallops!!!! :crying: :crying: :crying: :crying: :crying: :crying:

Update-

Peconic Bay Scallop Season Off to 'Horrible' Start

http://patch.com/new-york/riverhead/s/f ... ontent=aol
"It's horrible," said Keith Reda, manager of Braun Seafood in Cutchogue. "We've seen less than half of what we had last year."

Reda said he's not sure what's caused the drop-off in scallops, but added some blame it on the brown tide or other environmental factors. "Nobody has a scientific reason," he said, adding that he's reached out to experts. "Nobody can give you a definite answer."

Reda added that scallops have a two-year life cycle, which means next year's yield might prove more promising.

The scarcity of the sweet morsels means prices will be higher this year, Reda said. That's bad news for fishermen and fish shop owners alike. "The price gets to a certain ceiling and people stop buying," he said.
Landings are down as much as 70% already. :shock: It is only 4 days into the season and landings are dropping quickly. Usually they stay strong for a few months. Scallop fishers won't be able to continue because they won't be able to earn enough money. So much for scallop tourism this year. :( Bad news for the restaurants, wineries and breweries.
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Re: Water Troubles

#252

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Thu Nov 10, 2016 12:09 pm

They just closed the oyster beds on the coast because of excessive rainfall, and boat ramps at our reservoir are closed because of drought.

As a friend of mine commented yesterday about the contradictions of MS weather, if you are in a jacket and long pants at the same time the mosquito truck is coming down your street, you must be in Mississippi.

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Re: Water Troubles

#253

Post by Addie » Sat Nov 12, 2016 11:19 am

MLive
Judge orders door-to-door water delivery for Flint residents

FLINT, MI – A federal judge has ordered bottled water must be delivered to Flint residents unless officials can prove there is an operating, properly-installed water filter in their home.

U.S. District Judge David M. Lawson issued a preliminary injunction Thursday, Nov. 10, that also requires residents be provided with clear and current information about the lead contamination of their water supply and notices must be presented in multiple languages, including English, Spanish, Chinese, Arabic and Hmong.

Concerned Pastors for Social Action, Flint resident Melissa Mays, the Natural Resources Defense Council, and the ACLU of Michigan sought the injunction as part of a case brought under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act.

"The Court today affirmed that all people have the right the safe drinking water, including the people of Flint, Michigan," said Dimple Chaudhary, Senior Attorney with NRDC. "The court correctly recognized that the government created this crisis, and it's the government's responsibility to ensure that all people in Flint have access to safe drinking water."

The decision requires the city and the state to provide door-to-door delivery of four cases of bottled water per week per resident unless the home is exempt from the program.
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Re: Water Troubles

#254

Post by Addie » Sat Nov 26, 2016 9:50 am

Politico
Trump win churns U.S.-Mexico water talks

Negotiations between the U.S. and Mexico to seal a water-sharing deal over the dwindling supplies on the Colorado River are confronting a new deadline: the inauguration of Donald Trump.

A 16-year drought has sent water levels at the river's most important reservoir, Lake Mead, to their lowest point since it was first filled in the 1930s, threatening supply cuts for 40 million people across seven U.S. states and two Mexican states. It’s also raising the stakes for the two countries as they try to hammer out an extension of a four-year-old agreement on how to share the water.

That agreement expires at the end of 2017, but negotiators who have worked for years are pressing to finish a new pact before President Barack Obama leaves office — or put at risk years of fruitful collaboration on the sharing of cross-border water supplies that are vital to both countries.

The fear is not only that Trump — who has called Mexicans criminals and vowed to erect a massive border wall — could derail any potential deal, but that even turning the talks over to new negotiators would stall the process at a critical moment, since it would take them months to get up to speed. ...

Farmers and cities in Arizona and Nevada could face their first cuts in water supplies a year from now, just as the existing agreement ends. Without a new agreement with Mexico, it is unclear whether or how those cuts could be shared across the border, raising the prospect of either deeper, swifter cuts to U.S. states or a bitter cross-border dispute.
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Re: Water Troubles

#255

Post by Addie » Wed Dec 07, 2016 8:07 am

Associated Press
Thousands of snow geese die in Montana after landing on contaminated water

Several thousand snow geese have died after a snowstorm forced large flocks to take refuge in the acidic, metal-laden waters of an old open pit mine in Montana.

Mark Thompson, environmental affairs manager for mine company Montana Resources, said witnesses described the pit as like “700 acres of white birds” on 28 November.

Along with Atlantic Richfield, Montana Resources is responsible for Berkeley Pit in Butte.

Since 28 November, employees of MR and Arco had used spotlights, noise makers and other efforts to scare or “haze” the birds off the water and prevent others from landing.

The companies estimated that more than 90% of the birds had been chased off by 29 November, Thompson said.
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Re: Water Troubles

#256

Post by Volkonski » Wed Dec 07, 2016 10:23 am

Meanwhile on Long Island the menhaden (aka bunker) continue to die.

There is a bit of good from this. Bunker fishing is usually not allowed these days because these fish as so important as a food fish for cod, bluefish, etc. These dead fish are being processed into fertilizer as was done in the old days.

More Than 170 Tons of Bunker Removed From Shinnecock Bay: Supervisor

http://patch.com/new-york/southampton/m ... supervisor
SOUTHAMPTON, NY — More than 170 tons of decaying, smelly dead bunker fish have been removed from Shinnecock Bay since a massive fish kill recently, said Southampton Town Supervisor Jay Schneiderman.
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Re: Water Troubles

#257

Post by Addie » Wed Dec 07, 2016 4:05 pm

The Perfect Tide: Sea Level and the Future of South Florida

[bbvideo=560,315][/bbvideo]
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Re: Water Troubles

#258

Post by Addie » Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:21 pm

USA Today
Corpus Christi: 4 cases of illness consistent with tainted water

CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas — City officials confirmed Saturday that there are four cases of people who have skin and intestinal issues consistent with exposure to contaminated water.

The Caller-Times also has confirmed that the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality's initial report shows a backflow issue at a mixing tank Dec. 7. However, it's not clear whether that was the first potential contamination or if there were even earlier backflows.

Corpus Christi is in the third day of the chemical contamination scare afflicting the city's water system.

At a news conference Saturday afternoon at City Hall, Mayor Dan McQueen said 30 water samples are being tested in Houston. It's expected those results will be ready sometime Sunday.

He was reluctant to give a timeline for when the water system might be cleared of the chemical contaminant because it's possible the chemical breached the system as early as Dec. 1.
Adding:

ABC News: Corpus Christi Lifts Water Ban After Tests Find No Corrosive
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Re: Water Troubles

#259

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Dec 20, 2016 2:41 pm

Four more officials charged with felonies in Flint water crisis
By Brady Dennis December 20 at 12:44 PM

Darlene McClendon, a sixth-grade teacher at Eisenhower Elementary School in Flint, said the water crisis has made her worry more about the future of her students. (Brittany Greeson for The Washington Post)
Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette filed another round of criminal charges Tuesday in the ongoing water crisis in Flint, the latest action in a nearly year-long investigation to hold accountable those responsible for a disaster that exposed thousands of children to dangerously high lead levels.

Schuette announced felony charges against four people, including two former state-appointed emergency managers who oversaw a disastrous switch of the city’s drinking water source to the Flint River. Darnell Earley, whom Gov. Rick Snyder (R) put in charge of the city’s finances from late 2013 through early 2015, and Gerald Ambrose, who held the emergency manager position through April 2015, could face decades in prison.

Prosecutors allege that the emergency managers conspired with two Flint employees, public works Superintendent Howard Croft and utilities Administrator Daugherty Johnson, to enter into a contract under false pretenses that bound the city to use the river for its drinking water, even though the local water plant was in no condition to properly deliver safe water to residents.

Even after the officials were told repeatedly that the Flint water department wasn’t ready to make the switch in 2014 and that the city should keep getting its water from Detroit, investigators say Earley and Ambrose pushed the change forward in a bid to save money. The decision ultimately exposed children and other residents to lead-tainted water and resulted in the death of a dozen people from Legionnaire’s disease.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/ene ... er-crisis/

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Re: Water Troubles

#260

Post by Addie » Tue Dec 20, 2016 8:25 pm

Reuters
Special Report: Thousands of U.S. areas afflicted with lead poisoning beyond Flint's ...

In all, Reuters found nearly 3,000 areas with recently recorded lead poisoning rates at least double those in Flint during the peak of that city’s contamination crisis. And more than 1,100 of these communities had a rate of elevated blood tests at least four times higher.

The poisoned places on this map stretch from Warren, Pennsylvania, a town on the Allegheny River where 36 percent of children tested had high lead levels, to a zip code on Goat Island, Texas, where a quarter of tests showed poisoning. In some pockets of Baltimore, Cleveland and Philadelphia, where lead poisoning has spanned generations, the rate of elevated tests over the last decade was 40-50 percent.

Like Flint, many of these localities are plagued by legacy lead: crumbling paint, plumbing, or industrial waste left behind. Unlike Flint, many have received little attention or funding to combat poisoning.

To identify these locations, Reuters examined neighborhood-level blood testing results, most of which have not been previously disclosed. The data, obtained from state health departments and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, tracks poisoning rates among children tested in each location. ...

Reuters found 2,606 census tracts, and another 278 zip code areas, with a prevalence of lead poisoning at least twice Flint’s rate.
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Re: Water Troubles

#261

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Dec 20, 2016 9:04 pm

I guess the new administration will archive the report in the round folder asap. :(

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Re: Water Troubles

#262

Post by kate520 » Tue Dec 20, 2016 9:21 pm

Our society's indifference to infrastructure is shocking to me. We have arrived at an inescapable irony - the election is the only possible result of 30 years of a public policy in which money trumps everything.

Raise taxes to pay for it? Sorry, Johnny in Georgia needs the $200 rebate this cut will bring more than you need safe water or safe bridges or or or. And Mr GE can now add 1000 jobs with the money he saves. Isn't that amazing? The jobs are coming home, boys!

:liar:
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Re: Water Troubles

#263

Post by Suranis » Thu Dec 22, 2016 8:45 am

If its any comfort, its not only America. The stupid resistance of Irish people to actually paying for the clean water we drink is mind boggling.
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Re: Water Troubles

#264

Post by Lunaluz » Mon Jan 16, 2017 6:06 pm

I was listening to NPR today, like always.. and an hour program called Reveal came on, all about the the water issues .. it is really fascinating and scary..below is a link to the episode and talks at some length about California, Yemen and various other places. Well worth the hour you will spend listening. The episode is called Water Wars.

https://www.revealnews.org/

:snippity: Next to the air we breathe, it’s the planet’s most precious resource: fresh water. And it’s disappearing. In this episode of Reveal, we look at what’s happening in places that already are running out of water. :snippity:
I have listened to most of their episodes, they are very good.

*Edited for typing poorly

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Re: Water Troubles

#265

Post by Azastan » Mon Jan 16, 2017 6:16 pm

Lunaluz wrote:I have listening to NPR today, like always.. and an hour program called Reveal came on, all about the the water issues .. it is really fascinating and scary..below is a link to the episode and talks at some length about California, Yemen and various other places. Well worth the hour you will spend listening. The episode is called Water Wars.
My brother, who used to live in Modesto, bought a house in a subdivision where not one house was on a water meter, per se. The houses were charged agricultural water use rates. I think that water meters were finally installed, but for decades, he paid virtually nothing for water, and he had no incentive, other than his own morality, to conserve water.

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Re: Water Troubles

#266

Post by Addie » Fri Jan 20, 2017 11:30 am

Perhaps only Volki will have the patience and interest to read this very long piece in The New Yorker about the water tunnels under Manhattan, published in 2003. I've read about these tunnels and the sand hogs, but I guess I missed this fascinating and worthy read.
City Of Water ...

Until that moment, I had only heard tales of New York City’s invisible empire, an elaborate maze of tunnels that goes as deep as the Chrysler Building is high. Under construction in one form or another for more than a century, the system of waterways and pipelines spans thousands of miles and comprises nineteen reservoirs and three lakes. Two main tunnels provide New York City with most of the 1.3 billion gallons of water it consumes each day, ninety per cent of which is pumped in from reservoirs upstate by the sheer force of gravity. Descending through aqueducts from as high as fourteen hundred feet above sea level, the water gathers speed, racing down to a thousand feet below sea level when it reaches the pipes beneath the city.

It is a third water tunnel, however, that is the most critical. Designed to meet expanding demand and to serve as a backup system in case something ever happens to City Tunnel No. 1 or City Tunnel No. 2, City Tunnel No. 3 has been under development since 1969, and was initially billed as “the greatest nondefense construction project in the history of Western Civilization.” Already, twenty-four people have died building it—roughly a man a mile—and it is not expected to be completed until 2020.

As an engineering feat, the water-tunnel system rivals the Brooklyn Bridge and the Panama Canal. Yet it has the odd distinction that almost no one will ever see it, save for the sandhogs who are building it. Over the years, the men have constructed an entire city under the city, a subterranean world as cluttered as the Manhattan skyline: it includes four hundred and thirty-eight miles of subway lines, six thousand miles of sewers, and thousands of miles of gas mains. “If it’s deeper than a grave,” sandhogs often say, “then we built it.” The water tunnels have become the sandhogs’ greatest and most elusive achievement, an often deadly effort that has consumed generations. “I’ll take you down there if you want,” Jimmy Ryan had said when I asked him to show me the tunnel’s newest section. “But, trust me, it ain’t like Macy’s down there.” ...

The valves were designed, Ryan said, to open and close guillotine-like gates inside the cylindrical tunnels, stopping the flow of water. But they had become so brittle with age that they were no longer operable. “They’re afraid if they try to shut the valves they won’t be able to turn ’em back on,” Ryan said.

He wiped some mud from his eyes. “Look,” he said. “If one of those tunnels goes, this city will be completely shut down. In some places there won’t be water for anything. Hospitals. Drinking. Fires. It would make September 11th look like nothing.”
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Re: Water Troubles

#267

Post by Volkonski » Sat Jan 21, 2017 1:12 pm

Good article.

The infrastructure of Manhattan is fascinating. Its 23 square miles are home to over 1.6 million people and another 1.6 million people commute into Manhattan every day. Most everything in the way of infrastructure is underground- power, gas, water, sewers, phone/data lines, subways, commuter and Amtrak rail, road tunnels, etc.
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Re: Water Troubles

#268

Post by Addie » Mon Jan 23, 2017 8:42 am

The Hill
Trump's infrastructure plans will hamper access to clean water

Since Donald Trump unveiled his infrastructure plan, many have written that it should be called a privatization plan, and rightly so.

The New York Times’ Paul Krugman termed it a “privatization scam” and former Obama assistant Ronald A. Klain called it a “massive corporate welfare plan.”

What has received less attention, however, is the devastating impact Trump’s plan could have on our nation’s water systems. As members of Congress concerned with the infrastructure crisis prepare to work with (and stand up to) Trump, there are a set of facts they should know when it comes to our water.

First, Trump’s plan could deepen the private industry’s reach, prioritizing corporate profit over people’s access to water. The plan essentially amounts to a $136 billion corporate tax credit that stands to make corporations richer without addressing much-needed infrastructure improvement.

While Trump’s plan does not explicitly name the private water industry, the industry knows an opportunity to fill its coffers when it sees it. Since the election, a leading private water trade group has voiced its support of Trump, noting that it is “eager to work with [his] administration to open the door” to the industry’s own pro-privatization policy agenda.
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Re: Water Troubles

#269

Post by tek » Mon Jan 23, 2017 6:31 pm

Oh my.

One of my neighbors is a well-respected water-resources expert. Gonna need to have an end-of-the-driveway conversation with her about this.

She has gone head-to-head with several privatized water companies that basically raped the cities that sold out to them.

edit: THIS neighbor:
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Re: Water Troubles

#270

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Sat Feb 11, 2017 7:28 pm

Jackson has a population of about 200,000 people and over half of them are under a boil water notice for the foreseeable future. One 48" water main has been broken for 3 weeks and another broke a week ago. They are both spewing water like geysers so god only knows how many millions of gallons have already been wasted. They tried to fix one yesterday but the damage was so much more extensive than they realized they just basically backed out, turned the water back on and said they'll be back when they can figure out how to fix it. Meanwhile, we've had zero water pressure for 2 days, restaurants are closing all over town, the mayoral candidates are passing out free water and we're under another fucking boil water notice. We get the notices half a dozen times a year due to neighborhood water main breaks (usually 12" lines, though) and they last about 3 days at the time. This time, they're estimating at least 2 weeks.

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Re: Water Troubles

#271

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Sat Feb 11, 2017 11:45 pm

Sugar Magnolia wrote:Jackson has a population of about 200,000 people and over half of them are under a boil water notice for the foreseeable future. One 48" water main has been broken for 3 weeks and another broke a week ago. They are both spewing water like geysers so god only knows how many millions of gallons have already been wasted. They tried to fix one yesterday but the damage was so much more extensive than they realized they just basically backed out, turned the water back on and said they'll be back when they can figure out how to fix it. Meanwhile, we've had zero water pressure for 2 days, restaurants are closing all over town, the mayoral candidates are passing out free water and we're under another fucking boil water notice. We get the notices half a dozen times a year due to neighborhood water main breaks (usually 12" lines, though) and they last about 3 days at the time. This time, they're estimating at least 2 weeks.
That's ridiculous! Someone has not been doing any maintenance work or planning. How are the Generals going to play decent baseball without water?
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Re: Water Troubles

#272

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Sun Feb 12, 2017 5:44 am

Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Sugar Magnolia wrote:Jackson has a population of about 200,000 people and over half of them are under a boil water notice for the foreseeable future. One 48" water main has been broken for 3 weeks and another broke a week ago. They are both spewing water like geysers so god only knows how many millions of gallons have already been wasted. They tried to fix one yesterday but the damage was so much more extensive than they realized they just basically backed out, turned the water back on and said they'll be back when they can figure out how to fix it. Meanwhile, we've had zero water pressure for 2 days, restaurants are closing all over town, the mayoral candidates are passing out free water and we're under another fucking boil water notice. We get the notices half a dozen times a year due to neighborhood water main breaks (usually 12" lines, though) and they last about 3 days at the time. This time, they're estimating at least 2 weeks.
That's ridiculous! Someone has not been doing any maintenance work or planning. How are the Generals going to play decent baseball without water?
They don't play in Jackson, MS, they're in Jackson, TN. Our team is the MS Braves in Pearl. We lost our Mets affiliate years ago and had to make do with increasingly more amateur teams for years before the Braves moved in and killed the remains of even the wooden bat Cotton States League. Nolan Ryan moved the Mets to Round Rock and baseball was never the same here. But we did get to know some players who wound up famous in the MLB. Several of them kept homes here in the off-season or came back here to live. Pitchers and catchers starts today!

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Re: Water Troubles

#273

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Feb 12, 2017 7:30 am

Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Sugar Magnolia wrote:Jackson has a population of about 200,000 people and over half of them are under a boil water notice for the foreseeable future. One 48" water main has been broken for 3 weeks and another broke a week ago. They are both spewing water like geysers so god only knows how many millions of gallons have already been wasted. They tried to fix one yesterday but the damage was so much more extensive than they realized they just basically backed out, turned the water back on and said they'll be back when they can figure out how to fix it. Meanwhile, we've had zero water pressure for 2 days, restaurants are closing all over town, the mayoral candidates are passing out free water and we're under another fucking boil water notice. We get the notices half a dozen times a year due to neighborhood water main breaks (usually 12" lines, though) and they last about 3 days at the time. This time, they're estimating at least 2 weeks.
That's ridiculous! Someone has not been doing any maintenance work or planning. How are the Generals going to play decent baseball without water?
Tweet your problem to Teh Donald! He promised that as potus he will have the whole infrastructure fixed immediately by Executive Order :!:

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Re: Water Troubles

#274

Post by Addie » Sun Feb 12, 2017 9:09 pm

SacBee
BREAKING: Marysville, Yuba County evacuated as Oroville spillway collapse feared

Heavy traffic amid evacuation

5:59 p.m.

Aerial photos show traffic backed up along Highway 70 as people from Oroville try to escape to the north.

Flows boosted to try to avoid collapse

5:52 p.m.

Releases through the main spillway at Oroville Dam have been boosted to 100,000 cubic feet per second from 55,000 cfs in hopes of easing pressure on the emergency spillway before a failure occurs, officials said Sunday night.

Kevin Dossey, a Department of Water Resources engineer and spokesman said “it might help” to alleviate the pressure.

So far, Dossey said, the emergency spillway’s concrete lip at the top has not crumbled, although the hillside had “eroded to within several feet” of the big concrete structure.
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Re: Water Troubles

#275

Post by Dan1100 » Sun Feb 12, 2017 9:12 pm

Addie wrote:SacBee
BREAKING: Marysville, Yuba County evacuated as Oroville spillway collapse feared

Heavy traffic amid evacuation

5:59 p.m.

Aerial photos show traffic backed up along Highway 70 as people from Oroville try to escape to the north.

Flows boosted to try to avoid collapse

5:52 p.m.

Releases through the main spillway at Oroville Dam have been boosted to 100,000 cubic feet per second from 55,000 cfs in hopes of easing pressure on the emergency spillway before a failure occurs, officials said Sunday night.

Kevin Dossey, a Department of Water Resources engineer and spokesman said “it might help” to alleviate the pressure.

So far, Dossey said, the emergency spillway’s concrete lip at the top has not crumbled, although the hillside had “eroded to within several feet” of the big concrete structure.
To give some perspective, the typical summer flow of the Mississippi in St. Louis is about 100,000 cubic feet per second. That's a lot of water.
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