Water Troubles

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Water Troubles

#1

Post by Addie » Tue Aug 05, 2014 9:03 am

[link]New York Times,http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/05/us/li ... again.html[/link]





Behind Toledo’s Water Crisis, a Long-Troubled Lake Erie





TOLEDO, Ohio — It took a serendipitous slug of toxins and the loss of drinking water for a half-million residents to bring home what scientists and government officials in this part of the country have been saying for years: Lake Erie is in trouble, and getting worse by the year.





Flooded by tides of phosphorus washed from fertilized farms, cattle feedlots and leaky septic systems, the most intensely developed of the Great Lakes is increasingly being choked each summer by thick mats of algae, much of it poisonous. What plagues Toledo and, experts say, potentially all 11 million lakeside residents, is increasingly a serious problem across the United States.





But while there is talk of action — and particularly in Ohio, real action — there also is widespread agreement that efforts to address the problem have fallen woefully short. And the troubles are not restricted to the Great Lakes. Poisonous algae are found in polluted inland lakes from Minnesota to Nebraska to California, and even in the glacial-era kettle ponds of Cape Cod in Massachusetts. ...





Lake Erie’s travails — and now, Toledo’s — are but the most visible manifestation of a pollution problem that has grown as easily as it has defied solution. Once the shining success of the environmental movement — Lake Erie was mocked as dead in the 1960s, then revived by clean-water rules — it has sunk into crisis again as urbanization and industrial agriculture have spawned new and potent sources of phosphorus runoff.
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#2

Post by Addie » Wed Aug 06, 2014 8:33 am

[link]Reuters,http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/08/05/m ... nnecticut/[/link]





Man-made ‘dead zone’ in the Gulf of Mexico is the size of Connecticut





ORLANDO Fla. (Reuters) – Scientists say a man-made “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico is as big as the state of Connecticut.





The zone, which at about 5,000 square miles (13,000 sq km) is the second largest in the world but still smaller than in previous years, is so named because it contains no oxygen, or too little, at the Gulf floor to support bottom-dwelling fish and shrimp.





The primary cause of the annual phenomenon is excess nutrient runoff from farms along the Mississippi River, which empties into the Gulf, said Gene Turner, a researcher at Louisiana State University’s Coastal Ecology Institute.





The nutrients feed algae growth, which consumes oxygen when it works its way to the Gulf bottom, he said.
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#3

Post by Volkonski » Wed Aug 06, 2014 10:32 am

Darn dams. :( But some good water news-Six years ago, there were no alewives here. This summer, Mr. Gray expects 3 million. The fish arrive here, awaiting a lift over the 27-foot high hydroelectric dam in a $1 million hydraulic fish elevator, because two dams downstream have been demolished. The first “class” of alewives that hatched in lakes upstream after the dam removals are now returning by the millions after four years at sea, eager to spawn. “What you are looking at is a change in the mind-set of humanity toward what wealth is,” says Gray.[/break1]csmonitor.com/Environment/2014/0803/Setting-rivers-free-As-dams-are-torn-down-nature-is-quickly-recovering?cmpid=editorpicks&google_editors_picks=true]http://www.csmonitor.com/Environment/20 ... picks=trueFirst you get alewives then you get the bigger fish and birds that eat the alewives. :D
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#4

Post by DejaMoo » Wed Aug 06, 2014 12:10 pm

[link]New York Times,http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/05/us/li ... again.html[/link]





Behind Toledo’s Water Crisis, a Long-Troubled Lake Erie





Flooded by tides of phosphorus washed from fertilized farms, cattle feedlots and leaky septic systems


They left out another contributor: lawns. Lawn fertilizer is a significant polluter of bodies of water. Grass clippings, if left on streets driveways to wash into storm sewers, also contribute phosphorus and nitrogen to the water, hence the advice to sweep clippings from pavement after mowing. Actually, any soft plant tissue (leaves, grass, non-woody stems) will leach phosphorus as they decay, so best water management practices including cleaning all such materials from hard surfaces and if possible have a wide shelter belt of native plants and grasses at shorelines. Lawns going right to the water's edge will pollute the water.





We need to get away from the obsession with deep green, weed-free lawns. It's unhealthy, it requires too much effort, water, and frequent applications of chemicals to maintain, and it's unnatural. It's hard on bees, too. Dandelions and clover are excellent bee plants, producing dozens to hundreds of blossoms within a short flying distance. More food for less work for the bees. If we just relax our standards about what constitutes an acceptable lawn, we'll see such improvement in the environment.
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Water Troubles

#5

Post by Addie » Wed Aug 06, 2014 4:22 pm

[link]Christian Science Monitor,http://www.csmonitor.com/Environment/En ... se-by-2040[/link]





Water for drinking or fracking? Why we may have to choose by 2040.





A set of studies based on three years of research concludes that by 2040, the need for drinking water and water for use in energy production will create dire shortages.





Conventional electricity generation is the largest source of water use in most countries. Water is used to cool power plants to keep them functional. Most power utilities don’t even record the amount of water they use. ...





The research, which included projections of the availability of water and the growth of the world’s population, found that by 2020, between 30 percent and 40 percent of the planet will no longer have direct access to clean drinking water. The problem could be made even worse if climate change accelerates, creating more heat and causing more water evaporation.





That means humankind must decide how water is used, Sovacool says. “Do we want to spend it on keeping the power plants going or as drinking water? We don’t have enough water to do both,” he says.
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#6

Post by Addie » Thu Aug 07, 2014 8:30 pm

[link]Reuters,http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/08/ ... ws&rpc=401[/link]





Massive red tide bloom washing off Florida's Gulf of Mexico coast





Aug 7 (Reuters) - The largest red tide bloom seen in Florida in nearly a decade has killed thousands of fish in the Gulf of Mexico and may pose a greater health threat if it washes ashore as expected in the next two weeks, researchers said on Thursday.





The patchy bloom stretches from the curve of the Panhandle to the central Tampa Bay region. It measures approximately 80 miles (130 km) long by 50 miles (80 km) wide.





Red tide occurs when naturally occurring algae bloom out of control, producing toxins deadly to fish and other marine life. The odorless chemicals can trigger respiratory distress in people, such as coughing and wheezing.





"It could have large impacts if it were to move inshore," said Brandon Basino, a spokesman for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). "It has been killing a lot of marine species, especially fish, as it waits offshore."
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#7

Post by Volkonski » Mon Aug 18, 2014 12:56 pm

Tibet's glaciers have shrunken by 15% over last 30 years. That's a loss of 3100 square miles.(Reuters) - The Tibetan plateau, whose glaciers supply water to hundreds of millions of people in Asia, were warmer over the past 50 years than at any stage in the past two millennia, a Chinese newspaper said, citing an academic report.Temperatures and humidity are likely to continue to rise throughout this century, causing glaciers to retreat and desertification to spread, according to the report published by the Chinese Academy of Sciences' Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research."Over the past 50 years, the rate of temperature rise has been double the average global level," it said, according to the report on the website of Science and Technology Daily, a state-run newspaper.Glacier retreat could disrupt water supply to several of Asia's main rivers that originate from the plateau, including China's Yellow and Yangtze, India's Brahmaputra, and the Mekong and Salween in Southeast Asia.[/break1]reuters.com/article/2014/08/14/us-china-climatechange-idUKKBN0GE09520140814]http://uk.reuters.com/article/2014/08/1 ... 9520140814
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#8

Post by Addie » Wed Aug 27, 2014 8:21 am

NPR Drought-Stricken Texas Town Turns To Toilets For WaterThe city of Wichita Falls, Texas, may soon become the first in the country where half of the drinking water comes directly from wastewater.Water supplies are still expected to run out in two years.So the city has built a 13-mile pipeline that connects its wastewater plant directly to the plant where water is purified for drinking. That means the waste that residents flush down their toilets will be part of what's cleaned up and sent back to them through the tap.
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#9

Post by Volkonski » Wed Aug 27, 2014 8:36 am

Houston gets its water from Dallas' waste treatment plants. Our Texas city also gets its water from the Trinity River. We're handling right now about 135-140 million gallons [of raw sewage] per day, said Bill Tatum, manager of TRA Central Regional Wastewater System.It s a little known fact outside science circles, but a truth in Texas for decades. Wastewater from the (Dallas/FW) Metroplex flows downstream 250 miles in the Trinity River and into Lake Livingston where Houston gets most of its water.Normally, the wastewater gets diluted by rainwater and runoff, but not during the drought of 2011.Last year it was almost 100 percent of it. On any given summer month, it's 95 to 97 percent of it, Clingenpeel explained. http://www.khou.com/story/local/2014/08/27/11671664/
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#10

Post by Somerset » Wed Aug 27, 2014 10:33 am

Houston gets its water from Dallas' waste treatment plants. Our Texas city also gets its water from the Trinity River.We're handling right now about 135-140 million gallons [of raw sewage] per day, said Bill Tatum, manager of TRA Central Regional Wastewater System.It s a little known fact outside science circles, but a truth in Texas for decades. Wastewater from the (Dallas/FW) Metroplex flows downstream 250 miles in the Trinity River and into Lake Livingston where Houston gets most of its water.Normally, the wastewater gets diluted by rainwater and runoff, but not during the drought of 2011.Last year it was almost 100 percent of it. On any given summer month, it's 95 to 97 percent of it, Clingenpeel explained.Been doing this here for quite a whilehttp://www.pub.gov.sg/about/historyfuture/Pages/NEWater.aspx

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#11

Post by Volkonski » Thu Aug 28, 2014 12:49 pm

Something more to worry about-


Brain-Eating Amoeba Found in Louisiana Water Supply


Louisiana officials have cautioned residents to be careful after a deadly brain-eating amoeba was found in a parish water supply. The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals announced that the Naegleria fowleri amoeba was found in the water system of St. John the Baptist Parish.





The microscopic amoeba can be deadly if contaminated water travels through the nose to the brain. The microscopic pathogen can cause a deadly form of meningitis that or a swelling of the brain and surrounding tissues.





The amoeba cannot be contracted from drinking contaminated water, officials said.





Snip-------





The disease is almost always fatal. In the U.S. between 1963 and 2013, just three people out of 132 managed to survive the infection, according to the CDC.


http://abcnews.go.com/Health/brain-eati ... picks=true
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#12

Post by Whatever4 » Fri Aug 29, 2014 12:36 am

Something more to worry about- Brain-Eating Amoeba Found in Louisiana Water Supply That explains so much...
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#13

Post by Sam the Centipede » Fri Aug 29, 2014 3:34 am

That explains so much...Poor amoeba,it could get very hungry.

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#14

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Fri Aug 29, 2014 4:53 am

That explains so much...The worst thing about that is that it's so close to Middendorf's.

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#15

Post by Addie » Thu Oct 09, 2014 9:26 am

Climate Central









Sea Level Rise Making Floods Routine for Coastal Cities



Coastal American cities are sinking into saturated new realities, new analysis has confirmed. Sea level rise has given a boost to high tides, which are regularly overtopping streets, floorboards and other low-lying areas that had long existed in relatively dehydrated harmony with nearby waterfronts. The trend is projected to worsen sharply in the coming years.



A new report, released by the Union of Concerned Scientists late on Tuesday, forecasts that by 2030, at least 180 floods will strike during high tides every year in Annapolis, Md. In some cases, such flooding will occur twice in a single day, since tides come in and out about two times daily. By 2045, that’s also expected be the case in Washington, D.C., Atlantic City, N.J. and 14 other East Coast and Gulf Coast locations out of 52 analyzed by the Union of Concerned Scientists.



“The shock for us was that tidal flooding could become the new normal in the next 15 years; we didn’t think it would be so soon,” said Melanie Fitzpatrick, one of three researchers at the nonprofit who analyzed tide gauge data and sea level projections, producing soused prognoses for scores of coastal Americans. “If you live on a coast and haven’t seen coastal flooding yet, just give it a few years. You will.”



The group originally set out to study increased risks of storm surges and hurricanes as seas rose, but quickly changed tack.



“We realized before we even got through the statistics of the last 40 years that tidal flooding is a much bigger story,” Fitzpatrick said. “But nobody’s really telling that story.”






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#16

Post by Addie » Sat Oct 18, 2014 6:51 am

The New Yorker









Retreat from the Water’s Edge



Nearly two years after Hurricane Sandy, New York has begun a “managed retreat” from some low-lying areas that are vulnerable to flooding and storm surges. Many residents of the Oakwood Beach section of Staten Island have opted into a program that allows them to sell their homes at pre-Sandy value, to the State of New York, which intends to return hundreds of parcels of land to nature. The cleared neighborhood will then serve as a buffer zone to protect other parts of the island. The program has been extended to other areas of Staten Island and Long Island that are at continued risk of flooding in the face of climate-change-related events. In this video, residents describe their experiences with the buyout program, and urban planners explain why communities along the East Coast need to consider moving away from the water’s edge.






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#17

Post by Volkonski » Sat Oct 18, 2014 10:36 am







The New Yorker







Retreat from the Water’s Edge



Nearly two years after Hurricane Sandy, New York has begun a “managed retreat” from some low-lying areas that are vulnerable to flooding and storm surges. Many residents of the Oakwood Beach section of Staten Island have opted into a program that allows them to sell their homes at pre-Sandy value, to the State of New York, which intends to return hundreds of parcels of land to nature. The cleared neighborhood will then serve as a buffer zone to protect other parts of the island. The program has been extended to other areas of Staten Island and Long Island that are at continued risk of flooding in the face of climate-change-related events. In this video, residents describe their experiences with the buyout program, and urban planners explain why communities along the East Coast need to consider moving away from the water’s edge.











Interesting. I wonder if they will be offering it out here on the North Fork?
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#18

Post by Addie » Fri Oct 24, 2014 9:44 pm

Think Progress





Largest City In South America Could Run Out Of Water In 100 Days





It’s one in the morning, and dozens of people are lining up at a series of public water taps in the Brazilian town of Itu, in the state of São Paulo. Most of the people that come to the taps at this early hour are elderly or families with children. They do so in order to avoid the large crowds that flock to the area seeking water throughout the day. “Yesterday I got here at five in the morning and there were six people. There were 60 people in line behind me by the time I left,” one of the locals told the Brazilian newspaper Folha de São Paulo.

This scene is repeating itself across the state, which is home to the seventh-largest metropolitan region in the world and responsible for a third of Brazil’s GDP. It is going through its worst drought in almost a century — the worst spring drought in history. During the last rainy season (October-February), São Paulo only received between a third and a half of its normal amount of rain. Since then it has only seen about 40 percent of the normal amount. The region is running dangerously low on water, with its reservoirs operating at under five percent capacity. The rainy season — which was supposed to start in late September or early October — is a month late, and no significant rains are predicted anytime soon. Some sources estimate the state, which is home to 44 million people, could run dry in less than 100 days.

“If the drought continues, residents will face more dramatic water shortages in the short term,” Vicente Andreu, the president of Brazil’s National Water Agency, told reporters. “If it doesn’t rain, we run the risk that the region will have a collapse like we’ve never seen before.”

In the city of São Paulo — South America’s largest — at least 60 percent of residents have experienced water shortages in the past month. The main reservoir feeding the city has become a dry bed of cracked earth. Volume is so low that authorities had to build 2 miles of pipes in order to salvage the remaining water. Reservoirs across the state are experiencing similarly low volumes. Cantareira, the biggest reservoir in the state, currently holds 3.2 percent of its normal load.



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#19

Post by Scratch » Sat Oct 25, 2014 11:41 am







The New Yorker







Retreat from the Water’s Edge



Nearly two years after Hurricane Sandy, New York has begun a “managed retreat” from some low-lying areas that are vulnerable to flooding and storm surges. Many residents of the Oakwood Beach section of Staten Island have opted into a program that allows them to sell their homes at pre-Sandy value, to the State of New York, which intends to return hundreds of parcels of land to nature. The cleared neighborhood will then serve as a buffer zone to protect other parts of the island. The program has been extended to other areas of Staten Island and Long Island that are at continued risk of flooding in the face of climate-change-related events. In this video, residents describe their experiences with the buyout program, and urban planners explain why communities along the East Coast need to consider moving away from the water’s edge.













I read that article recently. I'm reminded of a photo I once saw of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina - it was of a community somewhere on the Gulf Coast that had been literally scoured away, with the exception of one house still standing, because the owners had chosen to build it extra strong in order to withstand hurricanes.



Their effort and expense was for naught though, since there was no longer any neighborhood or infrastructure around them and no plans to rebuild.

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#20

Post by Addie » Tue Dec 09, 2014 9:14 am

Al Jazeera











Maldives Capital Runs Out Of Water; Fire At Desal Plant Prompts Bottled Water Air- And Sealift

The Maldives, a tiny island nation in the Indian Ocean, has run out of water. A popular tourist destination surrounded by pristine seas and turquoise-blue ocean vistas, the archipelago has declared a state of emergency after a fire at its only desalination plant led to the shortage that has affected the 130,000 inhabitants of the capital, Male.

Residents of Male are receiving bottled and desalinated water provided by neighboring countries via public taps and mobile vehicles, according to a statement issued by the United Nations on Monday.

The water crisis, which began on Dec. 4, has angered local residents, who attacked shops that rationed mineral water. Hotels in the island group said their supplies were running out.

India, China, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka rushed to airlift bottled water and provide aid to the thirsty nation as the taps ran dry. Syed Akbaruddin, India's Foreign Ministry spokesman, on Friday said his government was sending five aircraft with water and two ships with parts that could help fix the machinery at the plant.






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#21

Post by Addie » Sat Dec 13, 2014 10:52 am

LA Times







Sao Paulo, Brazil, officials downplay water crisis as residents suffer ...

Brazil is extremely rich in natural resources, including water. But Sao Paulo, one of the world's largest metropolitan areas, with at least 20 million people, has a relatively sparse water supply largely reliant on six reservoirs filled by rain. Development has destroyed crucial forest cover for watersheds and springs, leaving the city, after a particularly dry season, at serious risk of running out of water.



At this point, the drought is the worst in the region in eight decades, and other urban areas in southeastern Brazil, such as Rio de Janeiro, are also at risk. In the short term, authorities acknowledge, all that can be done is to radically reduce consumption and pray for rain.



Brazil's long-range water supply future could be further affected by the deforestation of huge portions of the Amazon rainforest. In addition, authorities are being accused of poor planning and attempting to mask the city's plight for political reasons. ...



"It is impossible to overstate how bad this could be," said Charles Fishman, author of "The Big Thirst," a book on the threats to water supplies worldwide. "No matter how much money is thrown at the problem, there is no conceivable short-term Plan B. There aren't enough water tankers in the world to supply this region in Brazil."



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#22

Post by Addie » Tue Dec 16, 2014 3:52 pm

USA Today







11 trillion gallons of water needed to end Calif. drought



About 11 trillion gallons of water is needed to end the drought in California, NASA announced Tuesday.



That's about 130,000 Rose Bowls full of water.

Even with the recent storms that have hit the state, they aren't nearly enough to end the multiyear drought, scientists say.



"It takes years to get into a drought of this severity, and it will likely take many more big storms, and years, to crawl out of it," said Jay Famiglietti, a scientist with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.



NASA used data from its "Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment" satellites to develop the first-ever calculation of this kind — the volume of water required to end a drought.



As of the most recent U.S. Drought Monitor, released Thursday, 99.7% of the state of California was in a drought. However, this week's monitor may show some improvement once the rain and snow from last week's "Pineapple Express" storm is factored in.








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#23

Post by esseff44 » Tue Dec 16, 2014 7:34 pm







USA Today





11 trillion gallons of water needed to end Calif. drought



About 11 trillion gallons of water is needed to end the drought in California, NASA announced Tuesday.



That's about 130,000 Rose Bowls full of water.

Even with the recent storms that have hit the state, they aren't nearly enough to end the multiyear drought, scientists say.



"It takes years to get into a drought of this severity, and it will likely take many more big storms, and years, to crawl out of it," said Jay Famiglietti, a scientist with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.



NASA used data from its "Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment" satellites to develop the first-ever calculation of this kind — the volume of water required to end a drought.



As of the most recent U.S. Drought Monitor, released Thursday, 99.7% of the state of California was in a drought. However, this week's monitor may show some improvement once the rain and snow from last week's "Pineapple Express" storm is factored in.













http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/data/geo/index ... llite=west





Yes, well, factor this!





This one is very pretty. Try it with the rock feature.



http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/goes/west/nepac/flash-wv.html

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#24

Post by Volkonski » Tue Dec 16, 2014 7:48 pm

You know, I recall hearing that it never rained in California. Seemed to have been true the last few years but now they are getting all this rain. Probably my fault for getting my climatological info from pop songs. ;)
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#25

Post by magdalen77 » Tue Dec 16, 2014 7:52 pm

My one co-worker was in Sacramento last week for training. She said it rained most of the week and it was hilarious seeing people's reactions to the rain.

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