Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

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Addie
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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#401

Post by Addie » Sat May 11, 2019 12:18 pm

New York Times
He Crossed the Atlantic in a Barrel. We Asked Him About Dodging Ships and Using ‘La Toilette.’

The French adventurer Jean-Jacques Savin spent over four months alone, floating across the Atlantic Ocean. “It’s freedom,” he said.



On a journey across the Atlantic Ocean, the French adventurer Jean-Jacques Savin spent 127 days alone in a large, barrel-shaped capsule made of plywood, at the mercy of the winds and currents. He had no television. No Facebook or Twitter.

In December, Mr. Savin, a former military parachutist, pilot and park ranger in Africa, set sail from the Canary Islands, the Spanish archipelago west of Morocco, in the orange vessel he built. It measures about 10 feet long and 6 feet 8 inches wide.

Last week, on May 2, Mr. Savin, 72, completed his 3,125-nautical-mile trip on the Dutch Caribbean island of St. Eustatius.

On Thursday, we spoke with Mr. Savin by phone from Martinique, where he was preparing his return to France by plane, and his barrel’s return to Europe by boat.

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MRich
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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#402

Post by MRich » Tue May 21, 2019 9:52 pm

I listened to this on NPR's "Fresh Air" today - lots of food for thought for those dealing with the potential of dementia in themselves or their parents:


(If you don't want to listen, the show is transcribed at the link)

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p0rtia
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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#403

Post by p0rtia » Wed May 22, 2019 6:30 am

TImely, MRich. Thanks. :bighug:
No matter where you go, there you are! :towel:
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Addie
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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#404

Post by Addie » Fri May 24, 2019 9:58 am

Cross-posting

CNBC
Bipartisan retirement bill clears House, moves closer to becoming law

Lawmakers in the House of Representatives have passed a bill that aims to improve the nation’s retirement savings, moving it a step closer to becoming law.

Called the Secure Act and backed by both Republicans and Democrats, the measure includes a variety of provisions intended to increase the ranks of savers and the amount they put away.

Changes include: making it easier for small businesses to band together to offer 401(k) plans, requiring businesses to let long-term, part-time workers become eligible for retirement benefits and repealing the maximum age for making contributions to traditional individual retirement accounts (right now, that’s 70½).

It also would raise the age when required minimum distributions, or RMDs, from certain retirement accounts must start to age 72, from 70½, along with making changes to allow more annuities to be offered in 401(k) plans.

“We continue to be optimistic that we’ll move this bill over the goal line,” said Paul Richman, chief government and political affairs officer at the Insured Retirement Institute. “It’s likely that before the end of this year, there will be a retirement bill that gets sent to the president’s desk.”

A provision that would have allowed money from tax-advantaged 529 education savings plans to be used for home-schooling expenses was stripped from the Secure Act during a House Rules Committee vote earlier this week.

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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#405

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Wed May 29, 2019 10:10 am

Pain psychologists, who knew?

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog ... ments-work
How Pain Psychology Treatments Work
Five fundamental treatment goals of a pain psychologist


Only a small percentage of people living with chronic pain pursue help from a pain psychologist. On one hand, this is discouraging because pain psychology treatments have decades of scientific support for their benefits. Despite these proven benefits, however, mere thousands each year participate in pain psychology therapies among the millions struggling with chronic pain conditions.

On the other hand, it makes sense why few people think about a psychologist when considering treatment options for their chronic pain: most people believe that chronic pain is a medical condition, after all, and medical conditions require medical treatment. In the same way that it seems illogical for a person suffering from panic attacks to seek out a surgeon or a dentist, it seems equally illogical to most people with chronic pain to seek out a psychologist.

The most basic way that pain psychologists help is by showing people how to replace acute pain coping behaviors with chronic pain coping behaviors. All pain begins as acute pain; pain becomes chronic only when it persists past the expected length of time for healing to occur. We react instinctively to acute pain by avoiding painful activities, resting the painful area, seeking medical attention, and waiting for the pain symptoms to subside. These behaviors are both appropriate and effective…for acute pain. When the same pain becomes chronic, however, we need a new set of coping behaviors. Acute pain behaviors such as continued rest, activity avoidance and seeking medical care no longer help and often even worsen the disability associated with chronic pain. When you appreciate that managing chronic pain involves not only learning new chronic pain coping skills but also having to unlearn years of acute pain coping skills, then it makes more sense why a person might benefit from seeing a pain psychologist.
“A black woman can invent something for the benefit of humankind.” -Bessie Blount-Griffin, physical therapist, inventor of devices for disabled WWII veterans, and forensic scientist.

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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#406

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Thu May 30, 2019 11:02 am

News for fibromyalgia sufferers and their kin:

https://health.usnews.com/health-care/p ... bromyalgia

Antiviral or Antiretroviral Drugs for Fibromyalgia?
Exercise and self-care are still the frontline treatments for this chronic pain condition.


Fibromyalgia is a disorder of how the brain processes pain signals that causes symptoms such as fatigue, insomnia, digestive problems, migraines and cognitive issues, and it can be challenging to diagnose and treat. But there are some approaches and medications that have been proven useful.

Why Might Antiviral Agents Help With Fibromyalgia?
Often, fibromyalgia occurs after some sort of triggering event, and in a small cohort of people, it’s believed that this triggering event could be related to contraction of a viral disease, such as Epstein-Barr, the virus that causes mononucleosis. The theory goes that if you can knock out that triggering virus, the symptoms of fibromyalgia will go away, but it’s anything but settled science.

Although research is ongoing into whether antiviral or antiretroviral therapies might someday have wider applications in the treatment of fibromyalgia, Dr. David Trock, a rheumatologist at Danbury Hospital in Connecticut, says “my instincts tell me it’s not going to be an answer for this. The inciting factors that cause fibromyalgia are usually not viral. There may be a post-infectious fibromyalgia phenomena sometimes, for example in people who have the Epstein-Barr virus, and people with HIV probably have a little more fibromyalgia than the average population. But if you give an antiviral therapy to a patient who has something like mono or chronic fatigue syndrome, their fibromyalgia symptoms don’t necessarily improve.” In some cases, the symptoms might actually worsen, he says. “In fact, if you use interferon-like drugs (a form of antiviral therapy), these patients feel more tired and achy as a rule.”

We don’t know the entire reason why exercise is helpful in alleviating pain, but it is considered the No. 1 frontline approach to treating fibromyalgia for several reasons,” Hackshaw says. “One is that many – not all, but many – patients with fibromyalgia are relatively sedentary, so increasing their muscle mass can help to increase their pain threshold. And since fibromyalgia is characterized by relatively innocuous pressure causing pain, increasing the pain threshold can perhaps minimize that type of reaction.” In addition, fibromyalgia features fatigue as a primary symptom, so “anything we can do to build up an individual’s endurance can also help with pain,” he says.
“A black woman can invent something for the benefit of humankind.” -Bessie Blount-Griffin, physical therapist, inventor of devices for disabled WWII veterans, and forensic scientist.

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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#407

Post by Addie » Tue Jun 11, 2019 3:57 pm

The Hill: Researchers say they've made progress toward preventing Alzheimer's

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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#408

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Mon Jun 24, 2019 9:17 am

New study on fibromyalgia.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/325535.php
People with fibromyalgia have different gut bacteria

Researchers in Canada identified 19 species of gut bacteria that were present in higher or lower numbers in individuals with fibromyalgia.

"We found," says Amir Minerbi, of the Alan Edwards Pain Management Unit at McGill University in Montreal, "that fibromyalgia and the symptoms of fibromyalgia — pain, fatigue, and cognitive difficulties — contribute more than any of the other factors to the variations we see in the microbiomes of those with the disease."

We also saw," Minerbi adds, "that the severity of a patient's symptoms was directly correlated with an increased presence or a more pronounced absence of certain bacteria — something which has never been reported before."

The team is keen to point out that the findings do not show whether the changes in gut bacteria are just markers of the disease or actually contribute to or cause its development.
“A black woman can invent something for the benefit of humankind.” -Bessie Blount-Griffin, physical therapist, inventor of devices for disabled WWII veterans, and forensic scientist.

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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#409

Post by Addie » Sat Jul 20, 2019 8:27 am

MBG Health (Podcast): Two Doctors Share Their Science-Backed Secrets To Aging Gracefully

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