China

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Addie
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Re: China

#26

Post by Addie » Thu Jan 26, 2017 3:18 pm

Foreign Policy
Trump’s China Policy: ‘This Is How You Stumble Into a Crisis’ ...

The Trump administration’s muddled and provocative statements about U.S. policy toward China, especially in the contested waters of the South China Sea, have confused allies and aggravated tensions with Beijing, heightening the prospects of a great power conflict.

Rex Tillerson, Trump’s pick for secretary of state, stunned lawmakers and foreign governments at his Jan. 11 Senate confirmation hearing when he said that the United States would be ready to block China’s access to artificial islands it is building in the South China Sea. Seemingly just a gaffe, the White House later appeared to double down on Tillerson’s stance, which taken at face value would be tantamount to an act of war.

The comments suggest President Donald Trump’s White House is eager to take an aggressive tone with Beijing, but lacks a coherent strategy to deal with China or a basic grasp of the legal and security issues at stake in the South China Sea, said former officials, diplomats, Asia experts and congressional aides.

“The U.S. looks somewhere between confrontational and disoriented on the South China Sea,” said Evan Medeiros, who served as the top advisor on Asia in Barack Obama’s White House. “This is how you can stumble into a crisis.” ...

Taken literally, Tillerson’s proposed approach would violate international law and require a naval blockade, which would be an act of war, experts said.

After the hearing, lawmakers on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee gave Tillerson a chance to clarify what they assumed was an ill-informed gaffe, but neither he nor the White House took up the offer, aides told Foreign Policy.


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Re: China

#27

Post by Somerset » Sat Jan 28, 2017 7:54 pm

kate520 wrote:
Somerset wrote:
kate520 wrote:Oh, dear, SusieC. Cooler heads will prevail, I hope. :bighug:

We have a treasured member and family temporarily living in Shanghai. I wonder how this will affect them?
One in Shenzhen too :-)

And I work for a large Chinese company
Two valued members.

Have you been there all along? Are you feeling fallout?

Holy wow. Crazy Uncle Donny is scaring the world!
I moved to Shenzhen in April.

I haven't felt much fallout. We have been talking about opening a new R&D Center in the US (we already have small facilities in San Jose and Dallas), and I think those plans are progressing a little slower now as we watch and see what actions happen. So far, the only real action was the appointment of a very good Ambassador to China, so tough talk and rhetoric aren't being given too much weight just yet.

I suspect that Mr 520's Chinese supplier is taking advantage of a perceived situation and using to jack up prices. There's no real reason justify that big of an increase. The RMB-USD rate has moved ~5% since the election, but that's it. I'd suggest finding another supplier ;)



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Re: China

#28

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Feb 02, 2017 7:37 pm

Trump family send new year greetings to China
February 1, Ivanka Trump with her daughter to the Chinese Embassy in Washington, to congratulate the Chinese New Year.

Ivanka also watched Chinese traditional music with Chinese ambassador Cui Tiankai. Daughter Arabella although a bit shy, but after receiving the rabbit paper-cut or use the Chinese clearly said "thank you."

[liveleak]0ed0902586ce[/liveleak]



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Re: China

#29

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Feb 10, 2017 9:03 am

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AkpR5Wq18lk



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Re: China

#30

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Mar 15, 2017 9:19 am

China’s Premier, Li Keqiang, Strikes Upbeat Tone Amid U.S. Tensions

By CHRIS BUCKLEY and KEITH BRADSHER MARCH 15, 2017

BEIJING — China’s premier, Li Keqiang, defended his government on Wednesday as a bulwark of economic and regional stability, arguing that smoldering tensions with the Trump administration over trade imbalances, North Korea and other disputes in Asia could be solved through dialogue.

The comments appeared intended to set an upbeat tone for a first meeting between President Trump and his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, that is provisionally scheduled for next month at Mr. Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida. In an annual news conference that lasted more than two hours, Mr. Li stressed his optimism about relations with the United States.

“This relationship is crucial for not just China and the United States, but also for regional and global peace, security and stability, and we have to protect its progress,” Mr. Li told hundreds of reporters at the end of the annual meeting of China’s legislature, the National People’s Congress.

Mr. Li’s comments, under giant chandeliers in the lavish Golden Hall at the Great Hall of the People on Tiananmen Square, showed how quickly the outward mood in relations had shifted. Before and after his election victory in November, Mr. Trump threw down a series of challenges that rattled policy makers in Beijing.
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/15/worl ... rence.html



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Re: China

#31

Post by Skip Intro » Sun Mar 19, 2017 7:38 pm

Image


In the Trump era anything is true if enough people believe it.

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Re: China

#32

Post by Volkonski » Wed Apr 05, 2017 3:02 pm

How Trump Can Solve His Chinese Puzzle

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/05/opin ... uzzle.html
China is now the world’s largest manufacturer, largest exporter and largest market for vehicles, smartphones and oil. In 2014, the International Monetary Fund announced that China had become the largest economy in the world, measured by purchasing power. By then, China had also become the biggest export market for 43 countries in the world; the United States was the biggest market for just 32 countries. And this year,Germany announced that China is now its largest trading partner.

This shift of economic power, a process I call “Easternization,” has increased China’s geopolitical clout. All of America’s most important partners in the Asia-Pacific region, including Japan, Australia and South Korea, still look to the United States for protection. But their most important economic relationships are all now with China. That gives Beijing real leverage, which Mr. Xi’s government is increasingly prepared to use.

Some traditional American allies show signs of defecting. During a visit to Beijing last year, the president of the Philippines, Rodrigo Duterte, announced a “separation” from the United States and a new relationship with China. Filipino officials cite Chinese loans, infrastructure investment and fruit imports to explain why their country has modulated its criticism of Beijing’s maritime claims in the South China Sea. As the defense minister said this week, “any product that we produce, they will buy.”

China is also more prepared to use economic and diplomatic threats against American allies. To put pressure on Seoul not to cooperate with the deployment of an American antimissile shield, Beijing recently canceled contracts with prominent South Korean companies.
Trump should reconsider the Trans Pacific Partnership. ;)


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Re: China

#33

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Apr 06, 2017 8:57 am

Volkonski wrote:How Trump Can Solve His Chinese Puzzle

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/05/opin ... uzzle.html
NYT wrote:In his meeting with Mr. Xi this week, Mr. Trump needs to send a carefully balanced message — not easy for a president who doesn’t do nuance — to reassure America’s Asian allies that it will stand by them, and stand up to China without taking reckless steps. If the president fails to offer such reassurance, America’s position in Asia will continue to erode.



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Re: China

#34

Post by Volkonski » Fri Apr 07, 2017 4:45 pm

Trump seems to have played nice with Xi during the summit which was all but overshadowed by the Syria missile strike. Trump is not living up to a lot of his campaign rhetoric. Many of his supporters will not be pleased. ;)


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Re: China

#35

Post by Sam the Centipede » Fri Apr 07, 2017 4:58 pm

Volkonski wrote:Trump seems to have played nice with Xi during the summit which was all but overshadowed by the Syria missile strike. Trump is not living up to a lot of his campaign rhetoric. Many of his supporters will not be pleased. ;)
Yabbut many (most?) of his supporters are completd f...ing morons who wouldn't even know that Syria isn't a neighbor of China.



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Re: China

#36

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Apr 07, 2017 7:12 pm

Sam the Centipede wrote:
Volkonski wrote:Trump seems to have played nice with Xi during the summit which was all but overshadowed by the Syria missile strike. Trump is not living up to a lot of his campaign rhetoric. Many of his supporters will not be pleased. ;)
Yabbut many (most?) of his supporters are completd f...ing morons who wouldn't even know that Syria isn't a neighbor of China.
What, Syria is not a province of North Korea :?:

:twisted: :lol:



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Re: China

#37

Post by NotaPerson » Sun Apr 09, 2017 5:15 pm

Maybe Trump has handed off the "tough guy" duties to Ross when it comes to China....

Wilbur Ross says U.S. wants ‘tangible results’ with China — and soon
In last week’s meeting between top Chinese officials and the new Trump administration, “we made very clear that our primary objectives are twofold,” Ross said Sunday during an interview on Fox News. “One is to reduce the trade deficit quite noticeably between the United States and China, and two, to increase total trade between the two.”

Ross said the meeting between the American and Chinese leaders went well, but “words are easy, discussions are easy, endless meetings are easy. What’s hard is tangible results, and if we don’t get some tangible results within the first 100 days, I think we’ll have to re-examine whether it’s worthwhile continuing them.”
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/wilbur ... eid=YAHOOB

:smoking:


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Re: China

#38

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Apr 09, 2017 8:38 pm

NotaPerson wrote:Maybe Trump has handed off the "tough guy" duties to Ross when it comes to China....

Wilbur Ross says U.S. wants ‘tangible results’ with China — and soon

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/wilbur ... eid=YAHOOB
marketwatch wrote:In last week’s meeting between top Chinese officials and the new Trump administration, “we made very clear that our primary objectives are twofold,” Ross said Sunday during an interview on Fox News. “One is to reduce the trade deficit quite noticeably between the United States and China, and two, to increase total trade between the two.”
This would mean that the US wants to extend its trade with China. Exporters, if you have not learned Spanish, now it^s high noon to learn Mandarin and read The Art Of The Deal (Chinese Edition).
marketwatch wrote:Ross said the meeting between the American and Chinese leaders went well, but “words are easy, discussions are easy, endless meetings are easy. What’s hard is tangible results, and if we don’t get some tangible results within the first 100 days, I think we’ll have to re-examine whether it’s worthwhile continuing them.”
"The Ugly American" speaking in Willbur Ross: please learn that Asia works on a very different time scale! Forget those 100 days as a framework for tangible results. Those 100 days may be ok for you to identify your own products with potential for export to the Chinese market. But then you have to find your trade partner. Time to set up a Trade Congress in Peking (the government there will assist you) so that Chinese business people can take a sneak preview of your offers. Don't forget to present yourself fluent in Chinese, spoken and written. Follow up with a Trade Congress on American soil and invite your new contacts to the US. Don't forget to handle visas in a timely manner, best forget your intents on extreme vetting.



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Re: China

#39

Post by TollandRCR » Sun Apr 09, 2017 9:02 pm

Many Americans and Europeans do not realize how recent their acquisition of wealth has been. Before 1492, most of the world's wealth (and most of its people) were in South and East Asia. Europe was this little appendage to the great Asian powers.

Nobody there knew that there was an experiment being conducted with great civilizations arising in the Americas in segregation from Eurasia. No horses, cattle, oxen, etc., but just one ornery beast of burden, the llama and its cousins. They knew about the axle and wheel but used them only in children's toys, having nothing to hitch a cart to except humans.

Trump and his crew are assuming that the Chinese are willing to deal. They somehow assume that we have an upper hand. I think that is unlikely. This means that we must become very much more innovative and productive to keep the Chinese as our customers.


“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

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Re: China

#40

Post by Somerset » Sun Apr 09, 2017 9:40 pm

Actually, things can move surprisingly fast in China. If the government wants something done and it's possible to do it, it gets done. I expect we'll see changes in tarrifs fairly quickly.

I agree that Wilbur Ross is being an ugly American, and may well find himself sidelined in Chinese relations. Many American companies are doing well here, having learned exactly the same lessons you mention. Apple, Cadillac, Budweiser, Nike and many others​ have learned how to position their brands in the Chinese market, and will benefit from lowered trade barriers.



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Re: China

#41

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Apr 11, 2017 6:23 pm

re Actually, things can move surprisingly fast in China.
China 'deploys 150,000 troops to deal with possible North Korean refugees over fears Trump may strike Kim Jong-un following missile attack on Syria'
  • Trump's Syria strike Friday was widely interpreted as a warning to North Korea
  • China, which was left shocked by the air strikes, has deployed medical and backup units from the People's Liberation Army forces to the Yalu River
  • The troops have been dispatched to prepare for pre-emptive attacks by the US
  • The US Navy has moved the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier strike group from Singapore to North Korea after the country conducted more missile testing
By Kelly Mclaughlin For Mailonline and Reuters
PUBLISHED: 19:24 BST, 10 April 2017 | UPDATED: 23:12 BST, 10 April 2017

The Chinese army has reportedly deployed 150,000 troops to the North Korean border to prepare for pre-emptive attacks after the United States dropped airstrikes on Syria.

President Donald Trump's missile strike on Syria on Friday was widely interpreted as a warning to North Korea.

And now China, left shocked by the air strikes, has deployed medical and backup units from the People's Liberation Army forces to the Yalu River, Korea's Chosun.com reported.

The troops have been dispatched to handle North Korean refugees and 'unforeseen circumstances', such as the prospect of preemptive attacks on North Korea, the news agency said.

Meanwhile, the US Navy has moved the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier strike group from Singapore to North Korea after the country conducted more missile testing.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... order.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5nNZfSSj2IE



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Re: China

#42

Post by TollandRCR » Tue Apr 11, 2017 7:36 pm

I'll make another post that will not be favorably received by everyone.

Let's say that we have a choice between (1) dropping a few missiles on known missile and nuclear sites and (2) assassinating Kim Jong Un. I know that domestic law forbids option (2). I also suspect that there might be worse actors hiding behind Kim. But we did a good thing to kill Osama bin Laden. Maybe we could at least discombobulate the North Korean leadership for a while if we take out the insane dictator now in place. He is a grave danger to his own people as well as to the world.

I think of Count Claus von Stauffenberg who led one of the eight failed plots against Hitler. Had one succeeded, would the world have been spared some of that lunatic's horrors? Stauffenberg did not try until July 1944. However, lots of people on all sides were still to die or be ruined. The Battle of the Bulge was still to come. "According to the U.S. Department of Defense, American forces suffered 89,500 casualties including 19,000 killed, 47,500 wounded and 23,000 missing. The Battle of the Bulge was the bloodiest battle for U.S. forces in World War II. British casualties totaled 1,400 with 200 deaths. The German Armed Forces High Command's official figure for all German losses on the Western Front during the period 16 December 1944 – 25 January 1945 was 81,834 German casualties, and other estimates range between 60,000 and 125,000." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of ... Casualties

Saving even one life on either side would justify assassination to me.


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Re: China

#43

Post by maydijo » Tue Apr 11, 2017 7:38 pm

I'm not convinced that the people behind the power aren't just as dangerous as the person who has the power. You assassinate Kim, who steps in to fill the void?



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Re: China

#44

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Apr 11, 2017 8:08 pm

TollandRCR wrote:I'll make another post that will not be favorably received by everyone.

Let's say that we have a choice between (1) dropping a few missiles on known missile and nuclear sites and (2) assassinating Kim Jong Un. I know that domestic law forbids option (2). I also suspect that there might be worse actors hiding behind Kim. But we did a good thing to kill Osama bin Laden. Maybe we could at least discombobulate the North Korean leadership for a while if we take out the insane dictator now in place. He is a grave danger to his own people as well as to the world.

I think of Count Claus von Stauffenberg who led one of the eight failed plots against Hitler. Had one succeeded, would the world have been spared some of that lunatic's horrors? Stauffenberg did not try until July 1944. However, lots of people on all sides were still to die or be ruined. The Battle of the Bulge was still to come. "According to the U.S. Department of Defense, American forces suffered 89,500 casualties including 19,000 killed, 47,500 wounded and 23,000 missing. The Battle of the Bulge was the bloodiest battle for U.S. forces in World War II. British casualties totaled 1,400 with 200 deaths. The German Armed Forces High Command's official figure for all German losses on the Western Front during the period 16 December 1944 – 25 January 1945 was 81,834 German casualties, and other estimates range between 60,000 and 125,000." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of ... Casualties


Saving even one life on either side would justify assassination to me.
As I see things, the problem with forcibly sending Dear Leader prematurely to join papa and grandpa is that no one knows much about the internal power structure that keeps N.K. running. Will it just implode as East Germany did and the USSR evaporated? Or will some second or third in command take the reigns and run a similar desastrous regieme (they essentially have only been trained to recognize their one sided world view). If the game continues, one can expect some special nasty infighting over power. Not to forget that one guy may feel threatened and think its the other guy from the South that are playing dirty and then triggers a war "as planned" all out against S.K., more likely only conventional without nukes.



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Re: China

#45

Post by Somerset » Tue Apr 11, 2017 8:40 pm

I agree with Tollie, and have thought the same thing myself. Yes, there are likely other bad people, and sometimes it's better to stick with"the devil you know." But in this case, none of the other devils have the power of the dynasty. Breaking the dynasty could have bad consequences, but it is also one of the few ways the DPRK could reform itself into something that works and plays well with others.



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Re: China

#46

Post by Somerset » Tue Apr 11, 2017 8:43 pm

On a happier note, this week's edition of The Economist has a great section on the Pearl River Delta. If you can get a copy the reports have some great insight into the economy and life here.



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Re: China

#47

Post by Volkonski » Wed Apr 12, 2017 10:58 am

Somerset wrote:I agree with Tollie, and have thought the same thing myself. Yes, there are likely other bad people, and sometimes it's better to stick with"the devil you know." But in this case, none of the other devils have the power of the dynasty. Breaking the dynasty could have bad consequences, but it is also one of the few ways the DPRK could reform itself into something that works and plays well with others.
Might not such an action normalize political assassination as a tool of government policy? Then there might be a series of assassinations by various governments against the leaders of other governments.


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Re: China

#48

Post by Somerset » Wed Apr 12, 2017 11:25 am

Somerset wrote:On a happier note, this week's edition of The Economist has a great section on the Pearl River Delta. If you can get a copy the reports have some great insight into the economy and life here.

https://www.economist.com/news/special- ... innovation
Huawei spends more on R&D than Apple does. The privately held Shenzhen firm made its name as a telecoms-equipment vendor, but is now a big force in smartphones and cloud computing too. Its revenues for 2016 are estimated at 520bn yuan, a 32% increase on a year earlier. It devotes an impressive 15% of its revenues and 82,000 of its 180,000 employees to R&D.

Huawei is innovating as it is globalising. Dieter Ernst of the East-West Centre, an American think-tank, praises the company for creating a “global innovation network” of the sort that only Western multinational companies used to have, with more than two dozen R&D centres the world over and a number of collaborative hubs run with leading multinationals and universities.

This has paid dividends. Huawei is one of the world’s most prolific generators of high-quality international patents. Along with Sweden’s Ericsson it is at the forefront of 5G, which will replace the current 4G networks for mobile telephony. Its narrow-band internet-of-things protocol, a cheap and low-energy way to connect machines to the cloud, was recently approved as a global standard.

.......

Mr Li says the already frenetic pace of Chinese innovation is speeding up further. Dealmaking used to involve long banquets and vast quantities of baijiu, a local firewater. Now introductions are made at the flick of a finger on WeChat, a remarkable messaging and payments app with more than 800m users. As soon as a WeChat group is formed, there is little need for phone calls or meetings. Tencent, the internet and online-gaming giant that invented WeChat, is also based in Shenzhen. Worth some $250bn, it is one of Asia’s most valuable firms. Its snazzy and green new headquarters in Nanshan towers over a modern neighbourhood of startups, incubators and funky coffee shops.



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Re: China

#49

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Apr 12, 2017 4:43 pm

Somerset wrote:
Somerset wrote:On a happier note, this week's edition of The Economist has a great section on the Pearl River Delta. If you can get a copy the reports have some great insight into the economy and life here.

https://www.economist.com/news/special- ... innovation
:snippity:
Mr Li says the already frenetic pace of Chinese innovation is speeding up further. Dealmaking used to involve long banquets and vast quantities of baijiu, a local firewater. Now introductions are made at the flick of a finger on WeChat, a remarkable messaging and payments appwith more than 800m users. As soon as a WeChat group is formed, there is little need for phone calls or meetings. Tencent, the internet and online-gaming giant that invented WeChat, is also based in Shenzhen. Worth some $250bn, it is one of Asia’s most valuable firms. Its snazzy and green new headquarters in Nanshan towers over a modern neighbourhood of startups, incubators and funky coffee shops.
Don't let scrotus hear about it, he will stop twittering :lol: :lol: :lol:



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Re: China

#50

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Apr 12, 2017 6:34 pm

non-political (?)

China in Antartica

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LLISWya7JFw



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