Spy Games

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 26492
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Spy Games

#1

Post by Addie » Mon Jan 26, 2015 3:36 pm

Business Insider







FBI: We Found Three Russian Spies In New York City





The FBI announced on Monday that it had busted a Russian spy ring.



According to a federal complaint filed by FBI special agent Gregory Monaghan in a Manhattan federal court on Friday, an alleged spy, Evgeny Buryakov, posed as a banker in the New York office of an unnamed Russian bank.



Buryakov is reportedly being arraigned in the Southern District of New York.



Monaghan said Buryakov (a.k.a. "Zhenya") was actually on "deep cover" and working for Russia's Foreign Intelligence Service to gather intelligence and transmit it back to Moscow. ...



The US and Russia have experienced a number of spying spats over the years. In 2013, Russia expelled an American suspected of being a CIA agent trying to recruit intelligence officers in Moscow. In an even more prominent 2010 incident, the US arrested 10 alleged Russian spies, including Anna Chapman, the "femme fatale" who was subsequently released as part of a prisoner swap with Russia.








¡Estiveo! come home.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 26492
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Spy Games

#2

Post by Addie » Tue Jan 27, 2015 9:14 am

Reuters











Inquiry into London killing of ex-KGB spy Litvinenko begins





(Reuters) - A long-awaited public inquiry into the death of Alexander Litvinenko began in London on Tuesday, nine years after the former KGB spy died after drinking tea poisoned with a rare radioactive isotope in the British capital.



From his deathbed, Kremlin-critic Litvinenko, who had been granted British citizenship, accused Russian President Vladimir Putin of ordering his murder and British authorities say there is evidence to charge two ex-KGB agents with murder.



Russia has always denied any involvement in his death. ...



British police believe Litvinenko was poisoned with tea laced with the rare isotope polonium-210 at the Pine Bar of the Millennium hotel in central London in November 2006 where he was meeting former Russian spies, Andrei Lugovoy and Dmitry Kovtun. ...



Litvinenko's wife Marina has said she believes the inquiry will finally shed light on how her husband died, as well as on his work for the British foreign spy agency MI6.








¡Estiveo! come home.

User avatar
Kriselda Gray
Posts: 8645
Joined: Fri Aug 14, 2009 4:17 am
Location: FEMA Camp 2112 - a joint project of the U.S. and Canada
Contact:

Spy Games

#3

Post by Kriselda Gray » Tue Jan 27, 2015 9:18 am

interesting - I'm kind of s surprised they're looking into it after all this time. I wonder what changed to make it ok to investigate now rather than earlier...


Ignorance and prejudice and fear walk hand in hand... - "Witch Hunt" by Rush

SCMP = SovCits/Militias/Patriots.

Thor promised to slay the Ice Giants
God promised to quell all evil
-----
I'm not seeing any Ice Giants...

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 26492
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Spy Games

#4

Post by Addie » Tue Jan 27, 2015 9:21 am

Irish Times











Polonium found across London at time of Litvinenko death





Thousands of people were put at risk from radioactivity when Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko was poisoned, a public inquiry has heard.



Counsel to the inquiry Robin Tam QC told the inquiry traces of radioactive chemical polonium were found across London at the time of Mr Litvinenko’s death. ...



Mr Tam said a public health alert was issued around the time of Mr Litvinenko’s death when traces of polonium were found in “large numbers of places across London”

.

“Many thousands of members of the public, including British residents and visitors from overseas, might have been at risk from radioactivity,” Mr Tam said.










¡Estiveo! come home.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 26492
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Spy Games

#5

Post by Addie » Tue Jan 27, 2015 9:23 am

Because the Brits were still cozying up to the Russians then, I suppose.







interesting - I'm kind of s surprised they're looking into it after all this time. I wonder what changed to make it ok to investigate now rather than earlier...





¡Estiveo! come home.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 26492
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Spy Games

#6

Post by Addie » Wed Jan 28, 2015 9:10 am

BBC News









Litvinenko 'poisoned by Russian mafia state,' family's lawyer claims



Ex-Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko was murdered for trying to "expose the corruption" at the heart of Vladimir Putin's "mafia state", the public inquiry into his death has heard.



His poisoning with polonium was an "act of nuclear terrorism on streets of a major city", said Ben Emmerson QC, the barrister representing his family. ...



In his opening statement on the first day of the inquiry, Mr Emmerson said Mr Litvinenko was "eliminated" because he had made an enemy of the "close knit group of criminals who surrounded and still surround Vladimir Putin and keep his corrupt regime in power". ...



Sir Robert Owen said sensitive evidence had established a "prima facie case" as to the culpability of the Russian state ...



Sir Robert was originally appointed as the coroner at Mr Litvinenko's inquest but he called for a public inquiry because the inquest could not consider sensitive evidence due to national security fears.





¡Estiveo! come home.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 26492
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Spy Games

#7

Post by Addie » Sat Jan 31, 2015 9:16 am

WaPo











CIA and Mossad killed senior Hezbollah figure in car bombing





On Feb. 12, 2008, Imad Mughniyah, Hezbollah’s international operations chief, walked on a quiet nighttime street in Damascus after dinner at a nearby restaurant. Not far away, a team of CIA spotters in the Syrian capital was tracking his movements.



As Mughniyah approached a parked SUV, a bomb planted in a spare tire on the back of the vehicle exploded, sending a burst of shrapnel across a tight radius. He was killed instantly.



The device was triggered remotely from Tel Aviv by agents with Mossad, the Israeli foreign intelligence service, who were in communication with the operatives on the ground in Damascus. “The way it was set up, the U.S. could object and call it off, but it could not execute,” said a former U.S. intelligence official. ...



The United States has never acknowledged participation in the killing of Mughniyah, which Hezbollah blamed on Israel. Until now, there has been little detail about the joint operation by the CIA and Mossad to kill him, how the car bombing was planned or the exact U.S. role. With the exception of the 2011 killing of Osama bin Laden, the mission marked one of the most high-risk covert actions by the United States in recent years.








¡Estiveo! come home.

User avatar
Dolly
Posts: 11968
Joined: Fri Dec 07, 2012 7:32 pm

Spy Games

#8

Post by Dolly » Sat Jan 31, 2015 9:17 pm

Litvinenko autopsy was world's most dangerous, UK inquiry hears

(Reuters) - Pathologists examining the body of ex-KGB spy Alexander Litvinenko, poisoned with a rare radioactive isotope nine years ago in London, carried out the world's most dangerous-ever autopsy on his body, an inquiry into his killing heard on Wednesday.

They also said they would probably never have discovered the way he had died had unusual tests not been carried out just before his death.

.............

The inquiry was told "an inspired hunch" by police led them to bring in atomic scientists who found Litvinenko tested positive for alpha radiation poisoning two days before he died.

Lead pathologist Nat Cary said without that, the cause of death would not have been discovered in a post-mortem, adding he was unaware of any other case of someone being poisoned with alpha radiation in Britain, and probably the world.

............

The controversy generated by Litvinenko's killing plunged Anglo-Russian relations to a post-Cold War low.

As ties improved though, Britain rejected holding an inquiry in 2013, but then, as the Ukraine crisis unfolded, the government changed its mind last July although it said the political Ukrainian situation was not a factor.

...........







http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/01/ ... LU20150128



Radioactivity hazard at Alexander Litvinenko autopsy cited

.............

Litvinenko, a former KGB agent turned Kremlin critic, fell violently ill on Nov. 1, 2006, after drinking tea with two Russian men at a London hotel, and spent three weeks in a London hospital before he died.

On his deathbed, Litvinenko accused President Vladimir Putin of ordering his assassination, and Britain has also alleged that the Russian state was involved.

Cary said the cause of death would likely have remained a mystery were it not for a urine test conducted by a doctor, on a hunch, shortly before Litvinenko died.







http://www.bostonglobe.com/news/world/2 ... story.html



Litvinenko post-mortem 'probably most dangerous ever'

.............

The Litvinenko case

23 Nov 2006 - Mr Litvinenko, 43, dies three weeks after having tea with former agents Andrei Lugovoi and Dmitry Kovtun in London

24 Nov 2006 - His death is attributed to polonium-210

22 May 2007 - Britain's director of public prosecutions decides Mr Lugovoi should be charged with the murder of Mr Litvinenko

31 May 2007 - Mr Lugovoi denies any involvement in his death but says Mr Litvinenko was a British spy

<SNIPPED the remaining dates>










Avatar by Tal Peleg Art of Makeup https://www.facebook.com/TalPelegMakeUp

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 26492
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Spy Games

#9

Post by Addie » Mon Feb 02, 2015 1:37 pm

BBC News









Alexander Litvinenko was 'a paid consultant' for MI6





At the inquiry into the Russian ex-spy's death, Mrs Litvinenko revealed her husband acted as a "consultant" to a British intelligence service.



She could not confirm which agency but the BBC understands it was MI6.



The court also heard that Mr Litvinenko believed Vladimir Putin had links to organised crime in his earlier career.



Mr Litvinenko came into contact with the now-Russian president in 1998 when Putin was head of the FSB, Russia's secret service.

Mrs Litvinenko told the inquiry: "On his position of deputy mayor of St Petersburg, Sasha [Alexander Litvinenko] believed he [Putin] was involved in some criminal conduct."








¡Estiveo! come home.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 26492
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Spy Games

#10

Post by Addie » Sun Feb 15, 2015 9:18 am

Telegraph











Wanted: Russian-speaking spies to help MI5 keep tabs on Vladimir Putin





It is over 20 years since the Berlin Wall fell, the Cold War ended and Britain’s spooks were recalled from behind the Iron Curtain.







But now UK security services are recruiting a new generation of Russian-speaking spies to help monitor Vladimir Putin's undercover agents as relations worsen once again.







Applicants should be British, bright and discreet enough not to tweet the good news if successful, according to an online advert for the intelligence agencies. ...





With positions at MI5, MI6 and GCHQ all on the cards and a potential salary of £30,000 there is unlikely to be a shortage of applicants before the 26 March deadline.



But the sudden drive to employ new Russian experts has raised questions about whether our intelligence agencies have been to slow to react to an apparent surge in espionage from the East.








¡Estiveo! come home.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 26492
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Spy Games

#11

Post by Addie » Wed Mar 04, 2015 9:24 am

The Star













Spies expelled to the U.S. were not American citizens







OTTAWA—A report that five spies were thrown out of Canada and sent back to the U.S. ruffled diplomatic feathers Tuesday, prompting Public Safety Minister Steven Blaney to confirm that the individuals were not American agents.







“All five of the suspected spies deported from Canada to the United States were cases of Canada returning to the United States someone who was suspected of spying against the United States,” said Blaney’s communications director Jean-Christophe de Le Rue. ...







The release of the previously undisclosed statistics compiled by the Canada Border Services Agency — and provided to the newspapers under the Access to Information law — led to speculation that Americans were spying on their northern neighbours. ...





Earlier Tuesday, government sources who spoke on the condition they not be named, sought to clarify the report and told the Star that these individuals expelled from 2004 to 2014 were foreign nationals who travelled to Canada through the U.S. and were deported back to the U.S., their last point of entry.







The sources declined to specify the citizenship of those ordered out. However, it was suggested they were agents of foreign intelligence gathering services who did not have Ottawa’s consent to conduct operations on Canadian soil.














¡Estiveo! come home.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 26492
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Spy Games

#12

Post by Addie » Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:22 pm

When were they not?



Express











MI6 chiefs warn British agents they are being targeted by Russian spies in the UK





Bosses of the UK's secret services believe MI6 staff and their families are at risk of blackmail as agents working for Russian President Vladimir Putin seek new ways to access highly-classified information.



The memo, seen by the Daily Star Sunday, suggests Russian spies are attempting to turn members of the Secret Intelligence Service into double agents.



It adds that retired members of MI6 could also be on Mr Putin’s hit-list, describing British agents as “high priority targets”.



The problem is considered to pose such a real and present threat to UK security that intelligence service bosses have urged staff to call an emergency number any time they are approached by foreign agents.








¡Estiveo! come home.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 26492
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Spy Games

#13

Post by Addie » Fri Jun 05, 2015 8:32 am



Independenthttp://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/the ... 80.htmlThe New Spymasters book reveals the truth about espionage in the countryAt Fort Monckton, the secret service training base just outside Gosport, Hampshire, new recruits to Britain’s Secret Intelligence Service (SIS) still get taught the art of pistol shooting by retired sergeant-majors.The chances are, however, is that they will never get to use this skill, because the world of spying is almost nothing like its popular portrayal. ...I have been trying examine the remarkable changes affecting the craft of espionage since the days after the Cold War, against new enemies such as al-Qaeda and Isis and amid a technological revolution.  But, before understanding anything, I first had to clear up some basic misconceptions. One thing rarely understood about espionage, as it has come to be in the 21st century, has been the shift out of the field and into the office. There aren’t may British Government employees roaming the world with false identities and licences to kill. Rather, increasingly, the desk-jockeys have been hiring people such as “Steak Knife”, Britain’s top spy inside the IRA. Our Government agents are now “spymasters” who recruit or “handle” spies; they are career professionals employed by agencies such as  the CIA and Britain’s SIS (also known by its one-time codename, MI6) or Military Intelligence.Rather than go “undercover” themselves, as Cromie and the spooks in Le Carré and Fleming did, the job of these professionals largely consists of trying to get other people, mostly foreigners and mainly amateurs, to do the espionage for them. So while the perils of spying and betrayal are real, the risks are not shared evenly.  


¡Estiveo! come home.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 26492
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: Spy Games

#14

Post by Addie » Tue Jul 28, 2015 2:56 pm

CNN
Spy for Israel Jonathan Pollard granted parole

(CNN)Convicted spy for Israel Jonathan Pollard has been granted parole and will be released from an American jail on Nov. 21, his lawyer announced Tuesday.

Pollard's release -- exactly 30 years after his arrest -- could help ease the tensions between the United States and Israel that have grown over the Iran nuclear deal, which President Barack Obama supports and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu vehemently opposes.

Both the Justice Department and Pollard's pro bono attorneys, Eliot Lauer and Jacques Semmelman, confirmed his release date Tuesday. ...

Pollard, now 60, worked as a Navy intelligence analyst and passed on top-secret U.S. government information to Israel. Israel's government admitted paying him for the intelligence in 1998. The country granted Pollard citizenship in 1995 and has lobbied for his release for decades.


¡Estiveo! come home.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 26492
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: Spy Games

#15

Post by Addie » Wed Jul 29, 2015 9:59 am

Daily Beast
Why Is the U.S. Releasing Israeli Spy Jonathan Pollard? ...

Pollard never made it to his second anniversary as spy. But what he turned over to the Israelis defied their highest expectations. He later confessed to selling more than 800 classified publications and 1,000 classified messages and cables. Still, he maintained in court and in subsequent years that this caused the U.S. no great harm and was on behalf of a trusted diplomatic and military ally.

Not so, say experts. “The notion that what he did wasn’t very bad because we are an ally of the Israelis is foolishness,” one U.S. counterintelligence official intimately acquainted with the Pollard case told The Daily Beast. “The point of having a security clearance is that you owe your loyalty to one country and one country only. It doesn’t matter what your particular feelings are about Israel. This is a man who was a traitor and who thought that because of his personal views it was permissible to substitute his views for what should be shared with our ally for those of the president or the government in general.”

Spike Bowman also pointed out that Pollard had previously tried to sell information to both Pakistan and South Africa, despite his self-portrayal—and the narrative adopted by his defenders—that he was motivated by an ardent Zionism. “He was scheming any way he could to make money,” Bowman said. “This was his big thing. He just happened to hit upon one that was a well to go to. It was purely mercenary.”

Some of the damage Pollard wrought, Bowman said, still has an impact on U.S. national security in 2015 because the data he disclosed forced organizations such as the NSA to alter their operations and intelligence-gathering mechanism. And that was long before Edward Snowden.


¡Estiveo! come home.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 26492
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: Spy Games

#16

Post by Addie » Wed Jul 29, 2015 2:12 pm

Haaretz
Obama won't alter terms of spy Jonathan Pollard's parole, White House says

President Barack Obama has no intention of altering the terms of Jonathan Pollard's parole, the White House announced on Tuesday night. The announcement indicates that that Pollard, a former U.S. Navy intelligence officer convicted of spying for Israel, will have to remain in the U.S. for five years after his release from prison in November.

The White House further reiterated that Pollard's release has no link to foreign policy considerations.

The U.S. Parole Commission has ruled that Pollard will be released from prison on November 21. Pollard will complete a 30-year sentence despite efforts by successive Israeli governments to secure his early release.


¡Estiveo! come home.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 26492
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: Spy Games

#17

Post by Addie » Fri Jul 31, 2015 12:54 pm

WSJ
Litvinenko Death From Poisoning Inquiry Concludes

LONDON—A monthslong inquiry into the 2006 death from poisoning of former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko concluded Friday after a parade of witnesses provided evidence that British police said “points unwaveringly” at two men working at the behest of the Russian state.

Mr. Litvinenko, who moved to the U.K. in 2000 and became a Kremlin critic, died after consuming tea laced with radioactive polonium at a luxury hotel in Mayfair, London. British officials have long accused two Russians, former KGB agent Andrei Lugovoi and a longtime acquaintance Dmitry Kovtun, of administering the fatal dose when they met with Mr. Litvinenko at the hotel bar. ...

The inquiry also heard new witness testimony from nuclear scientists and forensic experts presented by police related to a radioactive trail left behind by the polonium that marked nearly everywhere the accused assassins visited while in London.

Radioactive contamination was detected in the airplanes, cars, hotels and nightclubs the accused visited, according to the police investigation. Traces were even found in the stadium of Arsenal football club where they attended a soccer match. In the moments before Mr. Litvinenko arrived at the Millennium Hotel for his meeting with Mr. Kovtun and Mr. Lugovoi, the pair retreated to the hotel’s reception lavatory, where high levels of contamination were later found on a cubicle door, the police investigation found.

The radioactive trail ended at the British embassy in Moscow in the room in which the alleged murderers made their declarations, according to the Metropolitan Police, known as Scotland Yard. A chair in the room used by Mr. Kovtun showed particularly high levels of contamination, the police said.


¡Estiveo! come home.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 26492
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: Spy Games

#18

Post by Addie » Fri Jul 31, 2015 1:14 pm

Capitol Hill Seattle
What happened to Capitol Hill ‘conspirators’ in the FBI’s 2010 Russian spy case

The story is something out of a Cold War thriller, with a Capitol Hill twist. Buried cash, “deep cover” spying, “brush passes” at train stations to exchange bags of money, all ending with a U.S.-Russia spy swap on a Vienna airport runway.

Russian intelligence called it the “Illegals program” — an ambitious multiyear spy operation carried out by at least 11 deep cover Russian agents in the U.S. that all came crashing down five years ago this summer. Two of those spies, a married couple with children, lived in Seattle as early as 2004 and left in 2009.

They lived on Capitol Hill.

Known in the U.S. as Michael Zottoli and Patricia Mills, the couple lived relatively quiet lives. He purported to be from Yonkers, New York while she claimed to be Canadian. Their spycraft never drew any suspicion from neighbors or their landlord at 424 Belmont Ave E.

In 2010, after the couple had moved to Virginia, they were arrested as part of a major FBI surveillance investigation into the Russian spy ring. It wasn’t until then that the true identities of Mikhail Kutsik and Natalia Pereverzeva were revealed. FBI agents called them the “Seattle conspirators.”


¡Estiveo! come home.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 26492
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: Spy Games

#19

Post by Addie » Wed Aug 05, 2015 10:11 am

Los Angeles Review of Books
Manchu Princess, Japanese Spy : The Story of Kawashima Yoshiko, the Cross-Dressing Spy Who Commanded Her Own Army

The Uncooperative Facts of an Elusive Life

SOME AMONG HER CONTEMPORARIES called her an Eastern Mata Hari, thereby identifying her as a seductive and exotic spy. Others used the appellation “Joan of Arc of the Orient,” gesturing toward her role as a patriotic heroine. Her admirers termed her a princess, based on her family connection to China’s last emperors. She was born Aisin Gioro Xianyu, the 14th daughter of an aristocratic Manchu family several years before the fall of the Qing, China’s last dynasty, in 1912. Given to a Japanese adventurer taken with the cause of Manchu restoration and raised by him in Japan from early childhood, she became Kawashima Yoshiko, the darling of Japan’s early wartime media. Her antics in male attire, her association with powerful and wealthy lovers, her dramatic public statements, her rumored involvement in military operations in Manchuria (under the nom de guerre Commander Jin), and her aristocratic heritage all contributed to her celebrity and notoriety in 1930s Shanghai, Tokyo, Harbin (Manchuria), and beyond. The subject of a novel and numerous articles in her own lifetime, she has subsequently featured in film, fiction, and biography in multiple languages. Executed by the government of the Republic of China for treason in 1948, she remains an object of fascination, nostalgia, scorn, pity, or condemnation, depending, it seems, on the nationality of the beholder.

Relatively unknown in the West — other than for Maggie Han’s portrayal of her in Bernardo Bertolucci’s 1987 epic The Last Emperor as Eastern Jewel, the tough talking, toe-sucking imperial relation — she remains a notorious traitor in China, and a relatively sympathetic site of war memory for some in Japan. Indeed, her fractured image reflects tensions over historical memory within and between the two countries, revealing much about conflicted regional politics at present, as the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II approaches. Sexually loose and politically compromised, Yoshiko embodies the antithesis of the virtuous female victim of Japanese atrocities familiar from Chinese resistance fiction of the 1930s and 1940s and from patriotic programs broadcast incessantly in more recent years. She is in this regard perfectly suited to the role of Hanjian or traitor to the Han (Chinese) people — the historical villain against which nationalist virtue might today be measured. By contrast, Japanese readers of wartime novels and propaganda through recent consumers of postwar films and fiction and commemorative sites register her as the (almost Japanese) victim of sexual violence, evoking the pathos of those who (innocently and collectively) suffered tumultuous times. She thus offers a fascinating case study of the intersections of gender, sexuality, celebrity, and national identity from World War II through the present.


¡Estiveo! come home.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 26492
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: Spy Games

#20

Post by Addie » Mon Sep 07, 2015 8:38 am

The Telegraph
Sixth member of Cambridge Spy Ring revealed

A sixth member of the Cambridge Spy Ring has been revealed as an MI6 physicist known to colleagues as "Atomic Man", according to an expert who has devoted 30 years into researching the infamous group.

Wilfred Mann denied the allegations that he was a KGB agent, helping the Russians develop their own atom bomb, in his 1982 book Was There A Fifth Man?

But author Andrew Lownie, who has written a book about another of the Cambridge spies, Guy Burgess, uncovered documents in his research that he claims prove Mann was the sixth member of the ring. ...

Mr Lownie claims Mann was the KGB spy foiled by the CIA in 1948, known as "Basil" in the 1979 book The Climate of Treason by Andrew Boyle. Basil was Mann’s middle name.

Boyle’s book recounts how "Basil" chose to become a double agent for the CIA rather than be prosecuted in the USA.


¡Estiveo! come home.

User avatar
Kriselda Gray
Posts: 8645
Joined: Fri Aug 14, 2009 4:17 am
Location: FEMA Camp 2112 - a joint project of the U.S. and Canada
Contact:

Re: Spy Games

#21

Post by Kriselda Gray » Mon Sep 07, 2015 10:14 am

Interesting...


Ignorance and prejudice and fear walk hand in hand... - "Witch Hunt" by Rush

SCMP = SovCits/Militias/Patriots.

Thor promised to slay the Ice Giants
God promised to quell all evil
-----
I'm not seeing any Ice Giants...

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 26492
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: Spy Games

#22

Post by Addie » Thu Sep 17, 2015 10:23 am

Tucson Weekly
The Rosenbergs’ Truth in Fiction

Ethel and Julius Rosenberg were executed on June 19, 1953, the only Americans put to death during the Cold War between the United Sates and the former Soviet Union.

In the minds of many Americans during Sen. Joseph McCarthy's 1950's witchhunt to find Communists under every bed—perhaps still today—the Rosenbergs were executed for providing the former Soviet Union with the secret to constructing the atomic bomb. The actual charges against the couple were "conspiracy to commit espionage."

Were they guilty, and if they were, did they deserve to be executed?

The fact of their execution still incites debate. And Jillian Cantor, 37, author of The Hours Count: A Novel, which debuts next month, doesn't shy away from the ongoing controversy. Was it the inextricable fear of "the other, communism, or anti-Semitism," which sealed their conviction?, she asks. Both of the Rosenbergs were first-generation Jewish-Americans, born in New York to immigrant parents. ...

Just this August, Michael and Robert Meeropol called on President Obama to acknowledge that their biological mother, Ethel Rosenberg, was wrongly convicted and executed. In a New York Times opinion piece, the brothers insist that "the government held her hostage to coerce our father to talk, and when that failed, it extracted false statements to secure her wrongful conviction" ("The Meeropol Brothers: Exonerate Our Mother, Ethel Rosenberg," New York Times, Aug. 10, 2015.


¡Estiveo! come home.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 26492
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: Spy Games

#23

Post by Addie » Mon Oct 26, 2015 9:44 am

New York Times
Russian Ships Near Data Cables Are Too Close for U.S. Comfort

WASHINGTON — Russian submarines and spy ships are aggressively operating near the vital undersea cables that carry almost all global Internet communications, raising concerns among some American military and intelligence officials that the Russians might be planning to attack those lines in times of tension or conflict.

The issue goes beyond old worries during the Cold War that the Russians would tap into the cables — a task American intelligence agencies also mastered decades ago. The alarm today is deeper: The ultimate Russian hack on the United States could involve severing the fiber-optic cables at some of their hardest-to-access locations to halt the instant communications on which the West’s governments, economies and citizens have grown dependent.

While there is no evidence yet of any cable cutting, the concern is part of a growing wariness among senior American and allied military and intelligence officials over the accelerated activity by Russian armed forces around the globe. At the same time, the internal debate in Washington illustrates how the United States is increasingly viewing every Russian move through a lens of deep distrust, reminiscent of relations during the Cold War.

Inside the Pentagon and the nation’s spy agencies, the assessments of Russia’s growing naval activities are highly classified and not publicly discussed in detail. American officials are secretive about what they are doing both to monitor the activity and to find ways to recover quickly if cables are cut. But more than a dozen officials confirmed in broad terms that it had become the source of significant attention in the Pentagon.

“I’m worried every day about what the Russians may be doing,” said Rear Adm. Frederick J. Roegge, commander of the Navy’s submarine fleet in the Pacific, who would not answer questions about possible Russian plans for cutting the undersea cables.


¡Estiveo! come home.

User avatar
ZekeB
Posts: 14506
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 10:07 pm
Location: Northwest part of Semi Blue State

Re: Spy Games

#24

Post by ZekeB » Mon Oct 26, 2015 10:27 am

Like we didn't do this at Petropavlovsk during the Cold War? We attached a listening device that hauled in all the data that came across their cable. Be careful of what you do to your enemies, lest they do the same to you.


Ano, jsou opravdové. - Stormy Daniels

User avatar
SueDB
Posts: 27756
Joined: Thu Sep 30, 2010 2:02 pm
Location: FEMA Camp PI Okanogan, WA 98840

Re: Spy Games

#25

Post by SueDB » Mon Oct 26, 2015 10:57 am

ZekeB wrote:Like we didn't do this at Petropavlovsk during the Cold War? We attached a listening device that hauled in all the data that came across their cable. Be careful of what you do to your enemies, lest they do the same to you.
That where we were reading a "wire" cable that we could wrap magnetic/electric field sensors around it. Fiber Optic cables are quite resistant to "tapping" and cutting them is the war solution. Fiber Optics don't put up magnetic fields when data is pushed through them.


“If You're Not In The Obit, Eat Breakfast”

Remember, Orly NEVAH disappoints!

Post Reply

Return to “Foreign Policy”