Iraq II (formerly named Al Qaeda)

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 27316
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Iraq II (formerly named Al Qaeda)

#201

Post by Addie » Mon Sep 08, 2014 8:06 pm

BBC News Iraq crisis: Parliament swears in unity government Iraq's parliament has approved a new government with Sunni and Kurdish deputy prime ministers, as it seeks to tackle Islamic State (IS) militants who have seized large parts of the country. Saleh al-Mutlak and Hoshyar Zebari were approved under a power-sharing deal after weeks of political deadlock. PM Haidar al-Abadi, a moderate Shia, was asked to form a government with the resignation of Nouri Maliki. The US said the new government was a "major milestone" for Iraq. US Secretary of State John Kerry praised the inclusive nature of the new government and said he would travel to the Middle East on Tuesday to help build "the broadest possible coalition of partners" to defeat IS.


¡Sterngard! come home.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 27316
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: Iraq II (formerly named Al Qaeda)

#202

Post by Addie » Tue Jan 19, 2016 8:56 am

CNN
Nearly 19,000 civilians killed in Iraq in 21-month period, report says

(CNN)Nearly 19,000 civilians were killed in Iraq between January 2014 and October 2015 -- a toll the United Nations calls "staggering" in a new report.

The report, released Tuesday, outlines the horrific impact that Iraq's ongoing conflict is having on its civilian population. ...

"The so-called 'Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant' (ISIL) continues to commit systematic and widespread violence and abuses of international human rights law and humanitarian law. These acts may, in some instances, amount to war crimes, crimes against humanity, and possibly genocide," the report said, using another name for ISIS.

The manner of death was equally horrifying, the report says: shooting, beheading, bulldozing, burning alive and throwing people off the top of buildings. ...

"Even the obscene casualty figures fail to accurately reflect exactly how terribly civilians are suffering in Iraq. The figures capture those who were killed or maimed by overt violence, but countless others have died from the lack of access to basic food, water or medical care," the high commissioner said.


¡Sterngard! come home.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 27316
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: Iraq II (formerly named Al Qaeda)

#203

Post by Addie » Sat May 12, 2018 8:28 am

WaPo
What Iraq’s election means for its Shiite militias

Iraq’s parliamentary elections today will be the country’s first elections since the Islamic State was militarily defeated last December, and there are hopes Iraq will turn a new chapter and move forward in its attempts to remedy ongoing challenges to its security, endemic corruption and the polarization within its society and political elites.

There are few certainties in an election in which close to 7,000 candidates are running for just 329 seats — in a country where the political landscape has become increasingly fragmented. One near-certain outcome is the political ascendancy of Iraq’s Shiite militias, the most dominant of which currently lead the Popular Mobilization Force (PMF) and have extensive ties to Iran. This 100,000 strong umbrella militia organization of predominantly Shiite fighters was mobilized to fill the security vacuum that followed the Islamic State’s seizure of Mosul and the subsequent collapse of the Iraqi armed forces.

Since the war on the Islamic State started, the plethora of pre-existing groups and newly formed volunteer fighters within the PMF have won widespread prominence for their battlefield successes. This has been helped by the decline in prestige of, and respect for, the Iraqi army, in large part because of its embarrassing collapse in 2014 but also because many in Iraq see it as a corrupted institution whose history is steeped in oppression and brutality.

Shiite militias in Iraq have fought — and suffered defeats — against Iraq’s U.S.-trained and backed military and were consequently marginalized at varying intervals. They operate as mafia-style organizations that engage in criminal activities, extortion and human rights abuses.

The picture becomes complicated because of the remarkable manner in which Shiite militias in Iraq have evolved and the extent to which they – and the institution of the PMF – have maintained their autonomy, despite on paper being components of the Iraqi state that answer to the government. The Badr Brigade militia organization has controlled Iraq’s Interior Ministry and its 37,000-strong personnel since 2003. Rag-tag militias like Asaib ahl al-Haq have evolved into powerful socio-cultural movements that have enhanced their political credentials and have shed their bloodied reputations by bandwagoning onto existing parties and institutions. These actors have formally integrated into the Iraqi state and have weaponized the Iraqi state’s resources and its sovereignty (for international recognition) – while retaining their operational and financial autonomy.


¡Sterngard! come home.

User avatar
Volkonski
Posts: 18221
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Re: Iraq II (formerly named Al Qaeda)

#204

Post by Volkonski » Mon May 14, 2018 10:02 am

Cleric who fought US takes surprise lead in Iraq elections

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/ ... 1526295124
An Iraqi nationalist cleric who led two uprisings against US troops has taken a surprise lead in parliamentary elections, fending off Iran-backed rivals and the country’s incumbent prime minister, the electoral commission has said.

With 95% of the votes counted in 10 of Iraq’s 18 provinces, Moqtadr al-Sadr, a rare enemy of both the US and Iran, is ahead with Tehran-backed Shia militia chief Hadi al-Amiri’s bloc in second place and the prime minister, Haider al-Abadi, trailing in third.

The preliminary results are a severe setback for Abadi, who had entered the election campaign as the frontrunner.

Sadr has a zealous following among the young, poor and dispossessed but had been sidelined by influential Iranian-backed figures.
Interesting.


Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 27316
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: Iraq II (formerly named Al Qaeda)

#205

Post by Addie » Sat May 19, 2018 8:36 pm

CBC
Coalition led by anti-U.S. cleric wins Iraq election

A political bloc led by populist Shia cleric Muqtada al-Sadr, a long-time adversary of the United States who also opposes Iranian influence in Iraq, has won the country's parliamentary election, the electoral commission said on Saturday.

Sadr himself cannot become prime minister because he did not run in the election, though his bloc's victory puts him in a position to have a strong say in negotiations. His Sairoon electoral list captured 54 parliamentary seats.

The Victory Alliance, headed by incumbent Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, trailed in third place with 42 seats, behind the Al-Fatih bloc, which won 47 seats.

Al-Fatih is led by Hadi al-Amiri, who has close ties with Iran and heads an umbrella group of paramilitaries that played a key role in defeating ISIS.

The results were announced a week after Iraqis voted in a nationwide election, which produced surprising results amid a historically low turnout.


¡Sterngard! come home.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 27316
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: Iraq II (formerly named Al Qaeda)

#206

Post by Addie » Sat Sep 08, 2018 3:41 pm

Associated Press
12 dead in Basra as rockets fired at airport and Iranian consulate torched

Unknown assailants fired three Katyusha rockets at Iraq's Basra airport Saturday, an airport official said, after a chaotic and violent night that saw hundreds of protesters burning tires on main streets and highways and setting ablaze the Iranian consulate in the city.

The protests in Basra are the most serious to shake Iraq's oil-rich southern Shiite heartland in years. Protesters are calling for an end to endemic corruption, soaring joblessness and poor public services and have turned their rage on neighboring Iran, blaming its outsized influence in Iraq's political affairs for their misery.

The official said it was not clear who was behind the Saturday morning attack on Basra airport, which also houses the US consulate. He said the attack occurred at about 8 a.m. local time and did not cause casualties or disrupt flights in or out of the city. The official spoke on condition of anonymity, citing security concerns. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the attack.

Hours earlier, protesters shouting anti-Iranian slogans including "Iran, out, out!" stormed the Iranian consulate and set a fire inside. They also burned an Iranian flag and trampled over a portrait of Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

Iran's Foreign Ministry spokesman, Bahram Ghasemi, condemned the attack, which he said caused significant damage to the building. He called for maximum punishment for the assailants.


¡Sterngard! come home.

User avatar
Volkonski
Posts: 18221
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Re: Iraq II (formerly named Al Qaeda)

#207

Post by Volkonski » Fri Sep 28, 2018 4:26 pm


ABC News

Verified account

@ABC
Following Following @ABC
More
NEW: U.S. orders departure of all U.S. government personnel from Consulate in Basra, Iraq, citing an increased threat from Iranian-backed militias. https://abcn.ws/2DFA89X


Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 27316
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: Iraq II (formerly named Al Qaeda)

#208

Post by Addie » Wed Oct 03, 2018 10:47 am

WaPo
After months of deadlock, Iraqis name new president and prime minister

BAGHDAD — Iraqis named a president and a prime minister designate Tuesday, capping five months of halting negotiations that played out amid widening popular unrest and an intensifying rivalry between the United States and Iran for influence over Iraq’s leadership.

Within an hour of Iraq’s parliament electing veteran Kurdish politician Barham Salih as president, he announced that he had asked former oil minister Adel Abdul Mahdi to form the next government.

The selection of the men showed how the sectarian loyalties in Iraq’s Kurdish, Sunni Arab and Shiite Arab communities that have prevailed since the U.S. invasion in 2003 are breaking down, giving way to more-pragmatic coalitions that cut across sectarian lines.

Salih, 58, was chosen as president, a largely ceremonial post, after trouncing his Kurdish rival by a vote of 219 to 22, signaling overwhelming support among the legislature’s Arab majority for Salih’s brand of conciliatory politics.

Abdul Mahdi, 76, a Shiite with no recent party affiliation, will hold the vast majority of executive power, and his selection represents a compromise by the top finishers in May’s election, Iraqi and American officials said.



Post Reply

Return to “Foreign Policy”