Venezuela, Post-Chavez

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Addie
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Re: Venezuela, Post-Chavez

#501

Post by Addie » Thu Dec 20, 2018 11:28 am

Associated Press - Dec 14
Venezuelan exodus to reach 5.3 million by 2019, UN says

'Forced displacement' could cost humanitarian organizations $738M US


The United Nations says the number of Venezuelans fleeing the country's economic and humanitarian crisis is expected to reach 5.3 million by the end of 2019 in what has become the largest exodus in modern Latin American history.

The UN High Commissioner for Refugees said Friday that humanitarian organizations will need $738 million US to provide migrants with critical services like food and emergency shelter as added stress is put on receiving nations.

"We know that thousands leave every day, so if you do the math, I think if we're not there [yet], we'll be at the same scale of the Syrian displacement quite soon," Feline Freier, a professor and researcher at the Universidad del Pacífico in Peru, told CBC News in September.

"We're talking about forced displacement. These people leave Venezuela because if they do not leave, they don't survive."
Adding:
UNHCR: Emergency plan for refugees and migrants from Venezuela launched



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Addie
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Re: Venezuela, Post-Chavez

#502

Post by Addie » Thu Jan 10, 2019 1:59 pm

WaPo
Venezuela’s crisis deepens by the day. But Maduro is celebrating the start of six more years in office.

CARACAS, Venezuela — President Nicolás Maduro is set to be sworn in for a second term Thursday at a moment when there is little for him to celebrate.

His country is collapsing. There are signs of dissent in his inner circle. Socialist Venezuela is increasingly isolated, and its neighborhood has never been more unfriendly.

And yet, after an election in May tainted by allegations of fraud, Maduro begins his next six-year stint seemingly in a position of relative strength at home. According to Félix Seijas, head of the Caracas-based polling firm Delphos, the president remains extraordinarily unpopular, but so does his opposition — perhaps even more so. ...

“It is risky to predict 2019 will mark the end of Maduro’s authoritarian rule,” said Michael Shifter, president of the Inter-American Dialogue, a Washington-based think tank. “Some have been saying his days are numbered since he came to power nearly six years ago. For various reasons, he has proven to be more resilient than many expected.” ...

According to a U.S. intelligence official who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss ­sensitive matters freely, Maduro’s defense minister, Vladimir Padrino López, told the president last month to step down or accept his resignation — a threat he has yet to act on.

Maduro is also facing high-level defections. Christian Zerpa, a justice on the pro-government Supreme Court, fled to the United States this week and denounced the president. During a news conference in Orlando, he called the May presidential election unfair and described Maduro’s rule as “a dictatorship.” He also accused Maduro of frequently taking direct orders from Cuban officials.



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Addie
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Re: Venezuela, Post-Chavez

#503

Post by Addie » Tue Jan 15, 2019 1:51 pm

CNN
Trump considering recognizing Venezuelan opposition leader as legitimate President

Washington (CNN)President Donald Trump is considering recognizing Venezuela's opposition leader as the legitimate president of the country, three sources familiar with the matter told CNN, a significant move that would increase pressure on Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro.

Trump is weighing recognizing the country's National Assembly President Juan Guaido as the legitimate Venezuelan leader after Maduro, a socialist authoritarian who has presided over Venezuela's political and economic crisis, was sworn in last week for a second term.

The Venezuelan opposition, the United States and dozens of other countries have decried Maduro's presidency illegitimate and the country's constitution says a presidential vacancy can be filled by the president of the National Assembly.

National Security Council spokesman Garrett Marquis declined to confirm that Trump is weighing this step, but said the US has "expressed its support for Juan Guaido, who as President of the democratically-elected National Assembly has courageously declared his constitutional authority to invoke Article 233 and call for free and fair elections."



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