To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

Post Reply
User avatar
Addie
Posts: 33899
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#1

Post by Addie » Sun May 07, 2017 8:37 am

New York Times OpEd
To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants ...

Immigration has been expanding the United States population at a rate of about one million people a year over the last decade. It’s not clear exactly how much President Trump’s policies will reduce the net flow of immigrants, given that he has yet to articulate a broad-based immigration program. Prime Minister Theresa May of Britain has been more explicit, promising to cut the net inflow to the “sustainable level” of under 100,000 immigrants a year, down from an average of 250,000 in the last decade. For these leaders, delivering on these anti-immigrant messages may now be politically imperative, but it will seriously handicap their economies in the global growth sweepstakes.

History is littered with examples of emerging nations that have failed to generate enough jobs for a booming young population. But virtually no nation has ever sustained rapid economic growth without strong population growth. And at a time when every major country including the United States faces continued decline in population growth, workers are an increasingly precious source of national economic strength.

In the long run, governments have limited avenues to increase the growth rate of the labor force, which is unaffected by short-term fluctuations in unemployment. Even enticing the “forgotten men” — those no longer looking for work — back into the labor force can have only limited impact. The main reason fewer Americans participate in the labor force is not because they are discouraged, but because they are getting older.

In recent decades nations from Australia to France to Singapore have foreseen the looming economic impact of slower population growth, offering families “baby bonuses” to have more kids — but typically with little impact on the birthrate or the economy. The impulse to procreate may be one of the few areas of human endeavor that remains beyond the reach of government mandarins. In contrast, regulating immigration remains a relatively simple task, and if immigrants are properly assimilated, they can have an immediate impact on the size of the work force.

It would be unrealistic to imagine that hard economic logic will turn the anti-global, anti-foreign tide any time soon. So the likely result is that the United States and Britain will go ahead and limit immigration. To the extent they do — and their rivals do not — they will undermine their key economic edge, and cede much of the growth advantage they have enjoyed over Europe and Japan.
Democracy is a garden that has to be tended. -Barack Obama

User avatar
TollandRCR
Posts: 20731
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 11:17 pm
Location: RIP, my friend. - Foggy

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#2

Post by TollandRCR » Sun May 07, 2017 1:57 pm

The last thing that we ought to be seeking for the globe is population growth. Eleven billion in 2100 is too much. International migration, on the other hand, could both grow the populations of specific nations and in many cases alleviate the problems of the sending countries, including those problems caused by climate change.
“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 33899
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#3

Post by Addie » Mon Jan 07, 2019 9:28 am

Texas Observer
These Rural Panhandle Towns Should be Shrinking. But Thanks to Immigrants, They’re Booming.

In the farming town of Dalhart, where voters resoundingly put Trump in office, immigrants have staved off population loss and boosted the local economy.


At 1 a.m., after many rural Texas towns have turned in for the night, a light but steady stream of traffic rolls through the main drag of Dalhart, a Texas Panhandle town of 8,300. There’s a line for coffee at the Toot’n Totum downtown. Idling pickups and rattling trailers punctuate what would otherwise be a quiet, country night. It’s now that a small army of Mexican and Guatemalan laborers load into tractors and trailers, driving on gravel roads until they reach the potato furrows of Larsen Farms, a 3,700-acre operation just west of Dalhart. On one blustery October night, a bracing wind laced with the stench of cow manure whips through the treeless expanse. The only light comes from the high beams of the tractors plowing up the tubers and the encumbered trailers hauling them from the fields back to massive warehouses closer to town. Because the fragile-skinned potatoes can’t be harvested in the daytime heat, the workers toil when temperatures allow.

As tractors outfitted with conveyor belts churn the potatoes from the earth and shoot them into open tractor-trailers, Luis Ramos tails the machines in a pickup. The 44-year-old from Durango, Mexico, monitors the harvesting teams and fixes mechanical problems with the machinery. Other workers operate the harvesting equipment, while still others sort bad potatoes from good. The hours are rough, sometimes 1 a.m. to 3 p.m., and the pay’s not great, usually less than $12 an hour. Most U.S. citizens just don’t want the work. But for Ramos, the logic is inexorable: “What I make here in a day, I can’t make in a week back home.”

Ramos and other immigrants have helped transform many dying Panhandle towns into agricultural boomtowns, injecting economic and social vigor into communities with uncertain futures. Despite a decline in native-born residents, a belt of communities in the Panhandle — Dalhart, Sunray and Dumas — and several others near the Texas-Mexico border are growing. Dalhart has grown 7 percent from 1990 to 2016, even as the native-born population has dropped 9 percent. Hispanics, primarily of Mexican descent, now make up 39 percent of the town’s population. The Center for American Progress, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank, released a report earlier this year tracking immigration in rural America, finding that immigrants were “putting communities on a path to prosperity” by mitigating population loss in small towns. Statewide, Texas added 400,000 residents in 2017, bringing its total population to 28.3 million. About one-quarter of that growth is attributed to international migration.

But Texas’ population gains haven’t been distributed equally throughout the state, and some parts of rural Texas have been left out. In Lorraine, for instance, the small farms that once drove the economy in this Big Country town of 582 people have dried up, and many folks have left. Storefronts downtown are mostly vacant, boarded up or demolished. The local public school, which serves K-12 and an unusually high number of homeless students, is one of the few institutions left. Even the churches can’t fill their sanctuaries anymore. The tiny community of Crowell, located 80 miles west of Wichita Falls, has seen its population dwindle by half since 1950. “It’s just headed in the wrong direction,” one resident told the Dallas Morning News in 2015. “You can feel it.”

It’s a different story in Dalhart, tucked into the Panhandle’s northwest corner. A digital billboard on the town’s main drag flashes job offers for hotels, farms, dairies and trucking companies. Cattle trailers, RVs and hay-hauling pickups whoosh by endlessly; pedestrians actually have to use the crosswalk to get across safely. The storefronts downtown are occupied by banks, clothing shops, art galleries and theaters — on weekdays, you can barely find a place to park.

User avatar
Volkonski
Posts: 22691
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#4

Post by Volkonski » Fri Jan 11, 2019 9:41 am

Canada sees an opportunity handed to it by Trump.

Indian technology talent is flocking to Canada

https://www.economist.com/business/2018 ... -to-canada
What would induce a software developer to quit a good job in Silicon Valley and trade California’s sunshine for Toronto’s wintry skies? For Vikram Rangnekar, born in India and educated in America, the triggers were the restrictions placed on immigrant tech workers holding an h-1b visa (starting companies or taking long holidays is discouraged) and what looked like a 20-year wait to get the green card he needed in order to settle down. Rising anti-immigrant sentiment under President Donald Trump’s administration did not help. Two years later he thinks he made the right choice. “I didn’t want to spend the best years of my life on a restrictive visa.”
Trump’s immigration policy has foreign tech talent looking north of the border

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/th ... b02e157dfa
Over dinner at a noodle bar, a Canadian entrepreneur pitched a table of U.S. tech executives: Your foreign workers should trade sunny California for snowy Calgary, he told them. And they listened.

Highly skilled foreign workers and the American firms that employ them are in a bit of a visa panic. President Trump has vowed to crack down on the H-1B visa program, which allows 85,000 foreigners per year to work in “specialty occupations” in the United States. But there are no new rules yet, creating a climate of uncertainty and fear, particularly in Silicon Valley.

Canadian businesses sense an opportunity. The Canadian tech scene has sought for years to compete with Silicon Valley, trying to lure talent north. In the early days of the Trump administration, “moving to Canada” talk surged among Americans, but most foreign workers waited.

Now some are making the move.
Canada wants 1 million more immigrants over next 3 years

https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/canada- ... itter_abcn
"Thanks in great part to the newcomers we have welcomed throughout our history, Canada has developed into the strong and vibrant country we all enjoy," Ahmed Hussen, minister of immigration, refugees and citizenship, wrote in an annual report to Parliament. "Immigrants and their descendants have made immeasurable contributions to Canada, and our future success depends on continuing to ensure they are welcomed and well-integrated."
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

User avatar
Volkonski
Posts: 22691
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#5

Post by Volkonski » Fri Jan 11, 2019 9:55 am

Maggie Haberman

Verified account

@maggieNYT
58m58 minutes ago
More
Possible that Trump saw this story and reacted.
This refers to the 2nd article above. Anyone know what Trump action she is referring to?
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

User avatar
Volkonski
Posts: 22691
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#6

Post by Volkonski » Fri Jan 11, 2019 10:09 am

Probably this-
Donald J. Trump

Verified account

@realDonaldTrump
Follow Follow @realDonaldTrump
More
H1-B holders in the United States can rest assured that changes are soon coming which will bring both simplicity and certainty to your stay, including a potential path to citizenship. We want to encourage talented and highly skilled people to pursue career options in the U.S.

6:40 AM - 11 Jan 2019
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 33899
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#7

Post by Addie » Fri Jan 11, 2019 1:29 pm

WaPo
A wall can’t solve America’s addiction to undocumented immigration

For more than 70 years, undocumented immigrants have shaped the U.S. economy. ...


Yet we are also clearly in denial about our role in this addiction. It’s tempting to believe the problem is not our fault: after all, the vast majority of us don’t own a golf club with undocumented housekeepers on our staff. Indeed, most Americans don’t employ any domestic labor at all. But we all participate in — and profit from — an economy that relies on undocumented labor. From the food we eat to the hotels we stay at to the built environment that surrounds us, almost no American goes a day without benefiting from the labor of undocumented immigrants.

The roots of our addiction can be traced to the early 1920s, when Americans began to rely on immigrants from Mexico to replace the European and Asian immigrants who had been barred from entry into the United States by new quota laws. During the Depression, however, the need for immigrant labor diminished, and Mexicans were rounded up and deported en masse during the repatriation drives of 1929-1936.

As the economy ramped up during World War II, demand for Mexican labor resurged. In 1942, Mexico and the U.S. cooperated to establish the Bracero Program, which brought legal Mexican guest workers in unprecedented numbers — up to a half million per year after 1955 — to work in the agricultural and manufacturing sectors. Nevertheless, the demand for labor was usually greater than the number of visas allocated to the program, so undocumented migration grew as well during this period.

Along with the growth in undocumented labor came political and social opposition to it. By 1954, this opposition grew significant enough that the federal government launched Operation Wetback, ultimately deporting around 300,000 Mexican immigrants. Yet this military-style roundup would in no way put an end to the problem of undocumented immigration, even after 1964, when the Bracero Program was phased out entirely.

That’s because, by the mid-1960s, the American appetite for the cheapest possible immigrant labor had become insatiable. At the same time, Mexico’s population was growing exponentially, with a labor market that failed to provide sufficient economic opportunities for working-age people. Despite this potential parity between supply and demand, Mexicans only rarely received the necessary visas for legal immigration to the United States, because despite its liberalism in other areas, the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act placed an annual cap of 120,000 migrants from the entire Western hemisphere. Together, all these factors helped the number of undocumented immigrants from Mexico to skyrocket after 1970.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 33899
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#8

Post by Addie » Wed Apr 10, 2019 2:36 pm

Brookings Institution - William H. Frey
America is not full. Its future rests with young immigrants.

President Trump’s pronouncement that the U.S. is “full” and that there is no need for attracting future immigrants is exactly the opposite of what our demographic future portends. If anything, the nation is sputtering from historic demographic stagnation. We recently registered the slowest national growth rate in 80 years due to declining natural increase—as births lower and deaths rise. In the near future, we will become increasingly dependent on immigration and racial minorities— particularly young first and second generation Hispanic and Asian Americans—to infuse growth and vitality into our population and our economy.

Census projections make clear that during the first half of the 21st century, our population growth will diminish: there will be less than half the growth in 2040-50 than in 2000-2010 (Figure 1). This decline would occur even more quickly were it not for immigration, which, if it continues at recent levels, will account for most of our national growth after 2030.

U.S. population growth 2000-2050



This growth slowdown is driven heavily by the aging of our population and an increased mortality rate. As Figure 2 illustrates, the only part of our population that will continue to grow substantially will be the senior population, aged 65 and above, as it subsumes the large baby boom population. Already this decade, seniors will have grown by nearly 40 percent, to be followed by 30 percent more growth in the 2020s. We are headed toward higher age dependency; a stark contrast from the last half of the 20th century when child dependency was more salient. By 2035, there will be more seniors than children for the first time in the nation’s history.


User avatar
Addie
Posts: 33899
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#9

Post by Addie » Sat Jul 13, 2019 9:08 am

CNN
Beyond the border: Tracking America's hidden workforce

Worthington, Minnesota (CNN) The encounters unfold in countless border towns along the Rio Grande. In ramshackle shelters and bus terminals, reporters at the southern border record the stories of undocumented immigrants crossing into the United States, hearing their plans to start new lives in every corner of America.

But that's only the beginning of the immigrants' journey. Once the interviews are finished, these undocumented immigrants disappear into the fabric of American society, where the vast majority become vital to our economy in ways most might not fully realize.

These are some of the stories we uncovered investigating the country's hidden workforce.

Politics vs. reality

When we talk about undocumented workers, we often think about their presence in America's biggest cities -- places like Miami and New York; Los Angeles and Washington, DC.

But with an estimated 7.6 million undocumented workers in the US, you'll find them working in the shadows of America's small towns and rural communities, too -- communities like Worthington, Minnesota.

User avatar
pipistrelle
Posts: 6723
Joined: Wed Oct 19, 2016 11:26 am

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#10

Post by pipistrelle » Sat Jul 13, 2019 9:45 am

The people I know who complain loudest about immigration have witnessed no ill effects. They’re afraid of the bogeyman invented to scare them.

User avatar
Chilidog
Posts: 9864
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 11:36 am

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#11

Post by Chilidog » Sat Jul 13, 2019 10:08 am

The latest bullshit on Facebook.

PaulG
Posts: 516
Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 7:06 pm

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#12

Post by PaulG » Sat Jul 13, 2019 8:29 pm

Where the hell do they get the 56 billion from, how do they know it was sent by undocumented, why do they assume the workers weren't entitled to any benefits they got, and if you sent them home, we'd need just as many people working for crap wages, needing the same benefits and if you think you problems now, try pulliong this shit with fat americans in MAGA hats. Oh, the hell with it. These guys are a wretched bunch of xenophile trash.

User avatar
RTH10260
Posts: 21749
Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2010 8:52 am
Location: Near the Swiss Alps

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#13

Post by RTH10260 » Sat Jul 13, 2019 10:20 pm

PaulG wrote:
Sat Jul 13, 2019 8:29 pm
Where the hell do they get the 56 billion from, how do they know it was sent by undocumented, why do they assume the workers weren't entitled to any benefits they got, and if you sent them home, we'd need just as many people working for crap wages, needing the same benefits and if you think you problems now, try pulliong this shit with fat americans in MAGA hats. Oh, the hell with it. These guys are a wretched bunch of xenophile trash.
How do they know that all illegals came with yuuuge families in tow :?:

User avatar
neonzx
Posts: 6112
Joined: Tue Mar 10, 2009 9:27 am

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#14

Post by neonzx » Sat Jul 13, 2019 11:13 pm

RTH10260 wrote:
Sat Jul 13, 2019 10:20 pm
PaulG wrote:
Sat Jul 13, 2019 8:29 pm
Where the hell do they get the 56 billion from, how do they know it was sent by undocumented, why do they assume the workers weren't entitled to any benefits they got, and if you sent them home, we'd need just as many people working for crap wages, needing the same benefits and if you think you problems now, try pulliong this shit with fat americans in MAGA hats. Oh, the hell with it. These guys are a wretched bunch of xenophile trash.
How do they know that all illegals came with yuuuge families in tow :?:
I don't know where they got the $56b figure. Did they guesstimate it and then divide by current thinking that the undocumented and those on expired I-94s is 11 million and multiplied an estmate of $5000/yr ($416/mo) person to get to $56b?

Many adults of every classification send money out of the country, including citizens (naturalized and nbc), work visas holders, permanent residents, and yes those without a valid status, too. We're all immigrants.
To which Trump replied, Fuck the law. I don't give a fuck about the law. I want my fucking money.

User avatar
Lani
Posts: 4787
Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2012 4:01 pm
Location: Some island in the Pacific

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#15

Post by Lani » Sat Jul 13, 2019 11:36 pm

$56B from immigrants? How about the amount sent overseas by citizens and US companies to hide in tax-free accounts and to launder money?
Insert signature here: ____________________________________________________

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 33899
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#16

Post by Addie » Sun Aug 18, 2019 10:26 am

Axios
Immigrant-owned businesses contribute billions to U.S. economy ...

By the numbers:
1 out of every 5 entrepreneurs in the U.S. is an immigrant. Approximately 3.2 million immigrants run their own businesses, says NAE, a group that supports immigration.

These businesses generate $1.3 trillion in total sales and $405.5 billion in tax revenue annually.

Almost 8 million Americans are employed at immigrant-run businesses, according to NAE.

Nearly half of all immigrant-owned startups are in accommodation and food service, retail trade, professional and technical services, says the National Bureau of Economic Research.

In 2012, immigrants started 40% of new businesses in California, New Jersey and New York. These states have some of the largest immigrant populations in the country, the National Bureau of Economic Research found.

Plus, Latino immigrants are more likely to start small businesses than American-born Latinos, according to the U.S. Small Business Administration.
Go deeper... Study: Immigrants and their kids founded 45% of U.S. Fortune 500 companies

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 33899
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#17

Post by Addie » Sun Aug 18, 2019 1:30 pm

New York Times OpEd - Anastasia Edel
The Tired and Poor Who Make America Great

As long as the Statue of Liberty stands, it renders Donald Trump an impostor.

America is on the verge of grand human re-sorting. On Monday, the Trump administration announced new immigration rules that favor younger, healthier and wealthier newcomers, and make it easier to deny permanent residency to those relying on public assistance programs like Medicaid, or those who don’t show enough funds on their visa applications.

When asked about the apparent contradiction between the new rules and the famous poem inviting the world’s “tired and poor” inscribed on the Statue of Liberty, Ken Cuccinelli, the acting director of the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services, suggested an interpretation that adds “standing on their own two feet” as new eligibility criteria. He then reassured the public that no revisions to the actual statue would be made. Mr. Cuccinelli’s commitment to preserving historical monuments is heartening, but it’s a bit like keeping a can from Coca-Cola, America’s other global icon, and filling it with vinegar. America is not America if a person with the proverbial $200 in his pocket is not allowed here.

When I immigrated to the “land of the free” from Russia in my early 20s, I didn’t have to rely on public assistance. But I have seen enough immigrants who did — some because they came old and sick; others because they were struck by misfortune. Neither category wanted to become “a public charge,” the term referring to individuals likely to become dependent on the government. Those who are forced to leave their home countries don’t do so because they want to freeload. But life happens, just as it does to those with American passports.

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 33899
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#18

Post by Addie » Wed Aug 21, 2019 11:29 am

NPR
Employers Struggle With Hiring Undocumented Workers: 'You Cannot Hire American Here'

The lunch rush is over at a popular, cozy restaurant in a city somewhere in Missouri. The owner, Lynn, is sipping a glass of pinot grigio as her cooking crew cleans up.

Like thousands of other restaurants across America, Lynn's kitchen is staffed mainly with unauthorized Latino workers. She agreed to openly discuss this employment conundrum if NPR agreed not to give her last name, identify her restaurant, name the city, or even specify the type of cuisine. Like a lot of employers these days, she doesn't want to attract the attention of federal immigration agents.

When asked how many eating establishments have undocumented workers in the kitchen in her Midwestern city, Lynn states flatly: "A hundred percent. You cannot hire American here." ...

Lynn maintains that Jaime and the rest of the staff, all of whom come from Central Mexico, are key to her restaurant's success. She says they're dependable, loyal and incredibly hard working. ...

President Trump, who signed the "Buy American and Hire American" executive order that led to a crackdown on visa fraud, frequently argues that unauthorized immigrants take jobs away from U.S. workers. By that logic, Jaime is taking a job away from a citizen who wants it, to which Lynn responds with a laugh.

"That is the biggest joke. I hear it all the time. We put ads on Craigslist, Facebook, in the window, in the newspaper," she says. "The people that come in and apply to take our jobs will show up for one shift. They will not be clean. They will not probably be sober. They will ask for their money at the end of the shift and then they will not be back for the second shift."

User avatar
MN-Skeptic
Posts: 2815
Joined: Wed Jan 25, 2012 6:36 pm
Location: Twin Cities

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#19

Post by MN-Skeptic » Wed Aug 21, 2019 12:43 pm

Addie wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 11:29 am
NPR
Employers Struggle With Hiring Undocumented Workers: 'You Cannot Hire American Here'
President Trump, who signed the "Buy American and Hire American" executive order that led to a crackdown on visa fraud, frequently argues that unauthorized immigrants take jobs away from U.S. workers. By that logic, Jaime is taking a job away from a citizen who wants it, to which Lynn responds with a laugh.

"That is the biggest joke. I hear it all the time. We put ads on Craigslist, Facebook, in the window, in the newspaper," she says. "The people that come in and apply to take our jobs will show up for one shift. They will not be clean. They will not probably be sober. They will ask for their money at the end of the shift and then they will not be back for the second shift."
The phrase being omitted: "American workers will not take these jobs for the salaries we are willing to pay." Offer $25/hour to wash dishes and you'll get a lot of very good American employees. No, you won't stay in business, so there is that. But, like discussions of minimum wage, it shifts the discussion to the real issue of a living wage.
MAGA - Morons Are Governing America

User avatar
ZekeB
Posts: 15917
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 10:07 pm
Location: Northwest part of Semi Blue State

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#20

Post by ZekeB » Wed Aug 21, 2019 12:58 pm

MN-Skeptic wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 12:43 pm
The phrase being omitted: "American workers will not take these jobs for the salaries we are willing to pay." Offer $25/hour to wash dishes and you'll get a lot of very good American employees. No, you won't stay in business, so there is that. But, like discussions of minimum wage, it shifts the discussion to the real issue of a living wage.
I've always felt that if employers can't afford to take care of their employees they shouldn't be in business. To do otherwise is to only be using them for one's own benefit.
Trump: Er hat eine größere Ente als ich.

Putin: Du bist kleiner als ich.

User avatar
MN-Skeptic
Posts: 2815
Joined: Wed Jan 25, 2012 6:36 pm
Location: Twin Cities

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#21

Post by MN-Skeptic » Wed Aug 21, 2019 1:00 pm

ZekeB wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 12:58 pm
MN-Skeptic wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 12:43 pm
The phrase being omitted: "American workers will not take these jobs for the salaries we are willing to pay." Offer $25/hour to wash dishes and you'll get a lot of very good American employees. No, you won't stay in business, so there is that. But, like discussions of minimum wage, it shifts the discussion to the real issue of a living wage.
I've always felt that if employers can't afford to take care of their employees they shouldn't be in business. To do otherwise is to only be using them for one's own benefit.
:yeah:
MAGA - Morons Are Governing America

User avatar
Addie
Posts: 33899
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: To Be Great Again, America Needs Immigrants

#22

Post by Addie » Thu Sep 12, 2019 10:08 am

Yahoo Finance
New research: The U.S. economy will need more immigrants soon ...

In a policy brief for the Migration Policy Institute, Georgetown University professor Harry Holzer detailed the three major shifts that the U.S. labor market will face over the next few decades — an aging workforce, automation, and alternative staffing — and argued that “increased immigration can provide many benefits to the U.S. economy.”

A Penn Wharton Budget Model (PWBM) policy paper had similar findings, indicating that “the largest positive impact on employment would come from increasing the net flow of immigrants.”

The new research comes as lawmakers continue struggling to find a solution that satisfies all parties while the Trump administration carries out its hardline immigration policies. A June Gallup poll found that 23% of Americans see immigration as the main issue in the country. That poll also indicated that 76% of people view immigration as a good thing in the country and that 43% of Americans think that immigrants are making the overall U.S. economy better.

“From an economic standpoint,” Wharton assistant professor Exequiel Hernandez said, “the research evidence is pretty clear in showing that what’s best for the U.S. economy is to have more immigration.”

Post Reply

Return to “Economy”