The Airline Industry

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GreatGrey
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Re: The Airline Industry

#26

Post by GreatGrey »

RTH10260 wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 3:40 pm
They need to fly on steam engines then impotus will pile coal money on them :twisted:
AB60CCED-9D79-4C82-B24E-66984801865E.jpeg
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I am not "someone upthread".
Trump needs to be smashed into some kind of inedible orange pâté.

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RTH10260
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Re: The Airline Industry

#27

Post by RTH10260 »

:rotflmao:

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Sam the Centipede
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Re: The Airline Industry

#28

Post by Sam the Centipede »

C'mon GG, that's a poor representation! Jet fuel has an energy density of 49 MJ/kg (that's 30 horsepower hours per pound for the more streampunky), whereas top quality coal (which aviation would use) maxes out at 32 MJ/kg (19 hp h/lb), 65% of jet fuel. So efficient and complete combustion would be essential, so no big black clouds of unburnt carbon. And certainly no huge wind-blocking chimneys; they'd be sleek rearward-pointing exhausts.

It could work by having boilers in the fuselage feeding high pressure steam to compound reciprocating engines or small steam turbines in the wings in the wings driving propellers. But that requires water to generate steam, which could be formatted in a closed cycle (plenty of cold air around to provide cooling) or a scoop could replenish supplies from lakes.

The boilers would probably use a fluidized bed combustion system to get serious heat and facilitate automation as it would be an inhospitable place to work (sorry to disappoint those who fancy a career as an Air Stoker, with possibility of promotion to Senior Air Stoker).

Alternatively, perhaps the combustion could be performed in the motors on the wings. The fuselage could have a crusher that feeds powdered coal to the motors which burn it in modified jet engines which would look like conventional turbofans. Indeed, the plane could be fueled with powdered coal, avoiding the need for an onboard crusher.

And, of course, for long flights there would need to be a large hatch in the roof to allow in-flight refueling by dropping sacks down from a refueling bunker aircraft. Another reason why exhaust chimneys are implausible.

I'm sure there are college projects around investigating the options. It's an interesting theoretical challenge to throw to a student interested in engineering and invention.

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RTH10260
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Re: The Airline Industry

#29

Post by RTH10260 »

Boeing Refuses to Cooperate With New Inquiry Into Deadly Crash

Dutch lawmakers are reviewing an investigation into the 2009 crash of a Boeing 737 NG.

By Chris Hamby and Claire Moses
Feb. 6, 2020

Boeing and American safety officials refused to cooperate on Thursday with a new inquiry by Dutch lawmakers into a deadly crash near Amsterdam in 2009 that had striking parallels with two more recent accidents involving the manufacturer’s 737 Max.

Members of the Dutch parliament wanted to question the Boeing chief executive, David Calhoun, about the company’s possible influence over the original Dutch investigation of the accident, which killed nine people on a Turkish Airlines flight. The National Transportation Safety Board also refused lawmakers’ request to participate.

The legislators initiated the review in the wake of a New York Times examination of evidence from the 2009 crash that found that Dutch safety authorities had either removed or played down some criticisms of Boeing in their accident report, after pushback from an American team that included the manufacturer and officials from the N.T.S.B. and the Federal Aviation Administration.



https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/06/busi ... quiry.html

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RTH10260
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Re: The Airline Industry

#30

Post by RTH10260 »

the mentioned NYT investigation
How Boeing’s Responsibility in a Deadly Crash ‘Got Buried’

Lessons from a 2009 Boeing plane crash would have relevance in tragedies years later.

By Chris Hamby
Published Jan. 20, 2020 Updated Jan. 21, 2020

After a Boeing 737 crashed near Amsterdam more than a decade ago, the Dutch investigators focused blame on the pilots for failing to react properly when an automated system malfunctioned and caused the plane to plummet into a field, killing nine people.

The fault was hardly the crew’s alone, however. Decisions by Boeing, including risky design choices and faulty safety assessments, also contributed to the accident on the Turkish Airlines flight. But the Dutch Safety Board either excluded or played down criticisms of the manufacturer in its final report after pushback from a team of Americans that included Boeing and federal safety officials, documents and interviews show.

The crash, in February 2009, involved a predecessor to Boeing’s 737 Max, the plane that was grounded last year after accidents in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed 346 people and hurled the company into the worst crisis in its history.

A review by The New York Times of evidence from the 2009 accident, some of it previously confidential, reveals striking parallels with the recent crashes — and resistance by the team of Americans to a full airing of findings that later proved relevant to the Max.


https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/20/busi ... dents.html

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tencats
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Re: The Airline Industry

#31

Post by tencats »

Boeing Allocates Remainder Of $100M 737 MAX Community Fund
February 18, 2020 | https://simpleflying.com/boeing-communi ... llocation/
Boeing has allocated the remaining USD$50 million from a community fund set up in 2019. The fund was designed to provide immediate financial assistance to families of victims of the two Boeing 737 MAX crashes.

At the time, the now-former Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg said;
“The tragic loss of life in both accidents continues to weigh heavily on all of us at Boeing, and we have the utmost sympathy for the loved ones of those on board.
“We are honored to take on this important assignment of providing needed financial relief to the families of these two tragedies.”

Boeing was at the receiving end of criticism from victim’s families following the crashes, accused of dragging its feet when it came to compensation. To be fair to Boeing, this was just another crisis it was attempting to negotiate in 2019.

Payments from the community fund do not require recipients to waive their rights to sue Boeing and Boeing is facing several lawsuits from victim’s families.

However, dispersing the remaining USD$50 million does allow Boeing to draw a line under one compensation plan.

Read more at https://simpleflying.com/boeing-communi ... llocation/

Jul 3, 2019
Boeing's $100 Million 737 MAX Fund Offer 'Is Disingenuous,' Lawyer Representing Families Says
https://www.forbes.com/sites/marisagarc ... 0992486ca2
:snippity:
Boeing announced the creation of the fund Wednesday ahead of Independence Day in the U.S., stating that the money "will support education, hardship and living expenses for impacted families, community programs, and economic development in impacted communities." Boeing said it would work with local governments and nonprofits to address those needs, but it gave no further details of how the fund would be managed. It said the money would be paid out "over multiple years."

Some industry watchers pointed out that this sum equates approximately to the list price for a 737 MAX. Crashes of the aircraft in Ethiopia and off Indonesia killed 346 people.

Boeing also said that its employees could donate additional funds as part of the company's charitable initiatives and that Boeing would match employee donations through the end of this year.

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RTH10260
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Re: The Airline Industry

#32

Post by RTH10260 »

from Juan Brownes latest update:

The Boeing 737MAX may not be back in service as late as Fall 2020!



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Re: The Airline Industry

#33

Post by RTH10260 »

Juan Browne discusses the latest on 737Max, Update March, and a new legislation "2020 Restoring Aviation Accountability" pending in the Senate


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RTH10260
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Re: The Airline Industry

#34

Post by RTH10260 »

50+ years ago


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RTH10260
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Re: The Airline Industry

#35

Post by RTH10260 »

Canada
Internal government docs raise new questions about approval of 737 Max
The Canadian Press
Published Friday, March 13, 2020 1:25PM EDT

OTTAWA -- Internal government documents about the Boeing 737 Max are raising new questions about Canada's aircraft approval process.

The documents, made public at a parliamentary hearing Thursday, reveal that Transport Canada test pilots voiced concerns about a key flight-control system going back more than three years before system flaws led to worldwide grounding of the plane.

The department's queries about the Max jet's anti-stall system emerged in a 2016 debriefing, but direct answers were never provided by Boeing Co. or the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, resulting in certification the next year despite the questions remaining "open."


https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/interna ... -1.4852064

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RTH10260
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Re: The Airline Industry

#36

Post by RTH10260 »

US probes large crack in Boeing 737 jet

The fissure, discovered in an aircraft flown by budget carrier Southwest, is at the center of a new air safety scandal. The US airline has faced criticism for not conducting mandatory inspections on some of its planes.

The US aviation regulator says it has launched an investigation after a 12-inch (30.5cm) crack ruptured the skin of a Boeing 737 aircraft operated by Southwest Airlines, causing the plane to gradually lose cabin pressure.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) stepped in on Friday after a plane gradually lost cabin pressure during a flight from Las Vegas to Boise, Idaho.

Flight records revealed that the pilots began a rapid, six-minute descent from 39,000 feet (990 meters) to 22,000 feet. No injuries were reported from the incident, on Monday, and the cabin pressure was safe at the lower altitude, the agency said.

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Re: The Airline Industry

#37

Post by RTH10260 »

'Unprecedented' demand drop prompts 40% capacity cut for Delta Airlines
Keith Laing The Detroit News
Published 9:56 AM EDT Mar 14, 2020

Washington — Delta Air Lines Inc., the largest flight operator at Detroit Metropolitan Airport, is cutting its flight capacity by a record 40% because of reduced demand related to the coronavirus pandemic.

In a memo to employees sent on Friday, Delta CEO Ed Bastian said the capacity reduction is the largest in the company's history, even bigger than the company's reductions after the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

Citing the suspension of many large public events and President Donald Trump's travel ban — which the White House said applies to 26 countries in Europe with open-borders agreements forming the so-called Schengen Area — Bastian said the cutback is necessary to protect the company's bottom line.

"Demand for travel is declining at an accelerated pace daily, driving an unprecedented revenue impact," Bastian wrote. "Cancellations are rising dramatically with net bookings now negative for travel over the next four weeks. To put that in perspective, we're currently seeing more cancellations than new bookings over the next month."

Bastian said Delta, which operates over 400 flights per day from Detroit Metro, is also planning to eliminates flights to most Europe destinations — excluding London — for the next 30 days, which he said could later be extended.

Delta is also planning to park up to 300 aircraft because the company's reduced capacity will require a substantially smaller fleet, he added. The airline is planning to defer new aircraft deliveries, reduce its capital expenditures by at least $2 billion for the year in a bid to preserve cash, as well as offer voluntary short-term, unpaid leaves for its employees. Delta also will impose an immediate hiring freeze.



https://eu.detroitnews.com/story/busine ... 044026002/

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RTH10260
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Re: The Airline Industry

#38

Post by RTH10260 »

Delta Airlines Update! also SWA 737 Crown Crack


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RTH10260
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Re: The Airline Industry

#39

Post by RTH10260 »

Airline Demand Collapses Overnight


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Azastan
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Re: The Airline Industry

#40

Post by Azastan »

One of my clients is a pilot for Delta. She's still on for her flights through this month, but Delta is having their pilots re-bid their flights for April, so she doesn't know if she will be flying next month.

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RTH10260
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Re: The Airline Industry

#41

Post by RTH10260 »

A chat of Sam Chui and friends while visiting the airliner scrap yard in the desert (AZ?)


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Re: The Airline Industry

#42

Post by RTH10260 »

Boeing Seeks $60 Billion Bailout For U.S. Aerospace

Jeremy Bogaisky Forbes Staff

Boeing called for at least $60 billion in financial support for U.S. aerospace companies Tuesday as they struggle with a steep falloff in revenue amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Any taxpayer-funded aid for Boeing is bound to raise criticism after a year of harsh scrutiny of its failures that led to two fatal crashes of its flagship airliner, the 737 MAX. Boeing stressed in a statement that financial support for the company would flow through to its suppliers and support the broader health of the U.S. aerospace industry. The statement didn’t specify how much of the $60 billion the company believes it needs.

“The long term outlook for the industry is still strong, but until global passenger traffic resumes to normal levels, these measures are needed to manage the pressure on the aviation sector and the economy as a whole,” Boeing said in the statement.

The plane maker and its suppliers are facing a mounting financial crisis after Boeing halted production of the 737 MAX in January. Boeing burned through billions in cash as it produced roughly 400 models of the plane that it has been unable to deliver to customers due to the plane’s grounding by global regulators.


https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeremyboga ... 307e57661c

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tek
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Re: The Airline Industry

#43

Post by tek »

Yes, let's look to Boeing for business and financial strategy.

Not.
There's no way back
from there to here

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Addie
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Re: The Airline Industry

#44

Post by Addie »

USA Today
Former UN ambassador Nikki Haley resigns from Boeing board over company's bailout request

Nikki Haley, formerly the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and governor of South Carolina, has resigned from Boeing’s board of directors because she opposes the aircraft giant’s request for a $60 billion government bailout, the company said in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing..

With the airline industry decimated by the coronavirus pandemic, Boeing has asked the federal government for $60 billion in loan guarantees and other liquidity for the aerospace manufacturing industry.

“Ambassador Haley informed the Company that, as a matter of philosophical principle, she does not believe that the Company should seek support from the Federal Government, and therefore decided to resign from the board,” Boeing said in the filing.

Haley, who joined the board last April, stepped down on Monday.
"The very least you can do in your life is to figure out what you hope for." - Barbara Kingsolver

TexasFilly
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Re: The Airline Industry

#45

Post by TexasFilly »

She quits lots of jobs.
I love the poorly educated!!!

Kevin McCarthy: Paul Ryan playing with a head injury -- Jon Lovett

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Sterngard Friegen
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Re: The Airline Industry

#46

Post by Sterngard Friegen »

Good riddance Nikki. Are you grooming for the Veep job once Trump dumps Pence?

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RTH10260
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Re: The Airline Industry

#47

Post by RTH10260 »

for airline enthusiasts
Paul Stewart wrote:Farewell and thank you - Qantas Boeing 747
29 March 2020

The Qantas Boeing 747 'Queen of the Skies' journey comes to an end today. After 5 decades flying for the 'Spirit of Australia', the final flight took place today as VH-OEE landing into Sydney Airport on 28th March 2020. Qantas 747 retirement 747 final flight Qantas Jumbo Jet

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RTH10260
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Re: The Airline Industry

#48

Post by RTH10260 »

KLM has one year early retired their 747 fleet too.

an airline vlog what was to become a last flight Sekrit Stuffs!

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RTH10260
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Re: The Airline Industry

#49

Post by RTH10260 »

The Trump administration and major airlines agreed on a $25 billion bailout.

The Trump administration has reached an agreement in principle with major airline companies over the terms of a $25 billion bailout to prop up an industry that has been hobbled by the coronavirus pandemic.

The Treasury Department said that Alaska Airlines, Allegiant Air, American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Frontier Airlines, Hawaiian Airlines, JetBlue Airways, United Airlines, SkyWest Airlines and Southwest Airlines will be participating in the payroll support program, which was created as part of the economic stabilization package that Congress passed last month.

“We welcome the news that a number of major airlines intend to participate in the Payroll Support Program,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said in a statement, saying the agreement would “support American workers and help preserve the strategic importance of the airline industry while allowing for appropriate compensation to the taxpayers.”

American Airlines said it would receive $5.8 billion as part of the deal, with more than $4 billion in grants and the remaining $1.7 billion as a low-interest loan. The funds are intended to be used to pay employees, and the airlines that take them are prohibited from major staffing or pay cuts through September.




https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/14/us/c ... k-65be3fa9

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RTH10260
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Re: The Airline Industry

#50

Post by RTH10260 »

The author is pilot at Ryanair and stationed in Spain. As captain he has also some extra qualification for pilot safety training and pilot evaluation within his airline.


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