Desperation Acres

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Addie
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Desperation Acres

#1

Post by Addie » Mon Apr 16, 2018 8:35 am

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
As dairy crisis crushes farmers, Wisconsin's rural identity in jeopardy ...

With collapsed prices of milk, grain and other commodities, farmers are losing money no matter how many 16-hour days they put in milking cows, caring for livestock, and planting and harvesting crops.

“It's pretty tough waking up every morning, going to the barn, and not being able to pay your bills, especially when you're putting in that many hours," Kurt said. "Something's got to change or the small farms are going to be gone."

Entire communities are falling apart as small farms go under, said John Peck, executive director of Family Farm Defenders, a Madison based advocacy group.

Grain mills, car dealerships and hardware stores suffer. The local tax base erodes. Churches and schools struggle or close.

“The multiplier effect on the rural economy is huge. It’s why you are seeing all these boarded-up small towns,” Peck said.

Wisconsin lost 500 dairy farms in 2017, and about 150 have quit milking cows so far this year, putting the total number of milk-cow herds at around 7,600 — down 20% from five years ago.


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Re: Desperation Acres

#2

Post by Volkonski » Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:51 am

These are indeed tough times for dairy farmers.
Americans, on average, drink 37 percent less milk today than they did in 1970, according to data from the USDA.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/won ... be789bba8c

Americans have developed a taste for other beverages. Milk's nutritional values have been called into question.
Part of that stems from a questioning of the once heralded health benefits of milk. "Fat content, flavorings, and added sugar have all been viewed with disdain as the country struggles with its child obesity epidemic," the CoBank report notes. Americans no longer need milk for Vitamin D and calcium, since they can be had in the form of pills, nutritional bars and health juices. It's not even clear if milk is all that useful in the way of bone development. Or if we're even all that well-equipped to digest it.
The glut of milk is worldwide.

Planning for milk production is complicated because cows first produce milk at about age 24 months. Farmers have to guess how many cows they will need two years in advance.

About 15% of US milk production is exported. Our top three export markets are, in order, Mexico, Canada and China. Quick, name three nations with whom Trump is upending our trade relationships.

Worldwide milk demand is down.

New Zealand's milk exports are down about 23% since 2012. New Zealand's unused capacity could more than supply Mexico, Canada and China with as much milk as those countries now import from the USA.

Note that New Zealand, Canada and Mexico are all TPP members. Times are likely to get tougher for US dairy farmers.


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Re: Desperation Acres

#3

Post by Addie » Sat Jun 02, 2018 6:06 pm

New York Times OpEd - Alfredo Corchado
The Mexican Revival of Small-Town America

KENNETT SQUARE, Pa. — Amid all the anti-immigrant fervor, nativists have overlooked a fundamental fact: In recent years, Mexican immigrants and their Mexican-American offspring have been rescuing the most iconic places in America — its small towns.

In the past 10 years, the number of Mexican immigrants living in the United States has declined by more than one million; some left by choice but tens of thousands more left through deportation. Americans who dream of an America without Mexicans should consider Kennett Square.

A town of more than 6,000 people, about an hour outside Philadelphia, Kennett Square proudly calls itself the mushroom capital of the world. The $2.7 billion mushroom industry in southeastern Pennsylvania employs 10,000 people. On New Year’s Eve, Kennett Square drops a bright mushroom cap. These days the festivities are overshadowed by fear.

“Mexicans are leaving, and that’s bad news for everyone,” Chris Alonzo, president of Pietro Industries, one of the biggest mushroom companies, and a third-generation mushroom farmer, told me. “All the negativity, the fearmongering, the anti-immigrant feeling is hurting our small town. We’re seeing labor shortages, and that threatens the vibrancy of our community.”

Kennett Square isn’t an anomaly. Across the country, cities of all sizes are coping with the loss of immigrant labor, but the impact is felt strongest in small-town America. From the meatpacking plants of Lincoln, Neb., to the service industry in Lake Geneva, Wis., immigrants and their employers are increasingly nervous. It may get worse if the trend continues. The birthrate in the United States has dropped to a 30-year low. Rumors of the presence of Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents force immigrants to plan for the worst.


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Re: Desperation Acres

#4

Post by Dolly » Sat Jun 02, 2018 6:56 pm

Thanks for starting this thread. I just read this post today. Sad.
March 15, 2018 - the end of the road

Last week while on our monthly grocery trip, we were shocked to see that milk was selling for $1.50 a gallon at ALDI in Big Rapids.

$1.50.

“Limit five,” the sign said.

Clearly, most shoppers’ reaction to these prices was to say “wow, $1.50!” and to then stock up.

For us, our hearts sank. Those farmers, their families, their cows. How in God’s name can they survive $1.50 a gallon?

This week, Dean Foods gave notice to 140 small family dairy farms in Michigan, Indiana and Ohio that after May 31 of this year, there will be no truck to pick up their milk. Walmart, the largest buyer of Dean’s milk in the region, has vertically integrated and will now be processing their own milk. But not from those farms. Those farms are too small for Walmart to waste their time with. And now, Dean has no avenue to sell those farms’ milk. After years of low prices, it is, likely, the final nail in the coffin for those farms.

These are the guys who are up at work at 5 AM feeding calves, milking cows, and cleaning barns. Then after breakfast, they don their ties and head into town for their 9-5 “day job” before coming home for evening chores and starting the routine all over again.

Truly, over 85% of farms can’t support a family, financially, without added outside income, according to recent USDA surveys.

What was once the most common job in America, now can’t even support a single family.

In a typical year, dairy farmers get only 11 cents from every dollar spent on milk.

From that 11 cents they have to pay for their mortgage, feed, fuel, labor, insurance, equipment, and any debts they have on those items. What’s left to actually feed the farmer’s family?
https://twosparrowsfarm.com/the-end-of-the-road/
Wikipedia - Big Rapids is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 10,601 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Mecosta County. The city is located within Big Rapids Township, but is politically independent.


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Re: Desperation Acres

#5

Post by Dan1100 » Sat Jun 02, 2018 7:09 pm

Off Topic
It must have been in the early 1970's, I remember listening to a successful local farmer talking to my father about why he got out of the dairy business after his family had done it for more than 50 years.

He said when the last dairy cow left it was the best day of his life. That's because when you have dairy cows, you have to be there for them every morning and every night. You can't trust anyone else to do it, so you are tied to those cows every day, day after day, year after year. After he got rid of them, he left the county for more than 1/2 a day for the first time since he graduated high school. He took his first vacation of his life (went to Indianapolis :eek2: ).


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Re: Desperation Acres

#6

Post by Suranis » Sat Jun 02, 2018 7:11 pm

I probably drink too much milk for my system, HOWEVER I recently bought a more expensive milk product and *shock* I found I was drinking it a lot less, and it tasted better.

I wonder how much of that $1:50 milk is actually milk and how much is crap diluted into it. Whatever the more expensive milk was giving me more of what I need from milk per drink, so it's actually more economical for me to drink the better quality milk. Go figure.

But ya, no-one and I mean no-one can survive on farming anymore. The middlemen are the people who actually make the money. Profit margins are now so low that you need to have a stupendous amount of product to come close to a living wage. My mother manages her farm nut to supplement her pension, and it keeps her going in her mid 70. She dropped Milk years ago as there is literally no money in it.

Speaking of which, here is a John Oliver piece on Chicken farmers, and how they are debt slaves to the Chicken companies. I'm not saying "effectively" here, they are actual debt slaves.



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Re: Desperation Acres

#7

Post by Dolly » Sat Jun 02, 2018 7:16 pm

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Tennessee Ernie Ford - Milk 'em In The Morning Blues
1957 Country Boogie



lyrics
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Re: Desperation Acres

#8

Post by Chilidog » Sat Jun 02, 2018 8:33 pm

I can pass on milk.

Just like it passes through me.


(Lactose intolerance)

I do have some distant, shirt tail relatives that are dairy farmers in Wisconsin. They have been for 100 years.

I don’t know how they are doing.

There is only one person I can ask right now. And he’s not available



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Re: Desperation Acres

#9

Post by RoadScholar » Sat Jun 02, 2018 11:11 pm

It is the fallout of runaway capitalism. It was inevitable, and the brake lines have been cut.

With no teeth in antitrust laws and few government objections to monopolies, the Walmart-ization of America, and eventually the world, continues apace. We also used to tax them stiffly, and use the proceeds to build roads and schools and benefit all the population, as a brake on runaway capitalization. But they’ve now bribed their way out of it.

And so it has come to this: Nobody can make anything anymore, almost (see below).

Nobody sews because mass-produced clothes are so cheap. Small producers of milk, eggs, corn... no way they can compete with massively automated monolithic producers. Cabinets. Bicycles. Houses. Brooms. Books. Picture frames. Iron fences. Boats. No matter what it is, it will eventually be made on a mass scale more cheaply than regular folks ever can.

All these things will survive in rarefied boutique form, like what I do. There will be quilters and carpenters and bakers, craftspeople making fine things for discerning and flush customers, but consumer goods for everyone else? Small producers will continue to be killed in the market by fewer and fewer larger and larger entities. Like, say, those that can afford robots.

Where does that leave everyone else?

There’s the rub.


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Re: Desperation Acres

#10

Post by Suranis » Sat Jun 02, 2018 11:43 pm

One solution would be to tax robots.

The other thing is that as oil based resources get scarcer building robots will get more expensive.

But ya, it is a very big problem, and it s coming up on us hard. Even the wondrous coal jobs people think are out there have been replaced by 20 guys crushing a mountain with Robots.


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Re: Desperation Acres

#11

Post by Slim Cognito » Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:39 am

RoadScholar wrote:
Sat Jun 02, 2018 11:11 pm
It is the fallout of runaway capitalism. It was inevitable, and the brake lines have been cut.

With no teeth in antitrust laws and few government objections to monopolies, the Walmart-ization of America, and eventually the world, continues apace. We also used to tax them stiffly, and use the proceeds to build roads and schools and benefit all the population, as a brake on runaway capitalization. But they’ve now bribed their way out of it.

And so it has come to this: Nobody can make anything anymore, almost (see below).

Nobody sews because mass-produced clothes are so cheap. Small producers of milk, eggs, corn... no way they can compete with massively automated monolithic producers. Cabinets. Bicycles. Houses. Brooms. Books. Picture frames. Iron fences. Boats. No matter what it is, it will eventually be made on a mass scale more cheaply than regular folks ever can.

All these things will survive in rarefied boutique form, like what I do. There will be quilters and carpenters and bakers, craftspeople making fine things for discerning and flush customers, but consumer goods for everyone else? Small producers will continue to be killed in the market by fewer and fewer larger and larger entities. Like, say, those that can afford robots.

Where does that leave everyone else?

There’s the rub.
Boy howdy. I used to be quite the seamstress. Mom made me a deal as a teenager. If I made my clothes, she'd buy the fabric. If I wanted off the rack, I had to pay for them myself. I made my own patterns and dreamed of becoming a fashion designer. Did a few stints as wardrobe mistress for local community theaters. Then I had to get a real job. A few weeks ago I thought I'd sew up some fun aprons for my parrot cages (elasticized wraps that help hold in the mess) so I wandered over to the only fabric store in the area, JoAnnes. I just about died when I saw the price of a yard of simple cotton fabric. Checked ebay, same problem. So I'm back to buying them already made....from China...thru ebay.


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Re: Desperation Acres

#12

Post by Bill_G » Sun Jun 03, 2018 10:35 am

Slim Cognito wrote:
Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:39 am
Boy howdy. I used to be quite the seamstress. Mom made me a deal as a teenager. If I made my clothes, she'd buy the fabric. If I wanted off the rack, I had to pay for them myself. I made my own patterns and dreamed of becoming a fashion designer. Did a few stints as wardrobe mistress for local community theaters. Then I had to get a real job. A few weeks ago I thought I'd sew up some fun aprons for my parrot cages (elasticized wraps that help hold in the mess) so I wandered over to the only fabric store in the area, JoAnnes. I just about died when I saw the price of a yard of simple cotton fabric. Checked ebay, same problem. So I'm back to buying them already made....from China...thru ebay.
+1

Have you tried to get a zipper replaced lately? You can buy a new garment for the price. I deliberately paid too much for a zipper because I liked this fleece jacket, and I wanted the lady to stay in business. But! I had to go through the active decision process, do the costs and benefits in my head, and wonder whether I was delaying the inevitable.

I'm a hold out on auto-pay too. I want them to send me my bill every month to pay the postage to keep the mail service going, and to keep the people in their respective offices opening received envelopes. Every bill sent to me represents at least two people's jobs. But, at some point, businesses will tell me TFB bucko - go auto-pay or we shut off your electricity /cable / water et al.

(I have magazine subscriptions too ....)



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Re: Desperation Acres

#13

Post by TexasFilly » Sun Jun 03, 2018 10:47 am

In our little town north of the 45th parallel, milk is $1.09/gallon. Eggs are 49 cents/dozen. We are surrounded by beautiful, rolling farm country. I pay a lot more for locally grown chicken but boy howdy it tastes like real chicken! The folks there seem to do it for the love of the life, not to make a living.


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Re: Desperation Acres

#14

Post by ZekeB » Sun Jun 03, 2018 11:02 am

TexasFilly wrote: In our little town north of the 45th parallel, milk is $1.09/gallon. Eggs are 49 cents/dozen. We are surrounded by beautiful, rolling farm country. I pay a lot more for locally grown chicken but boy howdy it tastes like real chicken! The folks there seem to do it for the love of the life, not to make a living.
Do you live near the Amish? I live in a boondock town a bit south of the 45th. I have two sisters who live north of the 45th. We pay twice that for eggs when they are on sale. Milk is around $2.29 a gallon. There are 8 gas stations in town, all charging the exact same price. Those prices change within an hour of each other. Collusion. I can buy a side of beef for $1000, which is a good price for an excellent product.


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Re: Desperation Acres

#15

Post by neeneko » Sun Jun 03, 2018 11:32 am

Slim Cognito wrote:
Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:39 am
A few weeks ago I thought I'd sew up some fun aprons for my parrot cages (elasticized wraps that help hold in the mess) so I wandered over to the only fabric store in the area, JoAnnes. I just about died when I saw the price of a yard of simple cotton fabric. Checked ebay, same problem. So I'm back to buying them already made....from China...thru ebay.
I think at this point people mostly sew only if they are doing something exotic like costumes or something time/material intensive like drapes. Whenever I go to JoAnnes that seems to be what I run into.

The high price of cloth is a really strange bit of economics since the US is where the bulk of it is produced. The price you pay retail is heavily influenced by the large demand for cotton by Chinese manufacturers who produce clothes and then ship them right back. You are essentially paying for your inability to buy in bulk.



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Re: Desperation Acres

#16

Post by TexasFilly » Sun Jun 03, 2018 12:47 pm

ZekeB wrote:
Sun Jun 03, 2018 11:02 am
TexasFilly wrote: In our little town north of the 45th parallel, milk is $1.09/gallon. Eggs are 49 cents/dozen. We are surrounded by beautiful, rolling farm country. I pay a lot more for locally grown chicken but boy howdy it tastes like real chicken! The folks there seem to do it for the love of the life, not to make a living.
Do you live near the Amish? I live in a boondock town a bit south of the 45th. I have two sisters who live north of the 45th. We pay twice that for eggs when they are on sale. Milk is around $2.29 a gallon. There are 8 gas stations in town, all charging the exact same price. Those prices change within an hour of each other. Collusion. I can buy a side of beef for $1000, which is a good price for an excellent product.
Nope. Just "real" Americans. ;)


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Re: Desperation Acres

#17

Post by ZekeB » Sun Jun 03, 2018 2:44 pm

The Amish are real Americans. They live the lifestyle we lived back when we Maked America Great Again.


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Re: Desperation Acres

#18

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Sun Jun 03, 2018 3:37 pm

neeneko wrote:
Sun Jun 03, 2018 11:32 am

I think at this point people mostly sew only if they are doing something exotic like costumes or something time/material intensive like drapes. Whenever I go to JoAnnes that seems to be what I run into.

The high price of cloth is a really strange bit of economics since the US is where the bulk of it is produced. The price you pay retail is heavily influenced by the large demand for cotton by Chinese manufacturers who produce clothes and then ship them right back. You are essentially paying for your inability to buy in bulk.
Do you have a link for that? Unless things have changed drastically in the last few years, the US barely breaks the top 5 countries in textile production. Textile mills have been shutting down for decades and it's practically impossible to find American-made fabrics any more.

As for only costumes and draperies, JoAnn's is geared to the crafter and not the sewist, hence over half their floor space given over to other stuff. Walk in any dedicated fabric store with fabric that runs, on average, around $11/yd and you'll see that sewing isn't a dying art. Quilters alone have increased their spending from around $1.5 billion 25 years ago to upwards of $4 billion last year, and it's increasing every year. SVP Worldwide, makers of Singer, Viking and Pfaff machines, have had steady growth every year since 2006 when they consolidated the brands. In 2014, 65,000 quilters and sewists showed up for the show in Houston, including astronaut Karen Nyberg, who made a quilt block in space.



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Re: Desperation Acres

#19

Post by tek » Sun Jun 03, 2018 4:45 pm

Off Topic
We have a place near here that is a real FABRIC place.. Almost nobody in the general population knows it exists, but it has been around for decades. I go do husband stuff when ms.tek goes there (lately daughter.tek has gotten seriously into sewing, so the two of them go and I'm off the hook)

This place has a far larger selection of bolt ends and closeouts than any JoAnn has of total stock.

http://www.osgoodtextile.com/about_us.html

There might be a similar place near you; in the old days, we'd find such places in the Yellow Pages ("Let your fingers do the walking")


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Re: Desperation Acres

#20

Post by HilltownGrrl » Sun Jun 03, 2018 4:53 pm

Off Topic
I sew. Clothes for me - mostly skirts & summer dresses, many from the thousands of vintage patterns I have (the earliest are from the 30s, the majority are the 50s & 60s, & then there are all my patterns from the 70s to the present) as well as pillow covers for throw pillows, tablecloths, napkins, covers for things, vintage doll clothes for my vintage Barbies (my niece loves to play with them so I make clothes for them), etc. Yeah, it may cost more than what's in stores but the things I are make are beautiful, feel good to wear & touch, don't look like what everyone else is wearing, & aren't going to wear out with the first wash.

I do buy clothes but mostly at thrift shops (you should see my fabulous collection of vintage winter coats, all from Goodwill & SalArm, some with fur collars, & the most I paid for one was $45). The one thing I will spend tons of money on is jeans. I am hard to fit (small waist then hips & muscular legs) so I will spend whatever I have to to get a pair that looks good & fits. I'm very, very careful with my clothes & shoes so they usually last me several years (shoes, though, can last me decades - I still have some from HS). And this is another reason why I want to buy & make quality clothes - I like keeping clothes & shoes I love. I hate our throw-away mentality

Lest you think we're rolling in money, we're quite, quite broke. My husband got laid off in 2011 & it was nearly 6 years before he found a full-time job. We were a household of un- & under-employed that entire time but I'd much rather do without, save my money, & get good quality things - & that includes paying to get clothes repaired & tailored.

Slim - get on Joann's mailing list. They have amazing coupon deals. There's usually at least one 30 or 40% off coupon for one full priced thing every week (one length of fabric is one item) & large parts of the store are constantly on sale, including different kinds of fabric. I watch their weekly ad & go buy patterns (yes, I always need more *cough* :lol: ) when they go on sale for $1.99 each for Butterick, Simplicity, & McCalls. I'm not allowing myself to buy fabric until I use up some of my huge stash. sigh


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Re: Desperation Acres

#21

Post by HilltownGrrl » Sun Jun 03, 2018 4:58 pm

tek wrote:
Sun Jun 03, 2018 4:45 pm
Off Topic
We have a place near here that is a real FABRIC place.. Almost nobody in the general population knows it exists, but it has been around for decades. I go do husband stuff when ms.tek goes there (lately daughter.tek has gotten seriously into sewing, so the two of them go and I'm off the hook)

This place has a far larger selection of bolt ends and closeouts than any JoAnn has of total stock.

http://www.osgoodtextile.com/about_us.html

There might be a similar place near you; in the old days, we'd find such places in the Yellow Pages ("Let your fingers do the walking")
Off Topic
tek - I LOVE Osgoods! And The Textile Company in Greenfield is great, too. They're mosty printed cotton whereas Osgoods has just about everything


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Re: Desperation Acres

#22

Post by HilltownGrrl » Sun Jun 03, 2018 5:33 pm

Back on topic - I have spent much of the last 10-15+ years wondering about the whole "what are the rest of us going to do" (in relation to having jobs).

At first it was industries moving (WMass lost much of our industrial base - paper & textiles - in the 70s to North & South Carolina). Then it was outsourcing. I think we all expected factories to move - after all, we'd been in the first wave of that movement - but then corporations started moving everything else they could & it became a guessing game for what jobs/careers might be next. And now, robotics.

For a while, I kept thinking that eventually companies would realize if none of us were employed or paid enough, we also couldn't buy things & that would hurt them. But no. They just sell elsewhere or somehow, though magic numbers of some sort, pay themselves & shareholders no matter whether they sell things or not.

All of which is a very long-winded (my specialty) for - what the hell are we all going to do? Some backstory - our household was upper middle-class until my husband was laid off & we are now damn close to working poor. We're definitely paycheck-to-paycheck & just barely - so I think about this (the wth are we all going to do?) a lot. Right now every chain retailer in the valley is hiring - but those aren't living wages jobs & the other kind are hard to find.

Since I suspect basic pay for every person will never happen, it seems to me we either die, become Bladerunner, or figure out how to live in a world where there are very few jobs like the ones we grew up with. Part of me thinks turning inward, in terms of our local communities & regions (making, growing, repairing, etc, as much as possible locally) while using both barter & money (where it exists) could work. But I have no other good suggestions.

I didn't used to be this pessimistic about our employment futures but 6 years of painful job hunting sort of beat any optimism out of me. And if I had any optimism left, 45 has pretty much taken care of that.
Edit: typos & bad copy/paste


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Re: Desperation Acres

#23

Post by neeneko » Sun Jun 03, 2018 7:17 pm

Sugar Magnolia wrote:
Sun Jun 03, 2018 3:37 pm
Do you have a link for that? Unless things have changed drastically in the last few years, the US barely breaks the top 5 countries in textile production. Textile mills have been shutting down for decades and it's practically impossible to find American-made fabrics any more.
I admit I have not looked it up in a while. The two quickest sources I can find:

https://atlas.media.mit.edu/en/visualiz ... 5201/2012/
http://www.worldstopexports.com/cotton- ... y-country/

The former is a bit dated, and I did not put much effort into looking into which stage of processing they are talking about, but both still put the US in the top 5 at least.
As for only costumes and draperies, JoAnn's is geared to the crafter and not the sewist, hence over half their floor space given over to other stuff. Walk in any dedicated fabric store with fabric that runs, on average, around $11/yd and you'll see that sewing isn't a dying art. Quilters alone have increased their spending from around $1.5 billion 25 years ago to upwards of $4 billion last year, and it's increasing every year. SVP Worldwide, makers of Singer, Viking and Pfaff machines, have had steady growth every year since 2006 when they consolidated the brands. In 2014, 65,000 quilters and sewists showed up for the show in Houston, including astronaut Karen Nyberg, who made a quilt block in space.
Heh, I always forget about quilters, even though I have an obsessive one in the family.

I guess what I was getting at though is at least when I run into them, sewing has transitioned to a 'making special things' hobby as opposed to every day clothing. So costumes, drapes, special occasion dresses/tuxes/coats, things like that.



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Judge Roy Bean
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Re: Desperation Acres

#24

Post by Judge Roy Bean » Sun Jun 03, 2018 7:43 pm

The arguments have gone on forever and it helps to step back and take a larger economic view - consider this:
A study by economists at the consultancy Deloitte seeks to shed new light on the relationship between jobs and the rise of technology by trawling through census data for England and Wales going back to 1871.
...
The census data also provide an insight into the impact on jobs in a once-large, but now almost forgotten, sector. In 1901, in a population in England and Wales of 32.5 million, 200,000 people were engaged in washing clothes. By 2011, with a population of 56.1 million just 35,000 people worked in the sector.
...
The Deloitte economists believe that rising incomes have allowed consumers to spend more on personal services, such as grooming. That in turn has driven employment of hairdressers.

So while in 1871, there was one hairdresser or barber for every 1,793 citizens of England and Wales; today there is one for every 287 people.
These kinds of things are not the result of some evil conspiracy. What all of us decide to spend money on is the ultimate driving force.


“Where all think alike, no one thinks very much.”
Walter Lippmann

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Sugar Magnolia
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Re: Desperation Acres

#25

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Sun Jun 03, 2018 8:29 pm

neeneko wrote:
Sun Jun 03, 2018 7:17 pm
Sugar Magnolia wrote:
Sun Jun 03, 2018 3:37 pm
Do you have a link for that? Unless things have changed drastically in the last few years, the US barely breaks the top 5 countries in textile production. Textile mills have been shutting down for decades and it's practically impossible to find American-made fabrics any more.
I admit I have not looked it up in a while. The two quickest sources I can find:

https://atlas.media.mit.edu/en/visualiz ... 5201/2012/
http://www.worldstopexports.com/cotton- ... y-country/

The former is a bit dated, and I did not put much effort into looking into which stage of processing they are talking about, but both still put the US in the top 5 at least.
Both of those links are for raw cotton exports, not cloth (textiles) as you originally said. Even if all the raw cotton stayed in this country, we no longer have the processing facilities to turn it into threads that can then be woven in the mills that are long gone. And there is some doubt as to whether cotton processing would even be feasible in the US due to the incredibly high amount of toxic processing required for it to be turned into useful fabric. A yard of fabric would cost closer to $50/yd than $10/yd.



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