The Rent Is Too Damn High

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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#76

Post by Addie » Thu Jun 22, 2017 4:36 pm

HuffPo
The Hourly Income You Need To Afford Rent Around The U.S.

Full-time workers who make minimum wage can’t afford a two-bedroom rental home in any state in the U.S. without spending more than the recommended 30 percent of their income, according to a report from the National Low Income Housing Coalition.

The group’s annual “Out of Reach” report compares minimum wages and housing costs in states, metropolitan areas and counties across the country. This year’s results show the hourly wage rate needed for a “modest” two-bedroom rental is more than double the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour in all but four states.



Arkansas has the lowest hourly income needed for a two-bedroom rental at $13.72, and the state minimum wage is $8.50, the report said. Hawaii demands the highest income of renters: Workers need to make $35.20 to rent a two-bedroom there, and the state minimum wage is just $9.25.

At federal minimum wage, the average American worker would need to log 117-hour weeks for 52 weeks per year to afford a two-bedroom apartment or rental home, according to the report. For the overwhelming majority, not even sharing a dual income with a federal minimum wage-earning partner would cover a two-bedroom rental in their state.


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#77

Post by Addie » Thu Jun 29, 2017 1:25 pm

The Guardian
Low-income workers who live in RVs are being 'chased out' of Silicon Valley streets ...

Amid complaints from residents, Palo Alto has announced it will enforce a rule that bans vehicles from parking in the same spot for longer than 72 hours. The RV dwellers must accede – they have few other options. Silicon Valley was recently ranked the second most inaccessible region in the country for low-income workers trying to find a place to live. Palo Alto’s minimum wage is $12 an hour, but someone would have to earn $42.69 an hour to rent a two-bedroom apartment while having enough left over for other necessities. ...

Mike Becker, 52, said he arrived in the Bay Area at the age of 20 and began living in the vehicle a few years ago after his rent was raised and he lost a carpentry job. The RV was free on Craigslist and makes sense because if he rented a home, “I wouldn’t have enough to pay for food”. He added, “I’m stigmatized with the rest of the RVers. I get the sense they think we’re dirtbags.”

Nicholas Newbury, 35, emerged from a beaten-up trailer with a tarp tied roughly over the top for privacy and protection from the weather. “I’m not upset about it,” he said of the city’s plan, “but at same time, where else do they want us to go?” (He only sleeps occasionally in the trailer, which is not his; at nights he searches the trash on Stanford’s campus looking for cans to sell to recyclers.)

RV dwellers are often local, said Brian Greenberg of LifeMoves, an organization that helps homeless people move into housing. “There’s this myth that we attract people from all over the place, and it really is a myth. Most of the people are what I’d say are our people – they graduated from local high schools on the peninsula, in Silicon Valley. People aren’t as mobile as one would think.”


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#78

Post by Addie » Sat Jul 29, 2017 11:21 am

NYRB: Tenants Under Siege: Inside New York City’s Housing Crisis


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#79

Post by Addie » Tue Nov 14, 2017 9:42 am

Associated Press
‘We still need to eat’: Tech boom creates working homeless

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (AP) — In the same affluent, suburban city where Google built its headquarters, Tes Saldana lives in a crowded but tidy camper she parks on the street.

She concedes it’s “not a very nice living situation,” but it also is not unusual. Until authorities told them to move, more than a dozen other RVs filled with people who can’t afford rent joined Saldana on a tree-lined street in Mountain View, parked between a Target and a luxury apartment complex.

Homeless advocates and city officials say it’s outrageous that in the shadow of a booming tech economy - where young millionaires dine on $15 wood-grilled avocado and think nothing of paying $1,000 for an iPhone X - thousands of families can’t afford a home. Many of the homeless work regular jobs, in some cases serving the very people whose sky-high net worth is the reason housing has become unaffordable for so many.

Across the street from Saldana’s camper, for example, two-bedroom units in the apartment complex start at $3,840, including concierge service. That’s more than she brings home, even in a good month.


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#80

Post by Addie » Wed Dec 06, 2017 12:37 pm

Associated Press
US homeless count rises for first time in 7 years

LOS ANGELES — The nation’s homeless population increased this year for the first time since 2010, driven by a surge in the number of people living on the streets in Los Angeles and other West Coast cities.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development released its annual Point in Time count Wednesday, a report that showed nearly 554,000 homeless people across the country during local tallies conducted in January. That figure is up nearly 1 percent from 2016.

Of that total, 193,000 people had no access to nightly shelter and instead were staying in vehicles, tents, the streets and other places considered uninhabitable. The unsheltered figure is up by more than 9 percent compared to two years ago.

Increases are higher in several West Coast cities, where the explosion in homelessness has prompted at least 10 city and county governments to declare states of emergency since 2015.

City officials, homeless advocates and those living on the streets point to a main culprit: the region’s booming economy.

Rents have soared beyond affordability for many lower-wage workers who until just a just few years ago could typically find a place to stay. Now, even a temporary setback can be enough to leave them out on the streets.


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#81

Post by Volkonski » Wed Dec 06, 2017 12:44 pm

Living in cars, working for Amazon: meet America's new nomads

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... CMP=twt_gu
During three years of research for my book, Nomadland: Surviving America in The Twenty-First Century, I spent time with hundreds of people who had arrived at the same answer. They gave up traditional housing and moved into “wheel estate”: RVs, travel trailers, vans, pickup campers, even a salvaged Prius and other sedans. For many, sacrificing some material comforts had allowed them to survive, while reclaiming a small measure of freedom and autonomy. But that didn’t mean life on the road was easy.

My first encounter with one group of the new nomads came in 2013, at the Desert Rose RV park in Fernley, Nevada. It was populated by members of the “precariat”: temporary laborers doing short-term jobs in exchange for low wages. Its citizens were full-time wanderers who dwelled in RVs and other vehicles, though at least one guy had only a tent to live in. Many were in their 60s and 70s, approaching or well into traditional retirement age. Most could not afford to stop working – or pay the rent.

:snippity:

Amazon recruited these workers as part of a program it calls CamperForce: a labor unit made up of nomads who work as seasonal employees at several of its warehouses, which the company calls “fulfillment centers”.

Along with thousands of traditional temps, they’re hired to meet the heavy shipping demands of “peak season” – the consumer bonanza that spans the three to four months before Christmas.


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#82

Post by neeneko » Wed Dec 06, 2017 12:46 pm

Addie wrote:
Thu Jun 29, 2017 1:25 pm
Mike Becker, 52, said he arrived in the Bay Area at the age of 20 and began living in the vehicle a few years ago after his rent was raised and he lost a carpentry job. The RV was free on Craigslist and makes sense because if he rented a home, “I wouldn’t have enough to pay for food”. He added, “I’m stigmatized with the rest of the RVers. I get the sense they think we’re dirtbags.”
The thing I find fascinating about this is that it shows, when landlords are unable to lock up the bulk of the land, how affordable 'home ownership' actually is in these regions.



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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#83

Post by Flatpointhigh » Wed Dec 06, 2017 12:52 pm

neeneko wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 12:46 pm
Addie wrote:
Thu Jun 29, 2017 1:25 pm
Mike Becker, 52, said he arrived in the Bay Area at the age of 20 and began living in the vehicle a few years ago after his rent was raised and he lost a carpentry job. The RV was free on Craigslist and makes sense because if he rented a home, “I wouldn’t have enough to pay for food”. He added, “I’m stigmatized with the rest of the RVers. I get the sense they think we’re dirtbags.”
The thing I find fascinating about this is that it shows, when landlords are unable to lock up the bulk of the land, how affordable 'home ownership' actually is in these regions.
and, the folks who depend on these people for doing "grunt work" like cleaning, food service are "outraged" over their living in RV's and having to park in their neighborhoods due to the laws regarding RV parks where they need to vacate the park for a couple of days every month.



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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#84

Post by neeneko » Wed Dec 06, 2017 1:05 pm

Flatpointhigh wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 12:52 pm
and, the folks who depend on these people for doing "grunt work" like cleaning, food service are "outraged" over their living in RV's and having to park in their neighborhoods due to the laws regarding RV parks where they need to vacate the park for a couple of days every month.
I can not help but think of the various Levittown projects (used to live outside them) which pioneered communities planned around the idea of 'nice' areas where you brought in people with money and the nearby but physically separated 'white trash' area where you could house all the people you need to make the nice jobs work, but also be sure to keep the land rented so planners could get rid of all the poor people once the construction and ramp up happened.



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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#85

Post by Addie » Mon Feb 26, 2018 1:13 pm

HuffPo
9 Foundations Partner To Tackle America’s Housing Crisis, As Trump Tries To Gut Funding

It’s no secret the U.S. is in the midst of an affordable housing crisis. Rents are spiraling out of control while incomes stagnate, with rents increasing at more than triple the rate of wages over the last 50 years.

The increasingly desperate situation has led nine U.S. foundations, including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Ford Foundation, to announce on Tuesday that they are launching a partnership to tackle systemic problems in the housing market. The aim: to ensure that the more than 11 million families across the country that spend more than half of their paycheck on rent and those who are homeless have access to safe, affordable housing.

The partnership, called Funders For Housing and Opportunity, has divided an initial $4.9 million in grant money between four nonprofits that tackle housing insecurity. This first tranche of money is aimed “mostly in the area of policy, advocacy and organizing,” said Susan Thomas, senior program officer at Melville Charitable Trust and chair of Funders for Housing and Opportunity. ...

“The research that’s been building shows us that when people are struggling so much just to afford their homes, they’re suffering in a multitude of ways,” said Diane Yentel, president and CEO of the NLIHC. “They have poor health, their kids are unable to do as well in school as their peers who are affordable housed, they have lower lifetime earnings and they even have have lower life expectancy.”

The NLIHC was behind stark research last year into rent affordability, which found that for those working a 40-hour week on the minimum wage, there is no state in the country where a modest two-bedroom rental home is affordable (defined as costing less than 30 percent of the renters’ income). A renter earning the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour would need to work 117 hours a week for a two-bedroom rental home to be affordable.


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#86

Post by Volkonski » Tue Mar 06, 2018 11:00 am

Meanwhile on the North Fork efforts at affordable housing-

Peconic Crossing seeking applications for workforce housing apartments

https://riverheadlocal.com/2018/03/06/p ... partments/
Peconic Crossing is putting the finishing touches on 45 new apartments in downtown Riverhead. Overlooking the Peconic River and Grangebel Park, the units will be available to tenants who meet income limits, with preferences given to artists and people displaced by certain storms, including Superstorm Sandy.

Rents will be regulated by the N.Y. Homes and Community Renewal agency and set at rates the agency deems affordable to households with annual incomes at 50 percent and 60 percent of the Suffolk County median income for one-, two-, three- and four-person households. Rents will include heat and hot water, according to a presentation made by the developers to town officials in December 2014.

Tenants will have access to a fully equipped fitness room, a laundry center and common gallery spaces designed for resident artists to display their creations.


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#87

Post by Addie » Tue Mar 06, 2018 11:08 am

Looks nice. I like that there are stores along the street level.


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#88

Post by AndyinPA » Tue Mar 06, 2018 12:08 pm

I agree with this. Congress critters make more than enough money to be able to afford an apartment, at the least. I know rent is not cheap in DC, but if you can't afford to pay it, don't run for the office. $174,000 a year is not peanuts.

https://www.politico.com/story/2018/03/ ... own-431969
A bloc of House Democrats is calling for an ethics investigation into the widespread practice of lawmakers sleeping in their offices, arguing it's an abuse of taxpayer funds.

More than two dozen members of the Congressional Black Caucus signed on to a letter obtained by POLITICO to Ethics Committee Chairwoman Susan Brooks (R-Ind.) and ranking member Ted Deutch (D-Fla.) asking for a probe into the “legality and propriety” of such conduct by members of Congress.



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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#89

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Mar 18, 2018 5:08 pm




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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#90

Post by Addie » Tue Mar 27, 2018 11:43 am

Miami Herald
Teachers can’t afford Miami rents. The county has a plan: Let them live at school.

Amid a wide gap between modest teacher salaries and Miami’s high housing prices, the county has a new plan: build apartments on school property and let faculty live there.

A preliminary proposal includes constructing a new mid-rise middle school in the luxe Brickell area for Southside Elementary, with a floor devoted to residential units, and several more reserved for parking and the classrooms on top. If that goes well, Miami-Dade wants a full-fledged housing complex next to Phillis Wheatley Elementary, with as many as 300 apartments going up on the campus just north of downtown.

“It’s an exciting idea,” said Michael Liu, Miami-Dade’s housing director. “Land is at a premium in Miami-Dade County. It’s difficult to come by, especially in the urban core.” ...

Miami-Dade is already in talks with Housing and Urban Development, the federal agency that oversees some of the county’s affordable-housing projects. JPMorgan Chase gave a $215,000 grant to the nonprofit Miami Homes For All to help develop the Wheatley plan, according to a March 22 company release.

Miami’s Omni Community Redevelopment Area — a downtown tax district with a budget of more than $50 million a year — in January voted to back a complex development agreement that would send dollars to the Wheatley project.


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#91

Post by Addie » Sun Apr 01, 2018 1:37 pm

Daily Beast
Landless Americans Are the New Serf Class

While home ownership remains the dream of most Americans, fewer and fewer people here can afford to own one.

For the better part of the past century, the American dream was defined, in large part, by that “universal aspiration” to own a home. As housing prices continue to outstrip household income, that’s changing as more and more younger Americans are ending up landless, and not by choice.

The share of homeownership has dropped most rapidly among the key shapers of the American future—millennials, immigrants, minorities. Since 2000, the home ownership among those under 45 has plunged 20 percent. In places like Atlanta, Dallas-Fort Worth, Houston, and Indianapolis, and elsewhere, households with less than the median income qualify for a median-priced home with a 10 percent down payment, according to the National Association of Realtors. But in Seattle, Miami, and Denver, a household needs to make more than 120 percent of the median income to afford such median-priced house. In California, it’s even tougher: 140 percent in Los Angeles, 180 percent in San Diego, and over 190 percent in San Francisco.

Rents are rising as well. According to Zillow, for workers between the ages of 22 and 34, rent costs claim upwards of 45 percent of income in Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York, and Miami, compared to closer to 30 percent in Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston.

The basic reality: America’s new generation, particularly in some metros, increasingly seems destined to live as renters, without ever enjoying equity in property.


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn Highoe

#92

Post by TollandRCR » Sun Apr 01, 2018 7:38 pm

We trust in the ‘market’ to set rents rationally. That does not mean that rents are set affordably.

If the houses and apartments are all rented at current market rates, then in a rational market developers would build more housing. That is nit happening. Why?


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn Highoe

#93

Post by RVInit » Sun Apr 01, 2018 7:52 pm

TollandRCR wrote:
Sun Apr 01, 2018 7:38 pm
We trust in the ‘market’ to set rents rationally. That does not mean that rents are set affordably.

If the houses and apartments are all rented at current market rates, then in a rational market developers would build more housing. That is nit happening. Why?
Apparently you haven't visited Florida recently. The building has almost reached the insane levels we were at prior to the big Bush crash. :madguy:


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn

#94

Post by TollandRCR » Sun Apr 01, 2018 8:14 pm

I do not intend to visit Florida at all, ever, unless the Parkland students somehow need me.

I was writing sardonically about the “rational market” behind the U. S housing system. I suspect that California and Hawaii are equally irrational for different reasons, and Florida is as weird.

Our ‘rational market” has produced one of the most severe nationwide inequalities in income and in wealth in the world. Don’t believe me? Check the CIA data.

Our “rational market” is not a joke. It is a horror.


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#95

Post by Addie » Sun Apr 01, 2018 9:46 pm

Miami New Times
Miami Has a Four-Year Backlog of Overbuilt Luxury Condos Amid Affordable-Housing Crisis

By nearly every metric, Miami-Dade County is one of the most difficult places to live if you don't make a ton of money. The county's median income is a staggeringly low $44,000, compared to the $80,000 median income in a comparably expensive city such as Seattle. That means Miamians wind up spending a higher percentage of their incomes on rent than residents of any other city in America.

What have Miami-area officials done to help the working poor? They've encouraged developers to overbuild so many luxury condos for millionaires that it will now take years to sell them all, according to new research from local real-estate analyst Peter Zalewski.

Zalewski's CraneSpotters.com reported at the end of February that it will take 49 months (just over four years) to sell all the luxury condos developers have built across town. As of February 27, there were 2,767 luxury-grade condos up for sale across the county — despite the fact that ultrawealthy buyers bought only 684 of those units (57 per month) in 2017. A luxury condo in this instance costs a minimum of $1 million. (There were, in total, 14,452 condo units for sale across the county as of a month ago — an oversupply of about 16 months.)

The problem is especially bad in some of Miami-Dade's fanciest zip codes. Earlier this month, Zalewski noted that Miami Beach, Bal Harbour, and Sunny Isles Beach each have a four-year backlog. Downtown Miami has a whopping 6.5-year backlog.


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#96

Post by Suranis » Mon Apr 02, 2018 7:22 am

Its the same here in Ireland. I saw on the News last night that in Dublin to get a house you need to pay something in the order of 350,000 euros, which is roughly half a million dollars. Around here its around a quarter of a million Euros. And the number of Homeless is going up all the time, and the only solution is people screaming that they should be building more houses.

My question is... Where? Dublin is a huge urban sprawl filled with massive housing estates with no amenities. The problem is that people are desperate to live in Dublin because that's where the Jobs are. HOWEVER they are flat our refusing to build any kind of apartment blocks in Dublin. You see, Dubliners see themselves as living in a bunch of villages, Such as the "village" of Finglas or Clontarf, despite the fact that there is actually no visible boundary between these "villages." Also people want to live in discrete houses. A whole lot of the problem could be solved by only building 4 floor apartment blocks, but they refuse to do it.

The other problem is that rental properties are prices way beyond what people are able to actually pay. So properties in Dublin are left empty for Months or Years.


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#97

Post by Whatever4 » Mon Apr 02, 2018 10:01 am

Here in Boston, where we are in the midst of showing our condo there’s a very tight market. Our place is the only 2BD/2BA in a mile radius under a million. Offers due Tuesday.

We’ve had a couple of offers trying to beat the deadline by expiring yesterday or today. Several Asian parties wanting to rent to Asian students. One bewildered lady from San Francisco wondering why things seem similar to SF.

Boston has extremely low unemployment and a huge student population. There’s plenty of new construction but it’s either high-rise rentals or luxury condos. Units in my building rent for $3500 per month, and there’s never vacancies for more than a few weeks.

Part of the reason is Boston itself. When the housing crisis hit, people who could afford it moved in closer from remote suburbs. The prices here leveled out but never went down.

Crossing our fingers and chanting our mantra: “bulls and bears make money, pigs get slaughtered.”


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#98

Post by AndyinPA » Mon Apr 02, 2018 10:16 am

Millennials are also shut out because they are heavily in debt for college loans. It's a lot harder to take on, or probably even get, a mortgage when you owe so much money.

Something that just occurred to me while writing this is about Amazon looking for its HQ2 (?) facilities here, which I am completely against. I'm against it first because I just generally dislike the corporate way of playing one area against another to get the most breaks for itself. Second, the area that Amazon is looking to locate in the city if they come here is an area I drive through frequently. It can at rush hours barely handle the traffic now. Now it occurs to me that if they locate here, that will drive up rent and cost of housing. We have a pretty stable, relatively inexpensive housing/rental market here. That would go out the window.



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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#99

Post by Addie » Fri Apr 13, 2018 11:36 am

NPR
First-Ever Evictions Database Shows: 'We're In the Middle Of A Housing Crisis'

For many poor families in America, eviction is a real and ongoing threat. Sociologist Matthew Desmond estimates that 2.3 million evictions were filed in the U.S. in 2016 — a rate of four every minute.

"Eviction isn't just a condition of poverty; it's a cause of poverty," Desmond says.
"Eviction is a direct cause of homelessness, but it also is a cause of residential instability, school instability [and] community instability."

Desmond won a Pulitzer Prize in 2017 for his book, Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City. His latest project is The Eviction Lab, a team of researchers and students at Princeton University dedicated to amassing the nation's first-ever database of eviction. To date, the Lab had collected 83 million records from 48 states and the District of Columbia.

"We're in the middle of a housing crisis, and that means more and more people are giving more and more of their income to rent and utilities," Desmond says. "Our hope is that we can take this problem that's been in the dark and bring it into the light."


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#100

Post by Addie » Wed Apr 25, 2018 3:21 pm

WaPo
HUD Secretary Ben Carson to propose tripling rent for some low-income Americans

U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson on Wednesday will propose tripling the amount the poorest households are expected to pay for rent as well as encourage those receiving housing subsidies to work, according to the administration’s legislative proposal obtained by The Washington Post.

The move to overhaul how low-income rental subsidies are calculated would affect more than 4.5 million families relying on federal housing assistance. The proposal legislation would require congressional approval.

Currently, tenants generally pay 30 percent of their adjusted income toward rent or a public housing agency minimum rent -- which is capped at $50 a month for the poorest families. The administration’s legislative proposal sets the family monthly rent contribution at 35 percent of gross income or 35 percent of their earnings working 15 hours a week at the federal minimum wage. Under the proposal, the cap for the poorest families would rise to approximately $150 a month, three times higher than the current minimum.

The Trump administration has long signaled through its budget proposals and leaked draft legislation that it seeks to increase the rents low-income tenants pay to live in federally subsidized housing.


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